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Risk Behavior

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1985 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Owners of gay bathhouses would be required to monitor activity in their establishments and throw out anyone engaging in "high-risk" sexual behavior that could lead to AIDS under guidelines proposed Tuesday by the county's chief health officer. The self-policing guidelines also would require that all areas within about 16 bathhouses operating in Los Angeles County be illuminated and that owners maintain a daily log of high-risk violations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
August 28, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Depression can look very different in men and women. And many of its hallmarks - rage, risk-taking, substance abuse and even workaholism - can hide in plain sight. Now researchers say that when these symptoms are factored into a diagnosis, the long-standing disparity between depression rates in men and women disappears. That conclusion overturns long-accepted statistics indicating that, over their lifetimes, women are 70% more likely to have major depression than men. In fact, when its symptoms are properly recognized in men, major depression may be even more common in men than in women, according to a study published Wednesday by the journal JAMA Psychiatry.
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NEWS
November 29, 1992 | BETH SHERMAN, NEWSDAY
Leading a double life would seem to be the exclusive domain of professional spies, fictional secret agents and undercover operatives with foreign accents. But seemingly ordinary men and women sometimes hide extraordinary secrets from those closest to them: their families, friends and co-workers. Consider the well-respected chief executive who embezzles funds from his company. The man with two wives and two sets of children who know nothing of one another's existence.
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A Spanish bullfighter was badly gored last week, the Associated Press reports, when the bull he was fighting rammed its left horn into his lower jaw, making his eyeball protrude. After being gored, 39-year-old bullfighter Juan Jose Padilla stood up, blood gushing from his face, and was helped from the arena. After a five-hour operation he may be left with facial paralysis and blindness in one eye. While Internet commenters are busy arguing the pros and cons of bullfighting (we'll let you guess which side 99% of the comments are on)
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A Spanish bullfighter was badly gored last week, the Associated Press reports, when the bull he was fighting rammed its left horn into his lower jaw, making his eyeball protrude. After being gored, 39-year-old bullfighter Juan Jose Padilla stood up, blood gushing from his face, and was helped from the arena. After a five-hour operation he may be left with facial paralysis and blindness in one eye. While Internet commenters are busy arguing the pros and cons of bullfighting (we'll let you guess which side 99% of the comments are on)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1998
Young gay males are more likely to engage in high-risk sexual behaviors if they have low self-esteem or live in areas with a high amount of homophobia, according to new research from behavioral scientist Craig Waldo of UC San Francisco. Waldo and his colleagues studied 302 young gay men living in Eugene, Ore., Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz, all communities with few gay community resources. The team used questionnaires to assess the subjects' self-image and sexual behaviors.
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Although dramatic changes in sexual behavior have occurred among homosexual men in certain cities with a high incidence of AIDS, high-risk behavior persists in some major cities and in areas with a low rate of the disease, according to a new unpublished report. The report, a draft of which was obtained by The Times, concluded that high-risk behavior among gay men is least common in San Francisco, the likely result of "community organization and intervention."
OPINION
June 26, 2002 | DAVID SATCHER, David Satcher, the U.S. surgeon general from 1998 to 2002, is a former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
After several years of steady decline in new AIDS cases and deaths and a recent stabilization of new HIV infections, our nation is beginning to see troubling regressions in some populations, particularly among gay and bisexual men and African Americans and Latinos.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
A committee of California health officials is quietly drafting guidelines for counties that may want to isolate "recalcitrant" AIDS patients who seem intent on continuing to engage in high-risk behaviors that may infect others with the AIDS virus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2003 | Daniel Costello, Special to The Times
Half a dozen HIV-positive people meet weekly for group therapy in a Long Beach conference room decorated with an American flag at one end and an "HIV Stops With Me" banner on the other. At a recent gathering, Quincy Edmonds, a muscular 33-year-old diagnosed with HIV nine years ago, ticked off some of the things he thinks can lead people like him to risky behavior that could spread the virus: depression, loneliness, drug abuse. "Thank you. Thank you for sharing that," a counselor said cheerily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2003 | Daniel Costello, Special to The Times
Half a dozen HIV-positive people meet weekly for group therapy in a Long Beach conference room decorated with an American flag at one end and an "HIV Stops With Me" banner on the other. At a recent gathering, Quincy Edmonds, a muscular 33-year-old diagnosed with HIV nine years ago, ticked off some of the things he thinks can lead people like him to risky behavior that could spread the virus: depression, loneliness, drug abuse. "Thank you. Thank you for sharing that," a counselor said cheerily.
OPINION
June 26, 2002 | DAVID SATCHER, David Satcher, the U.S. surgeon general from 1998 to 2002, is a former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
After several years of steady decline in new AIDS cases and deaths and a recent stabilization of new HIV infections, our nation is beginning to see troubling regressions in some populations, particularly among gay and bisexual men and African Americans and Latinos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gay Latino men living in poverty and subjected to racism and homophobia are more likely to engage in high-risk sexual behavior and have higher rates of HIV, according to a survey of men in Los Angeles, Miami and New York released Thursday. The National Gay and Lesbian Task Force study found that 73% of gay Latino men who engaged in high-risk behavior had been targets of racial and anti-homosexual slurs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1998
Young gay males are more likely to engage in high-risk sexual behaviors if they have low self-esteem or live in areas with a high amount of homophobia, according to new research from behavioral scientist Craig Waldo of UC San Francisco. Waldo and his colleagues studied 302 young gay men living in Eugene, Ore., Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz, all communities with few gay community resources. The team used questionnaires to assess the subjects' self-image and sexual behaviors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1993 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversy has erupted over a state proposal to screen people seeking free, anonymous testing for the virus that causes AIDS, a move opposed by the South Bay's major provider of such testing. The proposed screening--generally conducted by telephone when a person tries to schedule a test--would give preference to clients who have engaged in so-called high-risk behavior, such as injecting drugs or gay male sex.
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Although dramatic changes in sexual behavior have occurred among homosexual men in certain cities with a high incidence of AIDS, high-risk behavior persists in some major cities and in areas with a low rate of the disease, according to a new unpublished report. The report, a draft of which was obtained by The Times, concluded that high-risk behavior among gay men is least common in San Francisco, the likely result of "community organization and intervention."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gay Latino men living in poverty and subjected to racism and homophobia are more likely to engage in high-risk sexual behavior and have higher rates of HIV, according to a survey of men in Los Angeles, Miami and New York released Thursday. The National Gay and Lesbian Task Force study found that 73% of gay Latino men who engaged in high-risk behavior had been targets of racial and anti-homosexual slurs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1993 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversy has erupted over a state proposal to screen people seeking free, anonymous testing for the virus that causes AIDS, a move opposed by the South Bay's major provider of such testing. The proposed screening--generally conducted by telephone when a person tries to schedule a test--would give preference to clients who have engaged in so-called high-risk behavior, such as injecting drugs or gay male sex.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
A committee of California health officials is quietly drafting guidelines for counties that may want to isolate "recalcitrant" AIDS patients who seem intent on continuing to engage in high-risk behaviors that may infect others with the AIDS virus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1985 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Owners of gay bathhouses would be required to monitor activity in their establishments and throw out anyone engaging in "high-risk" sexual behavior that could lead to AIDS under guidelines proposed Tuesday by the county's chief health officer. The self-policing guidelines also would require that all areas within about 16 bathhouses operating in Los Angeles County be illuminated and that owners maintain a daily log of high-risk violations.
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