Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRisk Factors
IN THE NEWS

Risk Factors

NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Heart disease, heart health, cardiovascular risk factors ... the terms will appear in infinite variety this month, as will the color red. If you don't know why (Valentine's Day is only part of the reason), you haven't been paying attention: February is American Heart Month and the American Heart Assn. has ramped up its Go Red for Women campaign. If you have been paying attention, good -- we can move on to more specific information. The point of the dual observances, of course, is to underscore the fact that cardiovascular disease claims about 2,200 lives a day in the United States.
Advertisement
HEALTH
August 9, 2010 | By Jessie Schiewe, Los Angeles Times
Signs of heart disease -- generally thought to be a disease of middle age -- can be seen even in children, cardiologists now know. But risk factors in children and young adults run the risk of being undetected and untreated, largely because of confusion as to who among the young should get screened, and when. One of the most efficient ways to screen for heart-disease risk is via tests for levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol. And yet often that screen doesn't get done.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By Melissa Healy/For the Booster Shots blog
Autism seems to have a powerful genetic component, but a family history of the disorder isn't the whole story. The circumstances of a baby's birth may also predispose a child to developing autism, says a new study. Babies who come into the world after a difficult delivery, who have to be coaxed or sometimes pulled out of the birth canal, who have gotten tangled in the umbilical cord or whose first days are characterized by feeding problems, anemia or jaundice, these children face higher odds of developing autism than those whose births were more uneventful, says the study , published Monday in Pediatrics.
NEWS
October 27, 2009 | By Shari Roan
Middle-aged men still have higher rates of heart attacks and heart disease than middle-aged women, but those gender differences appear to be narrowing, according to a study published Monday. The findings follow earlier research, published in a 2007 issue of the journal Neurology, establishing that stroke prevalence among women ages 45 to 54 was double that of men of the same age. Together, the findings suggest "an ominous trend in cardiovascular health among midlife women," said the lead author of both studies, Dr. Amytis Towfighi, an assistant professor of neurology at the University of Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2010 | By Garret Therolf
Responding to recent deaths among children who passed through Los Angeles County's child welfare system, Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas renewed his call Monday to improve the computer system designed to provide county agencies with information about a child's risk factors for abuse. The Times reported Sunday that an upgraded system for sharing information among agencies about suspicious injuries, domestic violence and other key risk factors was one of a number of unfinished reform efforts.
SCIENCE
November 18, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
CT scans of Egyptian mummies, some as much as 3,500 years old, show evidence of atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, which is normally thought of as a disease caused by modern lifestyles, researchers said Tuesday. The study, presented at the American Heart Assn. meeting in Orlando, Fla., was conceived by Dr. Gregory Thomas, a cardiologist at UC Irvine, after he read about Pharoah Merenptah at the Egyptian National Museum of Antiquities in Cairo. When he died at age 60 in 1203 BC, Merenptah was plagued by atherosclerosis, arthritis and dental decay.
NEWS
August 30, 2010
African Americans who receive drug-coated stents have triple the risk of having a blood clot compared with other racial groups, researchers reported Monday. Stents are used to open blocked coronary arteries. Drug-coated stents release medication that can prevent the artery from becoming blocked again. Blood clots are a known risk of the procedure, although the probability of a clot is relatively low. However, a study of more than 7,000 patients found the rate of a life-threatening blood clot is much higher in blacks.
HEALTH
April 5, 2010 | Los Angeles Times Health staff
Cancer, diabetes, accidents — heart disease trumps them all, killing more people in the United States than any other condition. The term is actually a fairly broad one, encompassing an array of conditions, but it's most often used as shorthand for coronary artery disease. The latter is caused by a buildup of plaque in the arteries that supply blood to the heart, which in turn can lead to chest pain, arrythmias, heart attacks and heart failure. The risk factors: High blood cholesterol High blood pressure Smoking Diabetes, insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome Being overweight Growing older Family history of heart disease What you can do: Get that high blood pressure and high cholesterol under control.
NEWS
February 15, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Awareness of women's heart health has improved over the last 30 years, but cardiovascular disease still causes a woman to die every minute, reports an article in the journal Circulation   detailing the American Heart Assn.'s new cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines for women.   Many of the guidelines, which were released on Tuesday, are familiar.  To minimize risk, women should avoid smoking; should exercise regularly; should eat a diet packed with fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fish; should keep to a healthy body weight and should treat their heart disease once they know they have it. Doctors are also urged to screen patients for depression, because people who are receiving treatment for depression are more likely to follow medical advice than those who aren't.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|