Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRise And Fall
IN THE NEWS

Rise And Fall

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By James Oliphant
For the longest time, it ending like this was hard to envision. Not Sarah Palin's decision to forgo a presidential run. That had long taken on its own kind of inevitability. But that when she finally got around to making her non-candidacy official, there were so many shrugged shoulders and vacant stares. Much of America, it seemed, even a majority of Republicans, had long moved on. Still, the decision caused a momentary sensation - a flash of excitement, as if the old Sarah, market-moving Sarah - was back.  But the death of Steve Jobs quickly relegated her to a media afterthought, as she had been in recent months.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 2, 2014 | By Jonathan Guthrie
When asked how he went bankrupt, a character in Ernest Hemingway's novel "The Sun Also Rises" replies: "Two ways. Gradually and then suddenly. " This neat summation of how business failure creeps up on victims is quoted in "Big Bang Disruption: Strategy In The Age of Devastating Innovation," a new book with more than a whiff of apocalyptic prophecy about it. The book, published by Portfolio Hardcover, plays to the belief that technology has...
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
We're still more than a month away from the beginning of season three of HBO's "Game of Thrones," but it's definitely on the horizon. There's a new teaser trailer (below), which shows a number of scenes being filmed. And there are the short interviews. Peter Dinklage talks about how many characters get killed off. "There are a lot of tremendous new characters coming forward," says executive producer/writer D.B. Weiss, "and we're very excited about the way that new blood shakes up the picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Hollow Crown," which begins Friday on PBS under the venerable standard of its "Great Performances," comprises four Shakespeare plays, often called the Henriad as there is a King Henry (Henry IV, then Henry V) in each of them. It's too much to say that this is what television was made for - since it was also made for professional wrestling and situation comedies - but it is part of its original promise and compact, that ennobling great works of art (ennobling in their greatness, that is, not in any didactic way)
SPORTS
December 1, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
ELIAN HERRERA , 27, infielder/outfiedler Final 2012 stats: .251, 26 runs, 17 RBIs, 10 doubles with .340 on-base and .332 slugging percentages in 187 at-bats. Contract status: Under team control. The good: In his first 31 games with the Dodgers, he hit .305 with a .407 on-base percentage and .390 slugging percentage. Hit .321 at Dodger Stadium. Highly versatile, he played all three outfield positions, third, second and even one game at shortstop, while hitting in six different spots in the lineup.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2009 | Marc Olsen
Hurtling across the 10 years from 1967 to 1977, "The Baader Meinhof Complex" tells with exacting detail the roots, formation, revolutionary rise and spectacular fall of the West German terrorist network called the Red Army Faction. Popularly known as the Baader Meinhof Group, it sprang from the late-'60s student protest movement, launching an anti-capitalist, anti-imperialist campaign that included robberies, kidnappings, bombings and murders that held the nation spellbound. If there were an analogous American story, it would include elements of the Weather Underground, the Manson family, Patty Hearst and the Symbionese Liberation Army and the shootings at Kent State.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2011 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Rise and Fall of Ancient Egypt Toby Wilkinson Random House: 615 pp., $35 Published barely a month after Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak was forced to resign, Toby Wilkinson's magisterial "The Rise and Fall of Ancient Egypt" has a news hook that its author presumably did not foresee. Yet his somber appraisal of the world's first nation-state paints a disquieting picture of cultural, economic and political strategies that sustained a brutal centralized authority for 3,000 years ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1997
We are no longer investing in companies and their profits but in the stock market and its rise and fall. ROBERT BINDER, Claremont
SCIENCE
March 29, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The oldest written fragment of the Nibelungen myth, an oral tale later standardized into the most famous Germanic text of the Middle Ages, has been found in a monastery in Austria. The Nibelungen Saga, a 2,439-verse epic that tells of the rise and fall of the Burgundian empire, is considered the most important text of the Middle High German language.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By F. Kathleen Foley
From his turns in early Justin Tanner plays to his long-running role on the television sitcom, “3rd Rock from the Sun,” French Stewart has established himself as an immediately recognizable character actor, with “tired” and true tics -- knowing squint, twee hand gestures -- that have become synonymous with his persona. Now forget any preconceptions you may have had about this actor. In “Stoneface: The Rise and Fall and Rise of Buster Keaton,” in its world premiere at Sacred Fools, Stewart has left his bag of tricks behind the stage door.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Robert Abele
Alex Winter's documentary "Downloaded" charts the rise and fall of Napster, the upstart file-sharing music-community hub that made founders Shawn Fanning and Sean Parker into either Information Age heroes or criminal masterminds, depending on how you see technology as a force for cultural openness. The movie prefers the hero moniker, presenting this '90s story as a rise-and-fall tragedy in which Napster - had it not been hampered by crippling lawsuits stemming from the recording industry's siege mentality about its business - could have become iTunes before iTunes.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By Shan Li
Even the tooth fairy is feeling more generous as the economy recovers. The average amount that the tooth fairy (or parents, for those who scoff at Santa and the Easter bunny) gave to kids jumped 15.2% to $2.42 last year, up from $2.10 in 2011, according to an annual poll conducted by Delta Dental. Quiz: How much do you know about California's economy? Dubbed the Original Tooth Fairy Poll, it surveyed more than 1,200 primary caregivers for the average gift bestowed upon a child who lost a tooth.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
We're still more than a month away from the beginning of season three of HBO's "Game of Thrones," but it's definitely on the horizon. There's a new teaser trailer (below), which shows a number of scenes being filmed. And there are the short interviews. Peter Dinklage talks about how many characters get killed off. "There are a lot of tremendous new characters coming forward," says executive producer/writer D.B. Weiss, "and we're very excited about the way that new blood shakes up the picture.
