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Risky Behavior

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NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
When teenagers engage in dangerous behavior, adults usually chalk it up to some innate fondness for risk - the thrill of an unsafe situation. But in fact, adolescents may be more risk-averse than adults, a new study has found.  Their willingness to engage in risky behavior may have less to do with thrill-seeking per se than with a higher tolerance for uncertain consequences, researchers reported Monday. “Teenagers enter unsafe situations not because they are drawn to dangerous or risky situations, but rather because they aren't informed enough about the odds of the consequences of their actions,” said Agnieszka Tymula, a postdoctoral researcher at New York University and coauthor of a report detailing the study, in a statement.
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SCIENCE
December 9, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Violence isn't the only problem with violent movies aimed at younger audiences - they also tend to glamorize risky activities you might not want to encourage among kids, according to a new study. “We know some teenagers imitate what they see on-screen,” study leader Amy Bleakley , a research scientist at the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg Public Policy Center, explained in a statement. “What concerns us is that movies aimed at younger viewers are making a connection between violence and a variety of risky behaviors - sex, drinking and smoking.” Let's start with the violence.
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NEWS
June 7, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
One of the women Rep. Anthony Weiner pursued over the Internet didn’t understand how the married New York congressman could take as many chances as he did by sending compromising photos of himself, ones that clearly identified who he was. At first, 26-year-old Meagan Broussard “didn’t think it was him. I thought, for sure, why would someone in that position be doing this?” According to an interview with ABC News, Broussard asked him for proof. Weiner quickly responded by sending her a photo of him holding a piece of paper with the word “me” written on it. Photos: A decade of D.C. sex scandals That was followed by more scandalous shots, one that featured Weiner’s bare torso, with photos of him clearly identifiable in the background, including ones with Weiner’s wife, Huma Abedin, an aide to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, and former President Clinton.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2013 | By Alan Eyerly
“A Red Wheelbarrow,” the latest installment of Showtime's “Homeland,” refers to a cryptic text message sent by case officer Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes) as she closes in on the CIA headquarters bomber. Was Carrie texting CIA Acting Director Saul Berenson (Mandy Patinkin), meaning they're working together on a secret op? Or is Saul working his own scheme and Carrie's out of the loop? So much intrigue in Episode 308 as the CIA turns up the heat on attorney Leland Bennett (Martin Donovan)
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Risky behavior among teenage boys--involving sex, drug use and violence--may be far more prevalent than youths admit in standard paper-and-pencil questionnaires, according to the first national survey to test a computer-assisted interviewing approach. The findings, reported today in the journal Science, present a "disturbing picture of the biological and social risks that confront young males in the United States at the end of the 20th century," the researchers wrote.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By Melissa Healy / Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Forget about rock 'n' roll: When rats are administered the highly addictive stimulant methamphetamine and allowed to engage in sexual behavior while high, all they want is more of both. That's the raw finding of a study published Tuesday by the Journal of Neuroscience. It's important because many who use methamphetamine report that it enhances their sexual experience. But because it also reduces their inhibitions , those abusers are more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior , including unprotected sex and anal intercourse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1988 | Times Medical Writer Janny Scott reported from Atlanta at the American Psychological Assn. annual meeting. and
Contact tracing--the practice of notifying the sexual contacts of people with AIDS--is playing a growing role in national AIDS-control efforts. But there is little proof that it does more than fulfill the political needs of public officials, several researchers reported. Edmund F.
OPINION
November 24, 2003
"Derailing Illusions That Kill" says that scientists say crossing accidents can be laid to quirks of human perception, and to such things as people having their sound systems turned up so that they can't hear outside sounds (the same thing that bedevils drivers of emergency vehicles). In spite of all the theories and explanations, this is still a simple issue of personal responsibility. I will never be hit by a train, because when I see one coming, I wait until it passes, especially if the gates are down; and if my sound system is so loud I can't hear sounds that may be important to my safety, I turn the thing down.
NEWS
June 7, 2000 | JACQUELINE NEWMYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of teenagers engaging in risky behavior--from taking drugs to fighting to having sex--declined steadily in the last decade, according to an Urban Institute study released Tuesday. The study by the nonpartisan Washington think tank found that adolescents are more likely to abstain from risky behavior now than they have been at any point in the last 10 years.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
That gay teens are more likely to consider suicide is a well-known and tragic fact . But now research indicates that gay and bisexual teens are also more likely to engage in a wide range of risky behavior -- such as using drugs, alcohol and tobacco; having unprotected sex; and trying to lose weight through diet pills or vomiting.  The news comes from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analysis released Monday of survey responses...
