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Risk Pool

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BUSINESS
April 22, 2007
"Insurer allowed to drop Realtors' health coverage" (April 17) is another example of how insurers benefit by dividing us all into little risk pools and then drowning us one by one. Are Realtors less healthy than other workers? Probably not. But if their risk pool is not as profitable, Blue Shield of California pulls the plug, and healthcare for the Realtors becomes someone else's problem. Feel secure about your coverage? How are things in your pool? DAVID GREENE San Pedro
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NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Jon Healey
Is Barack Obama the nation's first hipster president? Obama appeared Tuesday in an episode of "Between Two Ferns With Zach Galifianakis," a recurring comedy sketch on the Funny or Die website. Maybe it was just good prep work by his aides, but Obama's grasp of the "Two Ferns" conceit - the mutual antagonism between host and guest - suggested that he was actually familiar with the cringe-worthy series. The president was on "Two Ferns" ostensibly to promote the Affordable Care Act and urge people to sign up for a health plan at HealthCare.gov, the new federal insurance-buying site.
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BOOKS
November 13, 1988 | RICHARD EDER
The American archetype, the loner, the cowboy, the man who rides into town, gives it a clout or two and rides off into the sunset: His virtue, above all, is to ride off. He doesn't stick around. Around, he wouldn't be interesting. Around, he would be a pest.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
Spurning President Obama's plan for canceled policies, California's health insurance exchange voted against any extension for about 1 million policyholders in the state. The five-member board of the exchange voted unanimously to keep its current requirement that insurers terminate most individual policies Dec. 31 because they don't meet all the requirements of the Affordable Care Act. The decision ends a weeklong drama over what would happen for policyholders who will lose their existing coverage at year-end and face finding replacement insurance that may cost them substantially more in many instances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2008 | Jordan Rau, Rau is a Times staff writer.
Dave Dunlap is a Kern County trucker with a failing liver. Like about 600,000 Californians, he is too sick to qualify for private insurance on the open market. "I'm trying to fight to get a transplant," he said. "Everyone's waiting for me to have a way to pay for it. I can't even get on the donor list until I have a way to pay for it." California is supposed to have a solution for people like Dunlap.
OPINION
July 23, 2008
Re "State fines 2 health plans over canceled coverage," July 18 How does the state's fining Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield and other insurance companies on the order of about $6,000 per dropped policyholder not leave the insurers way ahead? They undoubtedly avoided paying many times greater sums in medical bills and now are obliged only to permit these undesirables to again soil their risk pool. When will we realize that the private insurance model is only tenable when the sick are denied access to it?
BUSINESS
March 27, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Today's the day the U.S. Supreme Court tackles the so-called insurance mandate in the healthcare reform law. So what's really at stake? Simply put, if the court rules that the requirement for most people to buy health insurance or face a tax penalty is unconstitutional, perhaps the most important element of the law becomes unworkable. Polls show that most Americans support the provision in the law requiring insurers to provide coverage to anyone, regardless of medical condition.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2012 | David Lazarus
It remains anyone's guess how the Supreme Court will vote this year on whether Congress can require people to buy insurance as part of President Obama's healthcare reform law. At this point, the smart money is on a 4-4 split between the court's conservative and progressive factions, with Justice Anthony M. Kennedy the likely swing vote. And he hasn't tipped his hand on how he feels about the issue. With this in mind, it's helpful to remember why this is even being discussed.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2011 | David Lazarus
Stuart and Cathy Selter of Agoura Hills were satisfied with their Anthem Blue Cross health insurance plan, which cost them about $1,500 a month in premiums and had a $2,500 deductible. Now, they say, Anthem is moving the goal posts for their coverage. The insurer informed them recently that because it's no longer selling their plan, the risk pool is shrinking and their premiums will rise. Anthem didn't specify how much the Selters' rates could increase. But if fewer people are sharing the risk of an insurance plan, costs could rise dramatically.
