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Rip Van Winkle Syndrome

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NEWS
January 5, 1992 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine losing a decade or more of life, not attending the high school senior prom or college, never holding a job or dating. Think of missing movies, picnics, baseball games, parties and vacations--almost everything most people take for granted. Try to imagine being a prisoner in the Skid Row of the mind.
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NEWS
January 6, 1992 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A new drug for schizophrenia--both more effective and more dangerous than anything else on the market--has created a tangle of ethical, scientific and public policy dilemmas across the country. The drug, clozapine, offers hope to several hundred thousand schizophrenics for whom traditional treatments have failed, many of whom have been driven by their illness from families and jobs into psychiatric wards, board-and-care homes and the streets.
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NEWS
January 6, 1992 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A new drug for schizophrenia--both more effective and more dangerous than anything else on the market--has created a tangle of ethical, scientific and public policy dilemmas across the country. The drug, clozapine, offers hope to several hundred thousand schizophrenics for whom traditional treatments have failed, many of whom have been driven by their illness from families and jobs into psychiatric wards, board-and-care homes and the streets.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine losing a decade or more of life, not attending the high school senior prom or college, never holding a job or dating. Think of missing movies, picnics, baseball games, parties and vacations--almost everything most people take for granted. Try to imagine being a prisoner in the Skid Row of the mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2002 | STEVE HOCHMAN
As Tears for Fears, childhood friends Curt Smith and Roland Orzabal were one of the biggest acts from England in the '80s, but for most of the '90s they didn't even speak to each other. Now they're back together for the 2000s, planning a new album and drawing interest from several major record labels, with a deal expected to be signed in the next few weeks. Plans are to record this summer and then do a full tour. But the two still have differences. "We hadn't spoken for 10 years," Smith says.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2007 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
FOR a while after "Hairspray" opened on Broadway, composer Marc Shaiman and his co-lyricist and life partner, Scott Wittman, would sneak into an empty box at the Neil Simon Theatre as the show was revving up for its infectious finale. Night after night, they'd search for a crevice in the packed audience to hide in. Then they'd turn their back to the stage. Behind them, a few dancers would start to spin to their aptly titled song, "You Can't Stop the Beat."
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