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Risk Factors

SCIENCE
November 18, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
CT scans of Egyptian mummies, some as much as 3,500 years old, show evidence of atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, which is normally thought of as a disease caused by modern lifestyles, researchers said Tuesday. The study, presented at the American Heart Assn. meeting in Orlando, Fla., was conceived by Dr. Gregory Thomas, a cardiologist at UC Irvine, after he read about Pharoah Merenptah at the Egyptian National Museum of Antiquities in Cairo. When he died at age 60 in 1203 BC, Merenptah was plagued by atherosclerosis, arthritis and dental decay.
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BUSINESS
July 15, 2010 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
David Axene was flat on his back in a hospital bed with a swollen left leg. His kidneys had shut down. His blood pressure had plunged. Doctors pumped him with potent antibiotics to stave off a deadly infection. Yet there he was sifting through spreadsheets on his laptop, cradling his cellphone to his ear, waving off doctors to finish another conference call. California's top insurance watchdogs had hired Axene to scour Anthem Blue Cross' files for any flaw in the voluminous paperwork that accompanied its rate hikes of up to 39%. Anthem's plan to impose higher premiums March 1 had outraged consumers and politicians alike.
NEWS
August 30, 2010
African Americans who receive drug-coated stents have triple the risk of having a blood clot compared with other racial groups, researchers reported Monday. Stents are used to open blocked coronary arteries. Drug-coated stents release medication that can prevent the artery from becoming blocked again. Blood clots are a known risk of the procedure, although the probability of a clot is relatively low. However, a study of more than 7,000 patients found the rate of a life-threatening blood clot is much higher in blacks.
NEWS
February 15, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Awareness of women's heart health has improved over the last 30 years, but cardiovascular disease still causes a woman to die every minute, reports an article in the journal Circulation   detailing the American Heart Assn.'s new cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines for women.   Many of the guidelines, which were released on Tuesday, are familiar.  To minimize risk, women should avoid smoking; should exercise regularly; should eat a diet packed with fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fish; should keep to a healthy body weight and should treat their heart disease once they know they have it. Doctors are also urged to screen patients for depression, because people who are receiving treatment for depression are more likely to follow medical advice than those who aren't.
NEWS
February 14, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Flowers and Lakers tickets are nice Valentine's Day gifts. But a guide to taking care of your flesh-and-blood heart is a great idea too. Take a look at " Heart 411 : The Only Guide to Heart Health You'll Ever Need. " This new book is authored by two of the top guns in cardiology: Dr. Marc Gillinov and Dr. Steven Nissen of the Cleveland Clinic. The two doctors are on the cutting edge of heart health and have been outspoken about protecting consumers from harmful or unnecessary therapies.
HEALTH
April 5, 2010 | Los Angeles Times Health staff
Cancer, diabetes, accidents — heart disease trumps them all, killing more people in the United States than any other condition. The term is actually a fairly broad one, encompassing an array of conditions, but it's most often used as shorthand for coronary artery disease. The latter is caused by a buildup of plaque in the arteries that supply blood to the heart, which in turn can lead to chest pain, arrythmias, heart attacks and heart failure. The risk factors: High blood cholesterol High blood pressure Smoking Diabetes, insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome Being overweight Growing older Family history of heart disease What you can do: Get that high blood pressure and high cholesterol under control.
SCIENCE
February 6, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Long before a woman hits middle age, she and her doctor should be thinking about her risk of stroke and taking steps to reduce it, according to the first set of stroke guidelines aimed at women. The overall stroke risk for women is higher than it is for men, in part because women live longer. But the new guidelines from the American Heart Assn. underscore that many other factors may increase their risk as well, and many of them are evident when a woman is in her 20s and 30s. Some, like complications of pregnancy and menopause, are unique to women.
NEWS
April 4, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
If you find yourself spending extra hours at work, take note: They may take a physical toll. A study released today in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine found that those who put in more than 11 hours a day at their jobs had a greater relative risk of coronary heart disease than those who worked fewer hours. Researchers looked at data on 7,095 male and female full-time British civil servants ages 39 to 62 who had no evidence of coronary heart disease at the beginning of the study.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2007 | James Gerstenzang and Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writers
Vice President Dick Cheney is being treated for a blood clot in his left leg, his office announced Monday -- a condition that, if left untreated, can be deadly if the clot breaks loose and reaches the heart, brain or lungs. The vice president, who has had four heart attacks and experienced other cardiovascular problems over the last three decades, is being treated with blood-thinning medication, said his deputy press secretary, Megan McGinn.
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