OPINION
March 23, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
First: Congratulations to President Obama and the Democratic leadership. You won dirty against bipartisan opposition from both Congress and the majority of Americans. You've definitely polarized the country even more, and quite possibly bankrupted us too. But hey, you won. Bubbly for everyone. Simply, you have nationalized healthcare by proxy. Insurance companies are now heavily regulated government contractors. Way to get big business out of Washington! They will clear a small, government-approved profit on top of their government-approved fees.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Jon Healey
The Times' Maeve Reston on Monday dove into the fight that supporters and opponents of the 2010 healthcare law are waging for the hearts and minds of young adults, a constituency crucial to the new state insurance exchanges created by the law. Unless plenty of younger and healthier people sign up for coverage at the exchanges, insurers selling policies there could get stuck with too many customers who run up large medical bills. That, in turn, could drive up premiums faster, leading fewer healthy people to carry coverage, and so on in a vicious spiral.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2012 | David Lazarus
This was the year of the healthcare mandate. No other consumer story of 2012 comes close. In a split decision, with Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. casting the deciding vote, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the cornerstone of President Obama's healthcare reform law, the most sweeping overhaul of our dysfunctional medical system in decades. The so-called individual mandate requires that most people have health insurance. It's the trade-off for the insurance industry's agreement to stop denying coverage to people with preexisting conditions and to stop charging higher rates if you get sick.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Today's the day the U.S. Supreme Court tackles the so-called insurance mandate in the healthcare reform law. So what's really at stake? Simply put, if the court rules that the requirement for most people to buy health insurance or face a tax penalty is unconstitutional, perhaps the most important element of the law becomes unworkable. Polls show that most Americans support the provision in the law requiring insurers to provide coverage to anyone, regardless of medical condition.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2012 | David Lazarus
It remains anyone's guess how the Supreme Court will vote this year on whether Congress can require people to buy insurance as part of President Obama's healthcare reform law. At this point, the smart money is on a 4-4 split between the court's conservative and progressive factions, with Justice Anthony M. Kennedy the likely swing vote. And he hasn't tipped his hand on how he feels about the issue. With this in mind, it's helpful to remember why this is even being discussed.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2011 | David Lazarus
Stuart and Cathy Selter of Agoura Hills were satisfied with their Anthem Blue Cross health insurance plan, which cost them about $1,500 a month in premiums and had a $2,500 deductible. Now, they say, Anthem is moving the goal posts for their coverage. The insurer informed them recently that because it's no longer selling their plan, the risk pool is shrinking and their premiums will rise. Anthem didn't specify how much the Selters' rates could increase. But if fewer people are sharing the risk of an insurance plan, costs could rise dramatically.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2010 | By Noam N. Levey, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Obama administration and some state governments will begin accepting applications Thursday for new insurance programs designed to cover people who have been denied insurance because they have preexisting medical conditions. These so-called high-risk pools were included in the new healthcare law to provide relief for some of the most desperate uninsured Americans until 2014, when insurance companies will be required to cover everyone regardless of medical history. Also taking effect Thursday will be the first of the new taxes in the healthcare law — on tanning salon services.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
Spurning President Obama's plan for canceled policies, California's health insurance exchange voted against any extension for about 1 million policyholders in the state. The five-member board of the exchange voted unanimously to keep its current requirement that insurers terminate most individual policies Dec. 31 because they don't meet all the requirements of the Affordable Care Act. The decision ends a weeklong drama over what would happen for policyholders who will lose their existing coverage at year-end and face finding replacement insurance that may cost them substantially more in many instances.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Jon Healey
Is Barack Obama the nation's first hipster president? Obama appeared Tuesday in an episode of "Between Two Ferns With Zach Galifianakis," a recurring comedy sketch on the Funny or Die website. Maybe it was just good prep work by his aides, but Obama's grasp of the "Two Ferns" conceit - the mutual antagonism between host and guest - suggested that he was actually familiar with the cringe-worthy series. The president was on "Two Ferns" ostensibly to promote the Affordable Care Act and urge people to sign up for a health plan at HealthCare.gov, the new federal insurance-buying site.
OPINION
March 23, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
First: Congratulations to President Obama and the Democratic leadership. You won dirty against bipartisan opposition from both Congress and the majority of Americans. You've definitely polarized the country even more, and quite possibly bankrupted us too. But hey, you won. Bubbly for everyone. Simply, you have nationalized healthcare by proxy. Insurance companies are now heavily regulated government contractors. Way to get big business out of Washington! They will clear a small, government-approved profit on top of their government-approved fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2008 | Jordan Rau, Rau is a Times staff writer.
Dave Dunlap is a Kern County trucker with a failing liver. Like about 600,000 Californians, he is too sick to qualify for private insurance on the open market. "I'm trying to fight to get a transplant," he said. "Everyone's waiting for me to have a way to pay for it. I can't even get on the donor list until I have a way to pay for it." California is supposed to have a solution for people like Dunlap.
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