SCIENCE
August 19, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Bullying doesn't end in the school yard, but casts a shadow across adulthood, when victims are far more likely to have emotional, behavioral, financial and health problems, a new study suggests. Those who were both victim and perpetrator as schoolchildren fared the worst as adults: they were more than six times more likely to be diagnosed with a serious illness or psychiatric disorder, and to smoke regularly, according to the study published Monday in the journal Psychological Science.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
African American adults who were counseled to eat more produce and get more exercise as ways to reduce their chances of getting cancer and heart disease ate more fruit over the course of a month, researchers said. But they didn't exercise or up their consumption of vegetables, according to the work presented Wednesday at the American Assn. for Cancer Research meeting in Anaheim. The work was looking at the notion that a greater effect could be achieved if people understood that one risky behavior - a poor diet, for instance - is associated with the chance of developing multiple diseases, said Melanie Jefferson of the Medical University of South Carolina, the lead researcher.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
When teenagers engage in dangerous behavior, adults usually chalk it up to some innate fondness for risk - the thrill of an unsafe situation. But in fact, adolescents may be more risk-averse than adults, a new study has found.  Their willingness to engage in risky behavior may have less to do with thrill-seeking per se than with a higher tolerance for uncertain consequences, researchers reported Monday. “Teenagers enter unsafe situations not because they are drawn to dangerous or risky situations, but rather because they aren't informed enough about the odds of the consequences of their actions,” said Agnieszka Tymula, a postdoctoral researcher at New York University and coauthor of a report detailing the study, in a statement.
NEWS
July 3, 2012 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
It might not come as a surprise to any parent who has caught their teen-age child red-handed and red-faced while sending a sexually explicit text message, but a new study is suggesting that “sexting” is prevalent among adolescents.    A report published online Monday in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine suggests that the sending and receiving of sexual photos and messages via cellphone and computer, or sexting, is common among teens and may be linked to their sexual behaviors.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2012 | By David Lazarus
The banking industry has such a bad rep, its leaders now vie for the honor of being the country's "least-hated" banker. That's the takeaway from a New York Times story that says Goldman Sachs' Lloyd Blankfein may have snatched least-hated honors from JPMorgan's Jamie Dimon after the latter trudged to Capitol Hill this week to apologize for losing a pile of money. It's a nice angle on a dry story, but it also highlights the astonishingly low expectations we have for the money club -- the men and women who ostensibly serve as the spark plugs for America's economic engine.
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Kids who show aggression could have worse health as adults, a study finds. Lifestyle choices -- what you eat, how much you exercise -- may not be the only forecaster of health later in life. A study in the Canadian Medical Assn. Journal finds that behavior in childhood, such as aggression and social withdrawal, could predict more sickness in adulthood. The study, released Monday, followed 3,913 children from 1976 to 1978 when they were in grades one, four and seven, through 1992 to 2006.
HEALTH
June 18, 2007 | Chelsea Martinez, Times Staff Writer
SMOKING, drinking, eating junk food and getting no exercise: All are risk factors for heart disease, and too many folks do more than one of them. Now a new study is bucking conventional physician wisdom. It's found that tackling a bunch of bad habits at the same time is better than dealing with them one by one. The study, published in last week's edition of the Archives of Internal Medicine, included 230 patients who were smokers, had hypertension and lived sedentary lifestyles. One-third were asked to change all three habits simultaneously; another one-third, in a sequential fashion: Both received counseling over the phone to help keep them on track.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2012 | By David Lazarus
The banking industry has such a bad rep, its leaders now vie for the honor of being the country's "least-hated" banker. That's the takeaway from a New York Times story that says Goldman Sachs' Lloyd Blankfein may have snatched least-hated honors from JPMorgan's Jamie Dimon after the latter trudged to Capitol Hill this week to apologize for losing a pile of money. It's a nice angle on a dry story, but it also highlights the astonishingly low expectations we have for the money club -- the men and women who ostensibly serve as the spark plugs for America's economic engine.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By Melissa Healy / Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Forget about rock 'n' roll: When rats are administered the highly addictive stimulant methamphetamine and allowed to engage in sexual behavior while high, all they want is more of both. That's the raw finding of a study published Tuesday by the Journal of Neuroscience. It's important because many who use methamphetamine report that it enhances their sexual experience. But because it also reduces their inhibitions , those abusers are more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior , including unprotected sex and anal intercourse.
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A Spanish bullfighter was badly gored last week, the Associated Press reports, when the bull he was fighting rammed its left horn into his lower jaw, making his eyeball protrude. After being gored, 39-year-old bullfighter Juan Jose Padilla stood up, blood gushing from his face, and was helped from the arena. After a five-hour operation he may be left with facial paralysis and blindness in one eye. While Internet commenters are busy arguing the pros and cons of bullfighting (we'll let you guess which side 99% of the comments are on)
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