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September 12, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Believe it or not: Alexander Patty could walk up and down staircases on his head. Believe it or not: Slater Barron created a portrait of John Wayne out of laundry lint. Believe it or not: A company based on sharing such oddities with the public is thriving in today's entertainment market, which is otherwise trending toward the elaborate and the high-tech. Ripley Entertainment, the Orlando, Fla.-based chain that operates 38 attractions in 12 countries, says it's enjoying a banner year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2011
The huge Michael Jackson portrait that Sunland artist Seaton Brown created from 1,680 empty soda cans, calling it "A Tribute to the King of Pop," has reached its logical destination. Brown said he recently sold the 144-square-foot work to Ripley Entertainment, which operates a chain of 31 Ripley's Believe It or Not! museums in 10 countries, including the one in Hollywood. Brown said the work fetched a not-quite-kingly $7,500 — enough, however, to cover the $1,000 he spent on raw materials (including about $600 worth of soda pop that he poured down the drain)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2011
The huge Michael Jackson portrait that Sunland artist Seaton Brown created from 1,680 empty soda cans, calling it "A Tribute to the King of Pop," has reached its logical destination. Brown said he recently sold the 144-square-foot work to Ripley Entertainment, which operates a chain of 31 Ripley's Believe It or Not! museums in 10 countries, including the one in Hollywood. Brown said the work fetched a not-quite-kingly $7,500 — enough, however, to cover the $1,000 he spent on raw materials (including about $600 worth of soda pop that he poured down the drain)
BUSINESS
September 12, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Believe it or not: Alexander Patty could walk up and down staircases on his head. Believe it or not: Slater Barron created a portrait of John Wayne out of laundry lint. Believe it or not: A company based on sharing such oddities with the public is thriving in today's entertainment market, which is otherwise trending toward the elaborate and the high-tech. Ripley Entertainment, the Orlando, Fla.-based chain that operates 38 attractions in 12 countries, says it's enjoying a banner year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2008 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Five years after his retirement, ex-firefighter Tom Bramell still likes to visit Station No. 6 for old times' sake, whistling in amazement at all the changes -- the strange faces and slick high-tech engines. But one thing remains exactly the same, and it's what Bramell misses the most about his firefighting days. The sturdy little object hangs from the ceiling in the firehouse's engine bay, emitting its familiar faint orange glow. He calls it the long-lived lightbulb of Livermore.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1986 | KRISTINE MCKENNA
Curtis Ripley's paintings are like Agatha Christy mystery novels: clinically neat puzzles, head games played for no reason other than to pass the time. Who'll be the first to correctly organize the data and make the mental computer sing Bingo!? The clues are all in place: recurring motifs (tables, knives, fruit, women depicted as goddesses); references to art of the past (Francis Bacon, the sculpture of ancient Greece and Rome); enigmatic titles ("Madame X," "Bathsheba").
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2000 | NORINE DRESSER
Seven years ago, the Ripley Entertainment headquarters placed two 5-foot-tall hand-carved ebony statues from the Baule tribesmen of the African Ivory Coast in front of their offices in Orlando, Fla. One depicted a king holding a short sword in one hand and a mango in the other. The female counterpart held a newborn infant. The Baule believe that if a woman or her spouse touches either one of the statues, pregnancy will occur.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1996 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two women were mesmerized by the pair of ebony statues that graced the lobby of Ripley's Believe It or Not! museum. The reason for their fascination was the same. Their actions, however, were completely different. No way was Kelly Lin of Anaheim going anywhere near the pointy-head figures, one male, the other female. Supposedly, they're fertility gods and legend has it that women who touch them get--Lin giggled nervously--pregnant.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
A gruesome photo gallery of men and women impaled by arrows, augers and pipes is gone from the Ripley's Believe It or Not museum in Hollywood. And don't expect to see any displays of medieval chastity belts or tongs used to torture victims of the Spanish Inquisition. These and other macabre oddities have been replaced by such exhibits as a painting of Marilyn Monroe made entirely of candy, a mounted two-headed calf and the world's smallest drivable car. It's all part of a new family-friendly look at 33 Ripley's Believe It or Not museums around the world.
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