SPORTS
December 1, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
ELIAN HERRERA , 27, infielder/outfiedler Final 2012 stats: .251, 26 runs, 17 RBIs, 10 doubles with .340 on-base and .332 slugging percentages in 187 at-bats. Contract status: Under team control. The good: In his first 31 games with the Dodgers, he hit .305 with a .407 on-base percentage and .390 slugging percentage. Hit .321 at Dodger Stadium. Highly versatile, he played all three outfield positions, third, second and even one game at shortstop, while hitting in six different spots in the lineup.
SCIENCE
November 12, 2012 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
Argument has raged for decades over what doomed the ancient Maya civilization and spurred its people to abandon their awe-inspiring temples and pyramids in the rain forests of Mexico and Central America. Warfare, disease, social unrest and over-farming have all been cited as potential factors in the decline of a culture that was scientifically and culturally advanced for 750 years. A new study bolsters the theory that large-scale climate change was responsible for the society's demise - and argues that changes in global weather patterns were also responsible for its rapid rise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2012 | By Hector Becerra, Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives, Los Angeles Times
George Perez started at the bottom of Cudahy city government, cleaning toilets as a $6.50-an-hour a janitor. He was ambitious, though, and in eight years was elected to the City Council. Six years later, with no college education or management training, Perez was running the southeast L.A. County town as city manager. He became the embodiment of power in the working-class immigrant city along the 710 Freeway. His up-from-the-bootstraps story made him a hero to some - a kind of "Mr. Cudahy," with a tattoo of the city seal on his right leg to prove it. He served as emcee at town hall meetings, where door prizes such as blenders, fans and heaters were raffled off. When people came to City Hall to complain, Perez sometimes met them personally.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1989
I read with empathy Gregg Barrios' extraordinary account of the rise and fall of actress Carol Ohmart ("The Last Starlet," Jan. 1 and 8). Carol has been a friend of mine since we acted together in "The Wild Party" in 1956. At a very low point in my own fortunes in the late '50s, she showed herself to be a warm and caring person. One does not forget these things. This was at a time when most of Hollywood had turned its back on me. I would say to her now that with persistence and determination and a never-give-up spirit, anything is possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2011
MOVIES Rhino Records in Westwood was a church for wax fanatics from the time it opened in 1973 until its sad shutter in 2005. During that time it expanded to become a label that catered to the offbeat tastes of audiophiles, much like its flagship record shop. Now, a new documentary is out about the shop's rise and fall and is aptly titled, "Rhino Resurrected: The Incredibly Strange Story of the World's Most Famous Record Store. " The film will celebrate its world premiere at the Cinefamily, 611 N. Fairfax Ave., L.A. 2:30 p.m. Sat. $12. (323)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Seven years before she dazzled international audiences as the amoral Lulu in G.W. Pabst's 1929 German masterpiece "Pandora's Box," Louise Brooks was a willful, intelligent and beautiful 15-year-old girl living in Wichita, Kan. Summer 1922 changed Brooks' life. She left home accompanied by a provincial 36-year-old housewife named Alice Mills and traveled by train to New York City so she could attend the Denishawn school of modern dance run by Ruth St. Denis and Ted Shawn. Mills returned that summer to Wichita and vanished from the life of Brooks, who would shortly become one of the icons of the silent screen.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|