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Ripple Effect

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NEWS
February 4, 1997 | James Gerstenzang
Even as the recycling habit takes hold across the nation, the footprints of a consuming society remain bold. And according to Northwest Environment Watch, an environmental group in Seattle, the impact may be even deeper than one might think. Fuel. Ketchup. Wires. Newspapers. Grain. Paint. The environmental group, calculating the ripple effect of each product, estimates that the living habits of the typical American ultimately consume 121 pounds of various resources each day.
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OPINION
March 26, 2014
Re “Religious rights case at high court could have a ripple effect,” March 24 The religious right wants to take us back to the good old days when women were denied access to birth control and contraception. The fundamentalists in all religions have this in common: They discriminate against women, and they want to control them. The Supreme Court must decide whether for-profit companies, because of the religious objections of the owners, can deny employees the health coverage to which they are entitled by law. Hobby Lobby has 13,000 employees from all walks of life and religious persuasions.
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NEWS
September 12, 2001
The terrorist attacks on the East Coast sent a cross-continental tremor throughout California, disrupting work, play and the millions of individual routines that make up a normal day. Military personnel throughout the state were placed on alert and airports closed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Some of the country's best known authors and illustrators of children's books have signed a letter addressed to President Obama with a simple message: Too much standardized testing is causing children to lose their love of books. More than 100 authors and illustrators have signed the letter , including Judy Blume and Jules Feiffer. The campaign was organized by the National Center for Fair & Open Testing (FairTest), an advocacy group. “We are alarmed at the negative impact of excessive school testing mandates, including your Administration's own initiatives, on children's love of reading and literature,” reads the letter.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | Kenneth Turan, FILM CRITIC
"Revanche," a darkly compelling film from Austria, can be viewed as either a thriller with psychological overtones or a psychological drama with thriller elements. Either way, its carefully plotted, convincing scenario will leave you with a lot on your mind. That's because writer-director Gotz Spielmann has given a lot of thought to the implications of genre material. He's made a film which makes use of coincidence but refuses to indulge in facile characterizations or easy plot choices.
SPORTS
June 10, 2009
BUSINESS
August 16, 2011 | By Faye Fiore and Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
Barbara Ott works three days a week at a jewelry store in the heart of historic Leesburg. Her husband is in business development. Their two children are grown and their income is about as high as it's ever been. They figured that with the kids launched they'd be eating out more. Not so — only about twice a month these days. Vacation? Not this year. And the new upstairs carpeting will have to wait. Nothing says they can't indulge a little the way they had dreamed — except the feeling that things are bad and about to get worse.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1995 | Jack Searles
Ventura County's economy has suffered a loss totaling at least $68 million as a result of damage inflicted on the county's farms thus far by this month's storms, an official estimates. According to a preliminary estimate last week, crop losses alone totaled more than $22.7 million, county Agricultural Commissioner W. Earl McPhail reports.
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | TOM FURLONG and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writers
Some home buyers Thursday suddenly found themselves unable to get new homeowner insurance, and car dealers fretted that auto insurance might dry up as insurance companies reacted to the passage of Proposition 103. Lenders generally will not finance the purchase of a home or automobile until consumers have obtained insurance to protect the property against fire, theft or other damage.
SPORTS
December 18, 1997 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justin Fargas, one of the nation's most prized high school running backs, was watching a USC football practice late last summer when a golf cart pulled up and whisked him away. Trojan football coach John Robinson was the driver. Robinson acted as chauffeur for the Sherman Oaks Notre Dame High senior. The two had begun to develop a strong bond. "I really like Coach Robinson," Fargas said Tuesday night, after learning that Robinson was being fired as USC's coach. "I had a lot of respect for him.
OPINION
June 27, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Supporters of equality for gays and lesbians are exulting in Wednesday's rulings by the Supreme Court, and we share in their celebration. Although the court did not rule, as we had hoped, that all prohibitions on same-sex marriage violate the Constitution, its invalidation of part of the Defense of Marriage Act dramatically advances the cause of marriage equality. So does its ruling that proponents of California's Proposition 8 lacked legal standing to challenge a federal judge's holding that the initiative was unconstitutional.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2013 | By Matthew Fleischer
In early April, while making the promotional rounds for "Oblivion," Morgan Freeman made an appearance on the “Ask Me Anything” section of the popular social news and entertainment website Reddit. For those unfamiliar with “Ask Me Anything," or AMA, the conceit is quite simple: a poster announces their presence in a message board-like setting, and anonymous fans and curiosity seekers from across the Internet ask them questions -- or ignore them entirely -- as they see fit. AMAs that catch on inevitably include some questions that are thoughtful and earnest, some that are rude and others just bizarre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
The sharp workplace comedy "Price Check" is a you-are-there slip-and-slide that follows a supermarket chain's pricing department exec whose life gets upended by a whirlwind new boss. Pete Cozy (Eric Mabius) would rather 9-to-5 it and spend time with his homemaker wife, Sara (Annie Parisse), and toddler son than climb the corporate ladder. But when live-wire - and uncensored toughie - Susan Felders (Parker Posey, flat-out terrific) swoops in from corporate to recharge the firm's ailing Long Island division, this not-quite "devil in Prada" promotes a reluctant Pete to be her trusty second.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2011 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
The Federal Reserve and four other central banks moved to inject billions of U.S. dollars into Europe's troubled banking system, giving a dose of confidence to investors who have grown worried about the ripple effects of the Greek debt crisis. The coordinated action is intended to give large European banks ample access to dollars, thus heading off the risk of a lending crunch that could gum up the credit markets and worsen the global economy. European banks, particularly in France, have had trouble raising dollars from U.S. investors and financial institutions, which are scared off by the Europeans' heavy exposure to Greece.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2011 | By Faye Fiore and Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
Barbara Ott works three days a week at a jewelry store in the heart of historic Leesburg. Her husband is in business development. Their two children are grown and their income is about as high as it's ever been. They figured that with the kids launched they'd be eating out more. Not so — only about twice a month these days. Vacation? Not this year. And the new upstairs carpeting will have to wait. Nothing says they can't indulge a little the way they had dreamed — except the feeling that things are bad and about to get worse.
OPINION
March 11, 2011 | By Shannon Beebe
It has become apparent that real piracy is far different from the lighthearted subject sometimes portrayed in popular culture, and the problem is growing much worse. Besides the tragic cost in lives, the U.S., many other nations and NATO spent roughly $2 billion combined last year to safeguard the busy international sea lanes off the Horn of Africa from Somali pirates. According to the International Maritime Bureau, "hijackings off the coast of Somalia accounted for 92% of all ship seizures last year," and the price tag does not include the costs of reallocating critical military resources.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2011 | By Alana Semuels and Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Consumers are already seeing the fallout from turmoil in the Middle East and North Africa every time they fill their gas tanks. It's what they don't see that's the bigger worry for the U.S. economy. From the farm to the factory, businesses are facing higher costs to grow the nation's food, ship goods and manufacture products at a time when they're already cautious about hiring new employees or placing big orders. The added burden of sustained fuel price increases could slow the nation's already sluggish economic growth, analysts said.
OPINION
February 16, 2011 | By Ellen Lust
The popular uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt have inspired widespread dissent across the Middle East and left leaders desperately seeking to calm unrest in their own countries. Many regimes have increased subsidies and wages, with some even giving cash handouts. And they have coupled economic measures with political ones: promises to lift emergency rule in Algeria, suspension of proposed constitutional amendments that would extend the president's term in Yemen, a call for new Palestinian elections, and the appointment of a new prime minister in Jordan.
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