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NEWS
June 11, 1994 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
After a 2 1/2-year study involving hundreds of people around the state, California has come up with a new and controversial method of evaluating environmental risk that downplays the traditional role of science and takes into account people's values, opinions, fears and anxieties. Intended to guide decision-making by the state's Environmental Protection Agency, the new approach to risk assessment already is provoking an outcry in the business community.
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BUSINESS
October 7, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
With interest rates at near-record lows, these have not been good times for investors looking to generate low-risk income. Money-market accounts are paying an average of 0.5%. (Think about that: A $1-million deposit into an average money-market will yield a whopping $5,000 a year.) Even five-year CDs are yielding just 1.5% on average. So, where's an income-hungry investor to turn? One option is high-yield bonds, which are paying about 6% but carry risk that issuing companies may default, eroding the bonds' value.
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NEWS
June 21, 1990
Pasadena spends more for risk management than other cities of comparable size, according to an audit prepared by Newport Beach consultants Warren, McVeigh & Griffin Inc. The report, presented at Tuesday's Board of Directors meeting, attributed the higher costs to the diverse services offered by the city, including its own police helicopter fleet, electric power company and independent health clinics. According to the report, Pasadena pays $4.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- A key financial regulator said the investigation of the more than $2-billion trading loss at JPMorgan Chase & Co. has found the bank apparently has "serious risk management issues" that might go beyond the office responsible for the losses. "We do believe as a preliminary matter that there are apparent serious risk management weaknesses at the bank," Comptroller of the Currency Thomas J. Curry told the House Financial Services Committee on Tuesday. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency is the main regulator for JPMorgan Chase's banking operations and is "continuing to examine the root causes for those failures and whether there are other weaknesses" outside the firm's chief investment office, which conducted the trades that led to the losses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
Maneuvering a nonprofit group through the maze of insurance issues is a dicey proposition. Although volunteers give their time out of benevolence, accidents do happen. Sometimes people have car accidents while volunteering. And on occasion, a board member might embezzle money from a charitable group or a volunteer might abuse a nonprofit organization's clients.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- A key financial regulator said the investigation of the more than $2-billion trading loss at JPMorgan Chase & Co. has found the bank apparently has "serious risk management issues" that might go beyond the office responsible for the losses. "We do believe as a preliminary matter that there are apparent serious risk management weaknesses at the bank," Comptroller of the Currency Thomas J. Curry told the House Financial Services Committee on Tuesday. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency is the main regulator for JPMorgan Chase's banking operations and is "continuing to examine the root causes for those failures and whether there are other weaknesses" outside the firm's chief investment office, which conducted the trades that led to the losses.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1996 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Financial planners tell stories about people who hesitate to invest in the stock market because they fear risk. There are widows who fear that a stock crash could leave them destitute. There are young couples who pine for a new home but worry that an investment loss could kill their chances. And there are people who remember parents who were devastated by the 1929 market crash and simply don't want it to happen to them.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2000 | JUAN HOVEY
Get ready to pay more for your business insurance and maybe to find a new insurer, whether you want to or not. For that matter, get ready to make nice with your insurance broker, as you may need help getting through the months ahead. Why? Because for the first time in more than a decade, insurance premiums are going up. If you own a small or mid-size business, this means you may pay higher premiums for your business insurance in the coming months.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | ANTOINETTE MARTIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When I was little, my sibs and I had hide-outs where we often spent whole days without glimpsing an adult, which was, come to think of it, the point. * Our favorite place was a pond near an abandoned house in the big apricot orchard at the end of our street. It was private, mysterious--and slightly dangerous. Perfect. Would I let my kids play in there? No way. When my husband was 10, he used to ride the bus through East St. Louis with another boy so they could go to Cardinals games. Alone!
BUSINESS
February 17, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac
Physicians who want to prescribe Amgen Inc.'s anti-anemia drugs for cancer patients will have to register and undergo special training under a risk-management plan unveiled Tuesday by the Food and Drug Administration. Amgen also will require physicians to collect signed statements from patients attesting that they have been informed about the dangers of the drugs. Studies have shown that the drugs can cause tumors to grow faster and shorten the lives of some cancer patients. They may also increase risk of heart failure, blood clots and stroke.
