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Risk Factors

SCIENCE
November 18, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
CT scans of Egyptian mummies, some as much as 3,500 years old, show evidence of atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, which is normally thought of as a disease caused by modern lifestyles, researchers said Tuesday. The study, presented at the American Heart Assn. meeting in Orlando, Fla., was conceived by Dr. Gregory Thomas, a cardiologist at UC Irvine, after he read about Pharoah Merenptah at the Egyptian National Museum of Antiquities in Cairo. When he died at age 60 in 1203 BC, Merenptah was plagued by atherosclerosis, arthritis and dental decay.
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HEALTH
December 28, 2009 | By Jeannine Stein
Poverty appears to trump smoking, obesity and education as a health burden, potentially causing a loss of 8.2 years of perfect health. In a new study, researchers looked at health and life expectancy data from the National Health Interview Surveys and the Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys and came up with various behavioral and social risk factors that affect quality of life, then used a formula to estimate the quality-adjusted years of life that...
NEWS
July 20, 2010
Health screenings — they might be tedious, expensive, and time-consuming, but they also can be worth it, even if you're a healthy young adult. Take the case of cholesterol screening. Even though today approximately two-thirds of young adults have one or more risk factors for coronary heart disease, less than 50% of them are screened for high cholesterol, according to a study published in the July-August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine . Coronary heart disease, also known as coronary artery disease, is a buildup of calcium, plaque and fatty material in the arteries that restricts the flow of blood and oxygen to the heart and can lead to a heart attack.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By Melissa Healy/For the Booster Shots blog
Autism seems to have a powerful genetic component, but a family history of the disorder isn't the whole story. The circumstances of a baby's birth may also predispose a child to developing autism, says a new study. Babies who come into the world after a difficult delivery, who have to be coaxed or sometimes pulled out of the birth canal, who have gotten tangled in the umbilical cord or whose first days are characterized by feeding problems, anemia or jaundice, these children face higher odds of developing autism than those whose births were more uneventful, says the study , published Monday in Pediatrics.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2010 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
David Axene was flat on his back in a hospital bed with a swollen left leg. His kidneys had shut down. His blood pressure had plunged. Doctors pumped him with potent antibiotics to stave off a deadly infection. Yet there he was sifting through spreadsheets on his laptop, cradling his cellphone to his ear, waving off doctors to finish another conference call. California's top insurance watchdogs had hired Axene to scour Anthem Blue Cross' files for any flaw in the voluminous paperwork that accompanied its rate hikes of up to 39%. Anthem's plan to impose higher premiums March 1 had outraged consumers and politicians alike.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | From United Press International
A survey of more than 3,000 surgeons shows that none appear to have been infected with the deadly AIDS virus from a patient, federal health officials reported Thursday. Dr. Augusto Sarmiento, president of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, called the results encouraging for both physicians and the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
Should you take a statin? It depends on whether you already have heart disease, how high your cholesterol is and whether you have other medical problems that put you at risk. Many people already know their total cholesterol. But to make a decision about statins, it's also necessary to measure the levels of the two major types of cholesterol, LDL and HDL. (LDL is the artery-clogging variety that causes heart trouble; HDL helps prevent it.
BOOKS
January 7, 1990
The article ("Heart Disease in the Executive Suite," Dec. 10) was informative, but there was only one brief reference to one of the most significant causes of heart attacks--cigarette smoking. The statement by the specialist in cardiac rehabilitation that "the business person takes control and by choice joins a cardiac rehabilitation program" is not entirely true. The business person usually has health insurance, which pays for this program. Of the $2.5 billion spent on coronary bypass surgery each year in the United States, 99% of these patients have health insurance.
HEALTH
January 31, 2005 | From Reuters
People who have high blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes or who smoke in midlife have a much higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease later on, U.S. researchers have found. And the more factors a person has, the higher the risk. People with all four risk factors have more than double the risk of Alzheimer's, reported a team at Kaiser Permanente's division of research in Oakland. "The message is that the risk factors that are bad for the heart are bad for the brain," said Dr.
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