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Risk Factors

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
Should you take a statin? It depends on whether you already have heart disease, how high your cholesterol is and whether you have other medical problems that put you at risk. Many people already know their total cholesterol. But to make a decision about statins, it's also necessary to measure the levels of the two major types of cholesterol, LDL and HDL. (LDL is the artery-clogging variety that causes heart trouble; HDL helps prevent it.
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BOOKS
January 7, 1990
The article ("Heart Disease in the Executive Suite," Dec. 10) was informative, but there was only one brief reference to one of the most significant causes of heart attacks--cigarette smoking. The statement by the specialist in cardiac rehabilitation that "the business person takes control and by choice joins a cardiac rehabilitation program" is not entirely true. The business person usually has health insurance, which pays for this program. Of the $2.5 billion spent on coronary bypass surgery each year in the United States, 99% of these patients have health insurance.
NEWS
January 19, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Statin drugs are used by millions of Americans to lower cholesterol, but should they be so widespread? A new study suggests maybe not. British researchers say there's little evidence that statin drugs prevent heart disease in people who are at low risk for the disease. The study involved a review of data on 34,272 patients at low risk for heart attack and stroke between 1994 and 2006. It was conducted by the Cochrane Collaboration, an international organization that reviews medical research.
HEALTH
January 31, 2005 | From Reuters
People who have high blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes or who smoke in midlife have a much higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease later on, U.S. researchers have found. And the more factors a person has, the higher the risk. People with all four risk factors have more than double the risk of Alzheimer's, reported a team at Kaiser Permanente's division of research in Oakland. "The message is that the risk factors that are bad for the heart are bad for the brain," said Dr.
HEALTH
May 28, 2001 | SALLY SQUIRES, WASHINGTON POST
Question: So there's a bunch of new cholesterol guidelines. Why should I care this time? Answer: The guidelines, issued recently by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, are more aggressive than earlier ones. The government wants to treat more people, and treat them sooner to prevent heart disease and its related deaths (and costs). So if you didn't qualify for cholesterol-lowering treatment under the old recommendations, you may qualify now.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Black men and women are twice as likely to die from coronary heart disease as white men and women, according to a study led by University of Alabama doctors. Death rates from heart attacks and coronary heart disease have fallen since the 1970s, but that statement rings far truer for whites than for blacks. Studies have shown a widening gap between whites and blacks in heart disease deaths and in heart-attack hospitalizations, and new research pins down just how deadly that difference is. A paper published in this week's Journal of the American Medical Assn.
HEALTH
October 7, 2002 | DIANNE PARTIE LANGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The easiest way to assess your heart disease risk may be to measure your waist. A study of more than 9,000 white men and women found that the thickness of a person's midsection is more closely associated with other risk factors, such as cholesterol and glucose levels and blood pressure, than body mass index, or BMI. BMI, which is based on height and weight, has been used since the 1980s to estimate the risk of obesity-related diseases.
NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Heart disease, heart health, cardiovascular risk factors ... the terms will appear in infinite variety this month, as will the color red. If you don't know why (Valentine's Day is only part of the reason), you haven't been paying attention: February is American Heart Month and the American Heart Assn. has ramped up its Go Red for Women campaign. If you have been paying attention, good -- we can move on to more specific information. The point of the dual observances, of course, is to underscore the fact that cardiovascular disease claims about 2,200 lives a day in the United States.
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