Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRique Pantoja
IN THE NEWS

Rique Pantoja

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1992 | JANICE L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rique Pantoja has been a fixture on the international jazz scene for years, having toured and recorded with Lee Ritenour and Sadao Watanabe as well as with the late Chet Baker. But the Brazilian composer, keyboardist and guitarist has yet to become widely known in the United States. "I'm having to pay my dues again," said Pantoja, who moved from Brazil to Los Angeles last summer. Pantoja began making inroads long before he settled in this country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The ultimate compliment you can pay Rique Pantoja is to play one of his tunes. The Brazilian keyboardist-composer has written hundreds of songs since he began composing at age 18, numbers that have been performed or recorded by such artists as trumpeters Chet Baker and Randy Brecker and saxophonist Ernie Watts. "A composer is so grateful when he discovers that other people are playing his tunes," said Pantoja, 36, who was born in Rio de Janeiro and has been living in Northridge for eight months.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The ultimate compliment you can pay Rique Pantoja is to play one of his tunes. The Brazilian keyboardist-composer has written hundreds of songs since he began composing at age 18, numbers that have been performed or recorded by such artists as trumpeters Chet Baker and Randy Brecker and saxophonist Ernie Watts. "A composer is so grateful when he discovers that other people are playing his tunes," said Pantoja, 36, who was born in Rio de Janeiro and has been living in Northridge for eight months.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rique Pantoja has ridden the current wave of pop-jazz artists from his Brazilian homeland into new waters. Unlike Djvan and Ivan Lins, whose pop stylings are firmly anchored in the traditions of their South American country, Pantoja has embraced American jazz-pop fusion, while retaining more subtle flavors of Brazilian music in his electric hybrid.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rique Pantoja has ridden the current wave of pop-jazz artists from his Brazilian homeland into new waters. Unlike Djvan and Ivan Lins, whose pop stylings are firmly anchored in the traditions of their South American country, Pantoja has embraced American jazz-pop fusion, while retaining more subtle flavors of Brazilian music in his electric hybrid.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
High-spirited musical energy was the order of the day at the opening performance of the Brazilian Summer Festival '96 on Saturday at the John Anson Ford Theatre. Appropriately, the capacity crowd's revelry hit its peak in a climactic number by Josias & Sambrasil, a roaring samba that brought more than 100 fans to the stage to join the G-stringed, feathered dancers in a hip-swinging, foot-tapping dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2001 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guitar and voice make a natural combination, but one seldom picked up by more classically oriented performers, despite a substantial and intriguing literature. Hometown heroes Christopher Parkening and Jubilant Sykes made a convincing case for the pairing in a spirited and broadly satisfying recital Saturday at Royce Hall. Of course, their "Braziliana" program did draw heavily on music with strong vernacular roots, Brazil in this case being more a state of mind than of geography.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, Corinne Flocken is a free-lance writer who regularly covers Kid Stuff for The Times Orange County Edition.
Years ago, when Diane Ferlatte tried to interest her young son in bedtime stories, she first had to vanquish a formidable opponent: television. "He was totally engrossed in TV," explained Ferlatte, an Oakland resident. "He literally had no attention span for stories. "So I started changing what I was reading and my style of reading. I put in more pauses; I became the characters. Ultimately I let go of reading altogether and just started telling them."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bassist Abraham Laboriel and saxophonist Justo Almario have a history together. Friends since their days about 25 years ago at the Berklee School of Music in Boston, they have continued their musical relationship, appearing on each other's albums and at club and concert dates. So when they come together in a group using both their names, as they did Saturday at the San Juan Capistrano Regional Library, one expects a feel-good, family affair. And that's exactly what one got.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2001
Last year's inaugural Audiotistic festival drew a big crowd in San Bernardino for an ambitious blend of often segregated dance-minded subcultures. This year it moves to the Long Beach Convention Center for another round of mixing, in every sense of the word. Common and Jurassic 5 head the hip-hop contingent, while Roger Sanchez, Derrick Carter and LTJ Bukem are among the dance-music delegation. * Audiotistic, Long Beach Convention & Entertainment Center, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, 4 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1992 | JANICE L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rique Pantoja has been a fixture on the international jazz scene for years, having toured and recorded with Lee Ritenour and Sadao Watanabe as well as with the late Chet Baker. But the Brazilian composer, keyboardist and guitarist has yet to become widely known in the United States. "I'm having to pay my dues again," said Pantoja, who moved from Brazil to Los Angeles last summer. Pantoja began making inroads long before he settled in this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1995 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here's some good end-of-the-year news: With three successful locations in the San Fernando Valley, Poquito Mas, "the original Baja taco stand," has jumped over the hills to West Hollywood. In a mini-mall just east of Ben Frank's, this tiny, spanking new restaurant announces itself with the mouthwatering scent of grilling steak. Inside, read an overhead menu and order at a counter under red galvanized tin roofing. "No lard," reads the receipt we're handed. "No MSG. No cans.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The rich, endlessly varied treasure trove of Brazilian music provides yet another splendid reward this weekend in the Brazilian Summer Festival '96 at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre. The event is the latest in a string of Southland performances--including recent appearances by two brilliant composer-performers, Ivan Lins and Gilberto Gil at the House of Blues--illustrating the enormous range of music originating in South America's largest nation.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|