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Riots Washington State

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NEWS
April 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Seattle Police Department concedes it was not ready for trouble at the World Trade Organization meeting last fall, though it had ample warning that thousands of demonstrators hoped to hobble the gathering. "In retrospect, SPD commanders put their faith in historical precedent--the Seattle tradition of peaceful protest--in assessing the needs for policing the WTO event," Assistant Police Chief Clark Kimerer wrote in the report made public Tuesday.
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NEWS
April 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Seattle Police Department concedes it was not ready for trouble at the World Trade Organization meeting last fall, though it had ample warning that thousands of demonstrators hoped to hobble the gathering. "In retrospect, SPD commanders put their faith in historical precedent--the Seattle tradition of peaceful protest--in assessing the needs for policing the WTO event," Assistant Police Chief Clark Kimerer wrote in the report made public Tuesday.
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NEWS
December 8, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police Chief Norm Stamper said Tuesday that he will step down, a week after his outnumbered officers watched helplessly as mobs of World Trade Organization protesters rampaged through downtown Seattle--leaving behind $19 million in damage and lost retail sales. "By making it clear that my role in the department is not one of self-interest, I will be able to make the most positive contribution as I oversee and participate in a review of . . .
NEWS
January 6, 2000 | Associated Press
Five days of rioting during the World Trade Organization meeting raised the city's cost of hosting the conference to $9 million, surpassing worst-case projections. Broken windows, graffiti and trash littered streets after violent protests and clashes between demonstrators and police. Police overtime was more costly than planned. The city had hoped the federal government and the private group that arranged the conference would help pay the tab, but most of that funding dried up.
NEWS
December 2, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The World Trade Organization--along with the protests rocking its Seattle meeting this week--has found its way into Campaign 2000, although in a rather nuanced fashion. But unlike such issues as health care and taxes, free trade is less of a divisive issue among the major candidates.
NEWS
December 1, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON and EVELYN IRITANI and KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a daylong spasm of protest, a diverse army of demonstrators paralyzed downtown Seattle on Tuesday, forcing a delay in the start of a World Trade Organization summit and plunging parts of the city into chaos. By nightfall, city officials had declared a curfew, and Washington Gov. Gary Locke called for up to 200 unarmed National Guardsmen to occupy the streets this morning and up to 300 state troopers to provide relief for Seattle police.
NEWS
December 2, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seattle police, thrust into the international spotlight by the chaotic protests at the World Trade Organization conference, failed to adequately predict the size, strength or potential violence of the thousands of demonstrators, law enforcement experts said Wednesday.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was meant to be a dignified, focused affair. But in an unscripted howl of protest, this week's summit of the World Trade Organization turned into something revolutionary. On the tear-gas shrouded streets of Seattle, the unruly forces of democracy collided with the elite world of trade policy. And when the meeting ended in failure late Friday, the elitists had lost and debate was changed forever. Hum-drum trade issues were reborn as supercharged social concerns.
NEWS
January 6, 2000 | Associated Press
Five days of rioting during the World Trade Organization meeting raised the city's cost of hosting the conference to $9 million, surpassing worst-case projections. Broken windows, graffiti and trash littered streets after violent protests and clashes between demonstrators and police. Police overtime was more costly than planned. The city had hoped the federal government and the private group that arranged the conference would help pay the tab, but most of that funding dried up.
NEWS
December 2, 1999 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year, when University of Washington students took to the streets to protest an anti-affirmative action initiative, they did it the way people usually do things here: They were organized. They were polite and civil. "They took care to call police and let them know exactly where they were going to be marching, what streets they would turn on," recalled King County Executive Ron Sims. "That's very Seattle. Organized dissent is enjoyed here.
NEWS
December 8, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police Chief Norm Stamper said Tuesday that he will step down, a week after his outnumbered officers watched helplessly as mobs of World Trade Organization protesters rampaged through downtown Seattle--leaving behind $19 million in damage and lost retail sales. "By making it clear that my role in the department is not one of self-interest, I will be able to make the most positive contribution as I oversee and participate in a review of . . .
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was meant to be a dignified, focused affair. But in an unscripted howl of protest, this week's summit of the World Trade Organization turned into something revolutionary. On the tear-gas shrouded streets of Seattle, the unruly forces of democracy collided with the elite world of trade policy. And when the meeting ended in failure late Friday, the elitists had lost and debate was changed forever. Hum-drum trade issues were reborn as supercharged social concerns.
NEWS
December 2, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The World Trade Organization--along with the protests rocking its Seattle meeting this week--has found its way into Campaign 2000, although in a rather nuanced fashion. But unlike such issues as health care and taxes, free trade is less of a divisive issue among the major candidates.
NEWS
December 2, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seattle police, thrust into the international spotlight by the chaotic protests at the World Trade Organization conference, failed to adequately predict the size, strength or potential violence of the thousands of demonstrators, law enforcement experts said Wednesday.
NEWS
December 2, 1999 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year, when University of Washington students took to the streets to protest an anti-affirmative action initiative, they did it the way people usually do things here: They were organized. They were polite and civil. "They took care to call police and let them know exactly where they were going to be marching, what streets they would turn on," recalled King County Executive Ron Sims. "That's very Seattle. Organized dissent is enjoyed here.
NEWS
December 1, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON and EVELYN IRITANI and KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a daylong spasm of protest, a diverse army of demonstrators paralyzed downtown Seattle on Tuesday, forcing a delay in the start of a World Trade Organization summit and plunging parts of the city into chaos. By nightfall, city officials had declared a curfew, and Washington Gov. Gary Locke called for up to 200 unarmed National Guardsmen to occupy the streets this morning and up to 300 state troopers to provide relief for Seattle police.
NEWS
May 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Police using tear gas and water hoses confronted rock-throwing party-goers near the Washington State University campus in Pullman. Three people were arrested, and 23 police officers were injured. The disturbance started when police went to investigate a car-pedestrian accident and encountered as many as 200 people at a rental house in the neighborhood. Authorities were unsure what prompted the violence, in which beer cans and rocks were thrown at the officers.
NEWS
December 1, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI
It's not the usual fodder for protest, but here are major issues facing trade ministers from 135 nations at the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle this week: AGRICULTURE The European Union says its massive farm subsidies are needed to preserve rural communities and jobs and to ensure food safety. The U.S., Australia, Canada and other countries say the subsidies are unfair because they create artificially low prices, undercutting producers in other countries.
NEWS
December 1, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI
It's not the usual fodder for protest, but here are major issues facing trade ministers from 135 nations at the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle this week: AGRICULTURE The European Union says its massive farm subsidies are needed to preserve rural communities and jobs and to ensure food safety. The U.S., Australia, Canada and other countries say the subsidies are unfair because they create artificially low prices, undercutting producers in other countries.
NEWS
May 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Police using tear gas and water hoses confronted rock-throwing party-goers near the Washington State University campus in Pullman. Three people were arrested, and 23 police officers were injured. The disturbance started when police went to investigate a car-pedestrian accident and encountered as many as 200 people at a rental house in the neighborhood. Authorities were unsure what prompted the violence, in which beer cans and rocks were thrown at the officers.
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