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Ripley Desert Woodland State Park

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2000 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you want to get outdoors and away from the TV and those holiday snacks, consider a visit to the Arthur B. Ripley Desert Woodland State Park, a little-known nature preserve northwest of Lancaster. Although the park is not staffed, its unusual beauty encourages people to respect it. Visitors park on the roadside and walk through a small gate in the fence that runs around the 580-acre site, which was designated a state park in 1994.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1998 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took 28 years, $13.7-million and hundreds of volunteers, but the hills and sandstone ramparts south of Santa Susana Pass finally became a state historic park Tuesday. With loud cheers from the audience, the California State Park and Recreation Commission voted unanimously to recognize the 670-acre tract's storied past, where Native Americans once performed sacred rituals and stagecoaches trundled across steep rock roads.
TRAVEL
March 25, 2007 | Mary E. Forgione
ASK Cecilia Rejas about poppy blooms this year, and she gets all Lemony Snicket on you. "It was a series of unfortunate events," the California state park ranger said, sighing. She's talking, of course, about the missing carpet of orange that usually appears on the hills this time of year at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve. First it was a lack of decent rainfall in late fall and early winter.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Tony Valois will tell you that a tough wildflower year doesn't mean there aren't any flowers. It just means you have to try harder to find them. And he should know. The vegetation ecologist for the National Park Service hit a milestone recently when he identified his 1,000th plant species in the coastal and mountain parkland that includes the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. Valois says he spent a decade collecting data, taking pictures and cataloging his finds -- and wound up with enough information to create a free app for identifying Santa Monica Mountains flowers.
TRAVEL
February 28, 2010 | Benoit LeBourgeois
The valleys and hillsides of the Southern California deserts have been preparing all winter for their close-up. Silent and forlorn, often harsh and austere, they're ready to shed their mantle of earth tones and dress themselves in wildflowers, thanks to the rain storms and subsequent warm days. Here's a look at what's unfolding in some of Southern California's best natural settings. If you go These five parks regularly update wildflower reports on their websites during viewing season.
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