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OPINION
October 8, 2000
Like so many Americans, Shawn Hubler is apparently unwilling to accept the fact that life is not risk-free (Oct. 2). She criticizes Disney for weighing risks and trade-offs in the design of rides. Yet every one of us makes these same calculations every single day and few of us make safety concerns the highest priority in every decision we make. If we did, we'd never do anything for fear of injury. If Hubler is uncomfortable with the level of safety at Disneyland, perhaps she should just stay home (which might or might not actually be a safer alternative)
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WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Vincent Bevins
Between a cluster of bars in this small coastal town, middle-aged European men hover around dozens of fresh-faced Brazilian women in tight dresses. Around the corner, two girls who look to be in their teens flag down cars, signaling their availability to potential clients. Most such activity, however, seems confined to a small, seedy tourist strip, the last gasp of a bygone era. Natal, long known as a hot spot for sex tourism, has seen fewer problems in the wake of a national economic boom and concerted government efforts to cut back on the Carnaval nation's carnal image.
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NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Heart disease is a killer, and now researchers  say staying late at work could be one contributing factor. But here’s a note to the water-cooler crowd: It’s not just the workaholics who get heart attacks.  One in four  deaths in the U.S. are due to heart disease. Most of those deaths are from coronary heart disease , in which fatty material clogs arteries that deliver blood and oxygen to the heart. Some big risk factors, such as age and family history, can’t be changed.  But you can lower your risk—even at the office—with some lifestyle changes.
WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali and Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan - The fatal shooting of three Americans in a charity hospital Thursday punctuated a dismal new trend that has emerged in the waning months of the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan: Just as many foreign civilians are being killed as troops. The brazen attack by a police officer at the CURE International hospital in Kabul, which serves 37,000 Afghans a year, shocked even this war-weary city and seemed likely to diminish the already dwindling population of foreigners working in the capital.
NEWS
November 14, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Stress takes a toll on women's heart health. A study released Sunday found that women who report high stress on the job have a 40% increased risk of being diagnosed with heart disease. Researchers at Brigham & Women's Hospital in Boston looked at survey data from 17,415 women who were part of the Women's Health Study. These women were primarily white health professionals in their 50s. They were followed for more than 10 years. Job stress was defined as having a demanding job but little or no decision-making authority or opportunities to use one's creative or individual skills.
NEWS
October 6, 2010
Years spent in a noisy workplace may take a toll on both hearing and heart health. A study published Wednesday found that persistent noise in the workplace doubled the chances of an employee developing serious heart disease. Previous studies that have looked at the effect of loud noise on the heart have produced mixed results. For the new study, researchers examined a database of more than 6,000 employees ages 20 and older who were surveyed about lifestyle, occupation and health.
TRAVEL
April 27, 2008
My husband and I just returned from Israel and Egypt, and I want to shout from the rooftops that we had been misled about the risk of visiting these countries. We never felt afraid. The visible security in both countries is quite reassuring. I encourage people to relax and not be afraid to travel. Mona Shafer Edwards Los Angeles
SCIENCE
April 24, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Drinking more coffee may decrease your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, a new study shows. Researchers from Harvard University found that people who increased their coffee consumption by at least one cup per day over a period of years were 11% less likely to get Type 2 diabetes compared with people whose coffee-drinking habits didn't change. On the flip side, people who dialed back their coffee habit by at least one cup a day were 17% more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes.
SCIENCE
December 12, 2013 | By Alan Zarembo
Up to a fifth of U.S. service members who served in Iraq and Afghanistan have come home with a blast-related concussion or post-traumatic stress disorder - or both. A study published Wednesday in the journal JAMA Psychiatry helps detail the relationship between the two conditions. Marines who suffered mild traumatic brain injuries while deployed were roughly twice as likely to get PTSD, researchers found. One likely explanation is that the bomb blasts, the most common cause of brain injuries during the wars, are psychologically traumatizing as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1995
So now our public servants and advisers are trying to decide if Mr. (John M.W.) Moorlach and his staff are competent "to handle the $5-billion portfolio" of Orange County ("Adviser Urges Outside Money Manager for Now," April 7). That is a whole lot of money and caution is necessary in its investing. My concern is that the skill being sought is how to "maximize" return while "minimizing" risk. A noteworthy goal for any private investor, but this is public money for which, in my opinion, the guiding principle must be "minimize risk," period.
SCIENCE
April 24, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Drinking more coffee may decrease your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, a new study shows. Researchers from Harvard University found that people who increased their coffee consumption by at least one cup per day over a period of years were 11% less likely to get Type 2 diabetes compared with people whose coffee-drinking habits didn't change. On the flip side, people who dialed back their coffee habit by at least one cup a day were 17% more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes.