HEALTH
November 11, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
As Americans — including even young children — continue to get fatter, their risk for heart disease is climbing too. So a panel of experts now is recommending that all kids have their cholesterol checked at least once between ages 9 and 11 and again between 17 and 21. Although children typically don't have heart attacks and strokes, evidence has been mounting for years that the roots of those diseases begin early in life, and the rising rates...
BUSINESS
October 8, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Top administrators and investment managers at the California Public Employees' Retirement System were awarded $4.5 million in bonuses, averaging 41% of their base salaries for the year that ended June 30. The bonuses ranged from a high of 73% of the $240,000 salary of the senior portfolio manager for fixed income to a low of 14% of the $358,280 salary for the senior investment officer in charge of risk management. The fixed income securities manager, Tom McDonagh, also got the largest bonus measured in total dollars, $212,064, which was pro-rated to cover 14.5 months in the position.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee and Richard Fausset, Tribune Washington Bureau and Los Angeles Times
BP and the two other companies drilling the exploratory Macondo oil well in the Gulf of Mexico all violated federal safety regulations leading up to last year's oil spill, a federal investigation concluded in findings that could be crucial for a Justice Department investigation and numerous lawsuits surrounding the disaster. The report pinned much of the blame on oil giant BP, which was "ultimately responsible" for operations and safety on the rig. But the joint inquiry by the Coast Guard and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement was critical of BP's drilling contractors,Transocean and Halliburton.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2010 | By Neela Banerjee, Tribune Washington Bureau
Failure to manage the risks of a complex well and to learn from an earlier narrowly missed disaster contributed significantly to the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, a panel investigating the BP oil spill said Wednesday. "Numerous decisions" to continue operations despite repeated warnings of problems "suggest an insufficient consideration of risk and a lack of operating discipline," according to a report issued by a committee at the National Academy of Engineering/National Research Council, which was convened at the request of Interior Secretary Ken Salazar.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac
Physicians who want to prescribe Amgen Inc.'s anti-anemia drugs for cancer patients will have to register and undergo special training under a risk-management plan unveiled Tuesday by the Food and Drug Administration. Amgen also will require physicians to collect signed statements from patients attesting that they have been informed about the dangers of the drugs. Studies have shown that the drugs can cause tumors to grow faster and shorten the lives of some cancer patients. They may also increase risk of heart failure, blood clots and stroke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles' approach to potential lawsuits is "reactionary and knee-jerk," often wasting taxpayer money in costly settlements and court judgments that could have been avoided, City Controller Laura Chick said Monday. Chick said the city paid $35 million in legal settlements in 2006, a figure she believes was driven up by a disorganized system in which each city department handles risk-management duties independently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1988
John L. Oskins Jr., Orange County's risk management manager and the man who decides whether taxpayers will foot the bill in hundreds of lawsuits filed against the county, will leave next month for a non-government job. Oskins, 44, will join Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services Inc. as vice president and will set up a new consulting service for public agencies that want to keep their legal expenses down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
The city's risk manager, who is credited with saving Fullerton "hundreds of thousands of dollars a year," has resigned to accept another job, officials said Tuesday. Paula Chu Tanguay served the city for six years. She is leaving to head the Alliance of Schools for Cooperative Insurance Programs, an insurance pool based in Downey. Her last day of work is May 14, she said.
SPORTS
May 18, 2007 | Lauren Peterson, Times Staff Writer
Nancy Ramirez can't help it. She cringes every time she watches her daughter, Mission Viejo Trabuco Hills senior Heather Ramirez, do an inward or backward dive off a one- or three-meter springboard. "From the perspective of where you're sitting, it looks really close, like they're going to hit the board," she said while watching the Southern Section Division I diving championships earlier this month.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2006 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
A former Enron Corp. risk manager testified Tuesday that he was pushed out of a key assignment at the energy trading company because he objected to what he believed were questionable financial maneuverings. Wincenty "Vince" Kaminski said Jeffrey K. Skilling, then Enron's president, called him in July 1999 to say that Kaminski and his team of analysts were being transferred.
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