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Risen Star Horse

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July 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Risen Star, winner of this year's Preakness and Belmont Stakes, is being retired to stud, co-owner and trainer Louis Roussel III said Saturday. "I made a decision for the best of Risen Star and have always considered it best that we retire him," Roussel said. The son of Secretariat, whose 14 3/4-length victory in the Belmont stamped him as one of the nation's dominant horses, ran the race with an injured right foreleg, suffered in a pre-race workout.
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SPORTS
July 6, 1988 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
The dispute between the owners of Risen Star and Eddie Delahoussaye ended Tuesday when the owners agreed to pay the jockey the $100,000 he said he deserved from the colt's million-dollar Triple Crown bonus. Terry Lipham, Delahoussaye's agent, said that the jockey would also be paid his expenses for riding Risen Star in the Kentucky Derby, the Preakness and the Belmont Stakes, which Delahoussaye said amounted to about $12,000.
SPORTS
July 5, 1988 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Louie Roussel had bad news for Eddie Delahoussaye and bad news for himself Monday. Roussel, the co-owner and trainer of Risen Star, will not pay jockey Eddie Delahoussaye a disputed $100,000 share of the $1-million Triple Crown bonus, and Roussel also said that the Preakness and Belmont Stakes winner will miss the Travers, hinting that the 3-year-old colt's career may be over.
SPORTS
July 3, 1988 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Eddie Delahoussaye, who rode Risen Star to victory in the Preakness and Belmont Stakes, said he has not been paid what he believes is his $100,000 share of a $1-million Triple Crown bonus. For accumulating the most points in the Triple Crown races, Risen Star earned $1 million, besides the first-place purses of $413,700 in the Preakness and $303,720 in the Belmont. Delahoussaye also rode Risen Star to a third-place finish in the Kentucky Derby.
SPORTS
July 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Risen Star, winner of this year's Preakness and Belmont Stakes, is being retired to stud, co-owner and trainer Louis Roussel III said Saturday. "I made a decision for the best of Risen Star and have always considered it best that we retire him," Roussel said. The son of Secretariat, whose 14 3/4-length victory in the Belmont stamped him as one of the nation's dominant horses, ran the race with an injured right foreleg, suffered in a pre-race workout.
SPORTS
July 6, 1988 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
The dispute between the owners of Risen Star and Eddie Delahoussaye ended Tuesday when the owners agreed to pay the jockey the $100,000 he said he deserved from the colt's million-dollar Triple Crown bonus. Terry Lipham, Delahoussaye's agent, said that the jockey would also be paid his expenses for riding Risen Star in the Kentucky Derby, the Preakness and the Belmont Stakes, which Delahoussaye said amounted to about $12,000.
SPORTS
June 12, 1988 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Risen Star should be called Secretariat Jr. now. Fifteen years ago, Secretariat, a red horse who had brought racing out of the doldrums with brilliant victories in the Kentucky Derby and Preakness, became the first Triple Crown winner in a quarter-century by smashing both his opponents and the clock in the Belmont Stakes. Secretariat won the Belmont by 31 lengths, and just as incredibly, his time of 2:24 for the 1 1/2 miles made confetti of the 2:26 3/5 record that Gallant Man had run in 1957.
SPORTS
June 13, 1988 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
It will be fitting if Risen Star winds up in the already well-stocked barn of trainer Charlie Whittingham late this year. Whittingham had a yen for Risen Star, the winner of the Preakness and Belmont Stakes, even before the horse ran a race. Risen Star was only a yearling when he was consigned to the 1986 Keeneland summer sale, the creme de la creme of horse auctions.
SPORTS
July 5, 1988 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Louie Roussel had bad news for Eddie Delahoussaye and bad news for himself Monday. Roussel, the co-owner and trainer of Risen Star, will not pay jockey Eddie Delahoussaye a disputed $100,000 share of the $1-million Triple Crown bonus, and Roussel also said that the Preakness and Belmont Stakes winner will miss the Travers, hinting that the 3-year-old colt's career may be over.
SPORTS
July 3, 1988 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Eddie Delahoussaye, who rode Risen Star to victory in the Preakness and Belmont Stakes, said he has not been paid what he believes is his $100,000 share of a $1-million Triple Crown bonus. For accumulating the most points in the Triple Crown races, Risen Star earned $1 million, besides the first-place purses of $413,700 in the Preakness and $303,720 in the Belmont. Delahoussaye also rode Risen Star to a third-place finish in the Kentucky Derby.
SPORTS
June 13, 1988 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
It will be fitting if Risen Star winds up in the already well-stocked barn of trainer Charlie Whittingham late this year. Whittingham had a yen for Risen Star, the winner of the Preakness and Belmont Stakes, even before the horse ran a race. Risen Star was only a yearling when he was consigned to the 1986 Keeneland summer sale, the creme de la creme of horse auctions.
SPORTS
June 12, 1988 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Risen Star should be called Secretariat Jr. now. Fifteen years ago, Secretariat, a red horse who had brought racing out of the doldrums with brilliant victories in the Kentucky Derby and Preakness, became the first Triple Crown winner in a quarter-century by smashing both his opponents and the clock in the Belmont Stakes. Secretariat won the Belmont by 31 lengths, and just as incredibly, his time of 2:24 for the 1 1/2 miles made confetti of the 2:26 3/5 record that Gallant Man had run in 1957.
SPORTS
May 7, 1988 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Thumbnail sketches of the 17 horses in today's 114th Kentucky Derby (in order of post position): 1. RISEN STAR--"This horse could win if he can overcome his trainer," the trainer of another Derby horse said of loud Louie Roussel, asking for anonymity. Roussel, who also owns half of Risen Star, has been training since 1970, but has only started horses in just over 1,000 races.
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