Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRising Sun Movie
IN THE NEWS

Rising Sun Movie

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1993 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In May, Lan Nguyen, a 30-year-old Vietnamese doctoral student at USC, responded to a flyer advertising a screening of "Rising Sun," a movie based on Michael Crichton's controversial best-selling murder-mystery, which illuminates the burgeoning Japanese economic and political influence on American shores. Too late, said the independent marketing company coordinating the event: The preview for the film--scheduled for release by 20th Century Fox on Friday--was closed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1993 | DAVID FERRELL and K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Michael Crichton's latest screen adaptation, "Rising Sun," opened Friday in Westwood, but this time the chief protagonists were from Japan, not the Jurassic period. And in a tumultuous modern world, protesters greeted the film by taking to the streets, fearful that its unflattering portrayal of the Japanese might contribute to escalating hate crime. "The rise in Japan-bashing and anti-immigrant sentiment has a direct link to violence against Asian-Americans," said Kathryn K.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Rising Sun" has gotten everything backward. Mystifying when it should be clear and clear when it should be mystifying, it is the murkiest, most unsatisfying of thrillers. And the biggest mystery of all is how a project that appeared to have so much going for it could have gone so determinedly astray. For the Michael Crichton novel "Rising Sun" (citywide) is based on was more than a top bestseller. Its story of how the investigation of an L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Rising Sun" has gotten everything backward. Mystifying when it should be clear and clear when it should be mystifying, it is the murkiest, most unsatisfying of thrillers. And the biggest mystery of all is how a project that appeared to have so much going for it could have gone so determinedly astray. For the Michael Crichton novel "Rising Sun" (citywide) is based on was more than a top bestseller. Its story of how the investigation of an L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If readers were shocked by Michael Crichton's politically charged best-selling novel "Rising Sun," they're in for an even bigger shock this summer: In the movie version, set for release in mid-July, there's a new villain. And the man responsible is director Philip Kaufman, who, in rewriting Crichton's own screenplay, changed the identity and ethnicity of the murderer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992
Re Pete Earley's latest book, "The Hot House," (Feb. 16): The Bureau of Prisons believes that the public should be made aware of several facts. Specifically, the book gives the average citizen an interesting but narrow view of life and work in a high-security prison. It's a good book as far as it goes--catering to America's fascination with the criminal extreme. But it falls short in several areas, distorting a great deal of the picture it attempts to portray. Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1993 | DAVID FERRELL and K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Michael Crichton's latest screen adaptation, "Rising Sun," opened Friday in Westwood, but this time the chief protagonists were from Japan, not the Jurassic period. And in a tumultuous modern world, protesters greeted the film by taking to the streets, fearful that its unflattering portrayal of the Japanese might contribute to escalating hate crime. "The rise in Japan-bashing and anti-immigrant sentiment has a direct link to violence against Asian-Americans," said Kathryn K.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A coalition of Asian-Americans is disavowing the movie adaptation of Michael Crichton's politically charged thriller "Rising Sun" because the producing studio refuses to include a disclaimer asking audiences not to assume "all Japanese people are trying to take over America."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1992 | ELAINE DUTKA
Since hitting the bookstores on Valentine's Day, Michael Crichton's "Rising Sun"--a controversial thriller set in a Los Angeles that is economically, politically and culturally saturated by the Japanese--has topped the bestseller lists for two weeks. With 350,000 hardcover copies in print, it's the author's most successful novel to date.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1993 | GENE SEYMOUR, Gene Seymour is a staff writer for Newsday
"Rising Sun," the bestseller about murder and intrigue in the Los Angeles headquarters of a Japanese conglomerate, is characterized by its author, Michael Crichton, as a "wake-up call" for an America he believes is in danger of becoming a second-rate power. Philip Kaufman, who directed the filmed adaptation of "Rising Sun" opening Friday, agrees America needs a "wake-up call"--but a different kind.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1993 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In May, Lan Nguyen, a 30-year-old Vietnamese doctoral student at USC, responded to a flyer advertising a screening of "Rising Sun," a movie based on Michael Crichton's controversial best-selling murder-mystery, which illuminates the burgeoning Japanese economic and political influence on American shores. Too late, said the independent marketing company coordinating the event: The preview for the film--scheduled for release by 20th Century Fox on Friday--was closed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A coalition of Asian-Americans is disavowing the movie adaptation of Michael Crichton's politically charged thriller "Rising Sun" because the producing studio refuses to include a disclaimer asking audiences not to assume "all Japanese people are trying to take over America."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If readers were shocked by Michael Crichton's politically charged best-selling novel "Rising Sun," they're in for an even bigger shock this summer: In the movie version, set for release in mid-July, there's a new villain. And the man responsible is director Philip Kaufman, who, in rewriting Crichton's own screenplay, changed the identity and ethnicity of the murderer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992
Re Pete Earley's latest book, "The Hot House," (Feb. 16): The Bureau of Prisons believes that the public should be made aware of several facts. Specifically, the book gives the average citizen an interesting but narrow view of life and work in a high-security prison. It's a good book as far as it goes--catering to America's fascination with the criminal extreme. But it falls short in several areas, distorting a great deal of the picture it attempts to portray. Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1992 | ELAINE DUTKA
Since hitting the bookstores on Valentine's Day, Michael Crichton's "Rising Sun"--a controversial thriller set in a Los Angeles that is economically, politically and culturally saturated by the Japanese--has topped the bestseller lists for two weeks. With 350,000 hardcover copies in print, it's the author's most successful novel to date.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pity the poor American tourist who decided this was the summer to visit Japan. In a country where it has long been traumatic to buy things with dollars, the latest plunge in the U.S. currency to historic lows against the yen has made this experience seem almost surreal. A modest-sized room at Tokyo's Okura Hotel, for example, now costs $400 a day, and hotel room rates on the average are up more than 20% since February.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|