SCIENCE
April 23, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
The Food & Drug Administration is warning that injections of corticosteroids into the spine's epidural space -- an extremely common treatment for radiating back or neck pain -- in rare cases may result in loss of vision, stroke, paralysis and death. And that's even in the absence of fungal and other contamination introduced by compounding pharmacies that killed 48 people in 2012 and 2013. Physicians offering these injections to patients with back or neck pain should discuss these rare but serious risks with patients considering a jab of steroidal medication into the cerebrospinal fluid, the FDA said Wednesday.
SCIENCE
April 23, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Over a five-year period, a government-mandated tracking system in France showed that physicians in that country treated 1,979 patients for serious health problems associated with the use of marijuana, and nearly 2% of those encounters were with patients suffering from cardiovascular problems, including heart attack, cardiac arrhythmia and stroke, and circulation problems in the arms and legs. In roughly a quarter of those cases, the study found, the patient died. In the United States, when young and otherwise healthy patients show up in emergency departments with symptoms of heart attack, stroke, cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmia, physicians have frequently noted in case reports that these unusual patients are regular marijuana users.
SCIENCE
April 21, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
When oxygenated blood needs to squeeze through a narrowed space to get to the brain -- a condition called asymptomatic carotid stenosis -- mental performance may suffer, even in the absence of stroke, a new study suggests. In patients with diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease and worrisome cholesterol readings, physicians may test for buildup of plaque in the carotid artery, peering into the vessel at the nape of the neck with ultrasound. As plaque either builds up or breaks off and lodges deeper into the brain's vasculature, it can cause a stroke, a major cause of death and disability.
SPORTS
April 20, 2014 | By Broderick Turner
Maybe Game 2 isn't a must-win for the Clippers. Maybe this next first-round Western Conference playoff game against the Golden State Warriors is just a "definitely need to win" game. Maybe the Clippers could have won Game 1 if the officials had called Draymond Green for a foul on Chris Paul, as the NBA office on Sunday said should have happened Saturday. But the fact is, the Clippers are down 0-1 in the best-of-seven series. And with Game 2 Monday night at Staples Center, the Clippers have the opportunity to change the course of the series in which they gave up the home-court advantage to the Warriors.
WORLD
April 20, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
MUMBAI, India - Bill Burke, a 72-year-old mountaineer from Costa Mesa, was making his latest attempt to scale Mt. Everest's northern face when the news came of the deadliest avalanche ever on the world's highest peak. As many as 16 Nepalese mountain guides, all ethnic Sherpas, were killed Friday on the south side of the mountain, but Everest's fraternity of climbers and their guides is small. The father of Burke's Nepalese guide was among the dead; another Sherpa in his group lost two relatives, including a nephew.
NEWS
July 26, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
There's more reason to worry (about yourself, that is) if Dad had a heart attack than if he had a stroke, researchers have found. In a study published Tuesday in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, scientists at the University of Oxford in England showed that people are more likely to inherit the risk of having a heart attack than the risk of having a stroke. The team looked at data collected in England from 906 patients who'd suffered acute heart ailments such as a heart attack and 1,105 patients with acute cerebral events, which include stroke and transient ischemic attack (or mini-stroke)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1994
I am concerned not only about the NEXRAD radar tower, which has been built in my community, but for all communities where the National Weather Service has built or is planning to build these radar towers. There is a great debate among scientists concerning the health risks involved with chronic exposure to microwave radiation. I'm worried that the government is partaking in another project that has not been researched with enough accuracy or care to protect the health and lives of our children and families.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Andrea Chang
Sony is issuing a warning to users of its Vaio Fit 11A, telling them to stop using the laptops because the batteries could overheat and catch fire. According to the Wall Street Journal, the batteries made by Panasonic are found in nearly 26,000 Vaio computers. Sony has received three reports of batteries overheating, which caused partial burns to Vaio computers. VIDEO: Unboxing the Amazon Fire TV "The first incident was in Japan on March 19, followed by similar incidents on March 30 in Hong Kong and April 8 in China," the Journal reported , noting that Sony stopped selling the laptop at the beginning of this month.
TRAVEL
April 11, 2014 | By Myscha Theriault
Any traveler can get distracted - in fact, it's the rare traveler who doesn't. But when your attention is focused on other things, you may be leaving yourself wide open to theft and data breaches. From stashing your cash to selecting luggage, here are some of my favorite security solutions. How to carry cash: Carrying limited currency and keeping it in multiple locations keep your theft risk manageable. The storage strategies are as varied as the types of currencies you could carry, but a few stand out as being particularly secure.
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