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Risa Bramon Garcia

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1999
all day Movies Veteran casting director Risa Bramon Garcia makes her feature film directorial debut with "200 Cigarettes," an ensemble comedy about a motley assortment of punks, rockers and wannabes searching for a New Year's Eve party in New York's East Village (the year is 1981).
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1999
all day Movies Veteran casting director Risa Bramon Garcia makes her feature film directorial debut with "200 Cigarettes," an ensemble comedy about a motley assortment of punks, rockers and wannabes searching for a New Year's Eve party in New York's East Village (the year is 1981).
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1998 | Michele Willens, Michele Willens is a writer based in New York
Actress Gaby Hoffman, dressed in every color known to punk rockers in the early '80s, looks up at the street sign in New York's East Village and stops short. "I'm not moving from this corner," she screams in a thick Long Island accent to her friend crossing the notorious Avenue B. "Something terrible is going to happen if you cross that street!" "I'm going to that party!" yells back Christina Ricci, in the same Long Island accent and dressed in equally cheesy style.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1998 | Michele Willens, Michele Willens is a writer based in New York
Actress Gaby Hoffman, dressed in every color known to punk rockers in the early '80s, looks up at the street sign in New York's East Village and stops short. "I'm not moving from this corner," she screams in a thick Long Island accent to her friend crossing the notorious Avenue B. "Something terrible is going to happen if you cross that street!" "I'm going to that party!" yells back Christina Ricci, in the same Long Island accent and dressed in equally cheesy style.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When people celebrate New Year's Eve, they feel they've just got to have fun--and that of course means having someone important in your life to enjoy it with.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1994 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Act One--Evening B," the second installment in a festival of original one-act plays sponsored by Showtime, continues to prove entertaining and provoking. "Tom and Jerry," the best play so far in the series, is a comedy of the darkest hue that centers around the business-as-usual relationship of two mob hit-men.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1999
Celia Cruz has favored nightclubs such as the Conga Room and the House of Blues in recent years, but no small room could contain the pipes power represented by the salsa matriarch and the evening's co-star, Nuyorican diva India. The L.A. Sports Arena concert also features one of Latin pop's hot newcomers, Puerto Rican merengue singer Elvis Crespo. * Celia Cruz, India and Elvis Crespo, Los Angeles Sports Arena, 3939 S. Figueroa St., 8 p.m. $40. (213) 748-6136.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
What exactly is "A Guy Thing"? According to the movie bearing this title, which contrary to its claims is neither romantic nor comedic, it means a guy, Paul (Jason Lee), with a head and a will as indomitable as a soft-boiled egg. It means a guy who has committed to marrying a thoroughbred, Karen (Selma Blair), doubtless because her imperiousness and snug preppy coordinates give her the vaguely menacing vibe of a strict schoolteacher.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1993 | DON SHIRLEY
Hollywood often shops for material and talent in L.A.'s theaters, and occasionally a studio or network will invest in an individual stage production. But Showtime, the cable channel, is going one step further. It's sponsoring an international search for one-act plays and plans to present the results of that search in a festival next spring at the Met Theatre in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Some people think theater should have nothing to do with its bastard grandchild, TV. Is it unseemly for television people to use the stage to develop "product"? Not at all, if you look at this year's Act One Festival at the MET Theatre, produced by Showtime, in association with Paramount Network TV, Viacom and Grammnet, product-seeking TV companies all.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Theater lovers may sometimes look down their noses at television, but the first installment of "Act One '95," the Met Theatre series funded by several TV production companies, should make that stage snobbery fade like so many summer reruns. It's true that this one-act festival, now in its second year, has been made with more in mind than just the thrill of hearing live applause. The sponsors--led by Showtime Networks Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY
When F. Scott Fitzgerald observed that there were no second acts in American lives, perhaps he was foreseeing the current smaller-theater scene in Los Angeles. Every week seems to bring yet another one-act festival. One indication of the glut is that two different, unrelated festivals used the umbrella title "Act One." Probably the most prominent festival so far was the Showtime-financed "Act One," which presented works by 15 writers from May 20-July 10 at the Met Theatre.
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