Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRiots Zambia
IN THE NEWS

Riots Zambia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Three people were reported killed Saturday when hundreds of Zambians poured into the streets of Lusaka, the capital, to celebrate a reported coup attempt. The army had quickly put down the coup attempt by an army lieutenant and a group of rebellious soldiers, who acted after five days of anti-government rioting. Afterward, loyalist soldiers guarding President Kenneth D.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Three people were reported killed Saturday when hundreds of Zambians poured into the streets of Lusaka, the capital, to celebrate a reported coup attempt. The army had quickly put down the coup attempt by an army lieutenant and a group of rebellious soldiers, who acted after five days of anti-government rioting. Afterward, loyalist soldiers guarding President Kenneth D.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 30, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Zambian army lieutenant was captured by soldiers after he announced on state radio today that President Kenneth D. Kaunda had been toppled in a coup following five days of anti-government violence. The announcer, who identified himself in repeated broadcasts as Lt. Mwamba Luchembe of the Signals Corps, was escorted from Radio Zambia's studio on the outskirts of the capital about 90 minutes later.
NEWS
June 30, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Zambian army lieutenant was captured by soldiers after he announced on state radio today that President Kenneth D. Kaunda had been toppled in a coup following five days of anti-government violence. The announcer, who identified himself in repeated broadcasts as Lt. Mwamba Luchembe of the Signals Corps, was escorted from Radio Zambia's studio on the outskirts of the capital about 90 minutes later.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | From Reuters
Thousands of people watched quietly Thursday as President Kenneth D. Kaunda toured central Lusaka after food riots that killed at least 24 people, but elsewhere in the Zambian capital students held a noisy demonstration calling on him to resign. Kaunda, facing the worst crisis of his 26-year rule, inspected the central shopping district where goods worth thousands of dollars were looted in three days of rioting. "Zambia will not allow itself to be ruled by thuggery," the 66-year-old leader said.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least 23 people have been killed in three days of food rioting that has spread from Lusaka, the capital, to smaller cities. President Kenneth D. Kaunda vowed to crack down on rioters protesting increased food prices. The unrest began after the government more than doubled the price of cornmeal, Zambia's staple food, as part of an economic reform program.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | Associated Press
Thousands of youths rioted Tuesday in the northern mining town of Kitwe, attacking police and looting stores to protest a 100% increase in the price of corn meal, witnesses said. South African radio quoted the Zambian news agency ZANA as saying that three people were killed, but there was no independent confirmation of any deaths. The British Broadcasting Corp., quoting announcements from the government-controlled radio station in Lusaka, reported that President Kenneth D.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | From Reuters
Thousands of people watched quietly Thursday as President Kenneth D. Kaunda toured central Lusaka after food riots that killed at least 24 people, but elsewhere in the Zambian capital students held a noisy demonstration calling on him to resign. Kaunda, facing the worst crisis of his 26-year rule, inspected the central shopping district where goods worth thousands of dollars were looted in three days of rioting. "Zambia will not allow itself to be ruled by thuggery," the 66-year-old leader said.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least 23 people have been killed in three days of food rioting that has spread from Lusaka, the capital, to smaller cities. President Kenneth D. Kaunda vowed to crack down on rioters protesting increased food prices. The unrest began after the government more than doubled the price of cornmeal, Zambia's staple food, as part of an economic reform program.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | Associated Press
Thousands of youths rioted Tuesday in the northern mining town of Kitwe, attacking police and looting stores to protest a 100% increase in the price of corn meal, witnesses said. South African radio quoted the Zambian news agency ZANA as saying that three people were killed, but there was no independent confirmation of any deaths. The British Broadcasting Corp., quoting announcements from the government-controlled radio station in Lusaka, reported that President Kenneth D.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|