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Risk Factors

NEWS
January 25, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
They're called “risk factors” for a reason - people with high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol and/or a smoking habit are much more likely to have heart attacks, strokes and other manifestations of cardiovascular disease, including death. A new study coming out in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine analyzed health data on more than 250,000 adults to confirm that those who had any of these risk factors were in greater peril than those who didn't.
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NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By Melissa Healy/For the Booster Shots blog
Autism seems to have a powerful genetic component, but a family history of the disorder isn't the whole story. The circumstances of a baby's birth may also predispose a child to developing autism, says a new study. Babies who come into the world after a difficult delivery, who have to be coaxed or sometimes pulled out of the birth canal, who have gotten tangled in the umbilical cord or whose first days are characterized by feeding problems, anemia or jaundice, these children face higher odds of developing autism than those whose births were more uneventful, says the study , published Monday in Pediatrics.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | From United Press International
A survey of more than 3,000 surgeons shows that none appear to have been infected with the deadly AIDS virus from a patient, federal health officials reported Thursday. Dr. Augusto Sarmiento, president of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, called the results encouraging for both physicians and the public.
NEWS
July 20, 2010
Health screenings — they might be tedious, expensive, and time-consuming, but they also can be worth it, even if you're a healthy young adult. Take the case of cholesterol screening. Even though today approximately two-thirds of young adults have one or more risk factors for coronary heart disease, less than 50% of them are screened for high cholesterol, according to a study published in the July-August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine . Coronary heart disease, also known as coronary artery disease, is a buildup of calcium, plaque and fatty material in the arteries that restricts the flow of blood and oxygen to the heart and can lead to a heart attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
Should you take a statin? It depends on whether you already have heart disease, how high your cholesterol is and whether you have other medical problems that put you at risk. Many people already know their total cholesterol. But to make a decision about statins, it's also necessary to measure the levels of the two major types of cholesterol, LDL and HDL. (LDL is the artery-clogging variety that causes heart trouble; HDL helps prevent it.
BOOKS
January 7, 1990
The article ("Heart Disease in the Executive Suite," Dec. 10) was informative, but there was only one brief reference to one of the most significant causes of heart attacks--cigarette smoking. The statement by the specialist in cardiac rehabilitation that "the business person takes control and by choice joins a cardiac rehabilitation program" is not entirely true. The business person usually has health insurance, which pays for this program. Of the $2.5 billion spent on coronary bypass surgery each year in the United States, 99% of these patients have health insurance.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Visibly aging but young at heart?  Don't count on it, suggested researchers Tuesday.  In a study following more than 10,000 people over 35 years, the presence of visible signs of aging signaled an increased risk of heart attack and heart disease. The research was presented at the American Heart Assn.'s Scientific Sessions in Los Angeles and was conducted in Denmark by University of Copenhagen biochemist Dr. Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen and colleagues. The team analyzed data collected from participants in a large study of heart disease, noting whether subjects developed heart disease and also whether they had any of six signs of aging: baldness at the crown of the head, receding hairline at the temples, gray hair, wrinkles, earlobe crease and fatty deposits around the eyelids.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Black men and women are twice as likely to die from coronary heart disease as white men and women, according to a study led by University of Alabama doctors. Death rates from heart attacks and coronary heart disease have fallen since the 1970s, but that statement rings far truer for whites than for blacks. Studies have shown a widening gap between whites and blacks in heart disease deaths and in heart-attack hospitalizations, and new research pins down just how deadly that difference is. A paper published in this week's Journal of the American Medical Assn.
HEALTH
January 31, 2005 | From Reuters
People who have high blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes or who smoke in midlife have a much higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease later on, U.S. researchers have found. And the more factors a person has, the higher the risk. People with all four risk factors have more than double the risk of Alzheimer's, reported a team at Kaiser Permanente's division of research in Oakland. "The message is that the risk factors that are bad for the heart are bad for the brain," said Dr.
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