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Risperdal Drug

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BUSINESS
January 24, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson said it received a U.S. subpoena regarding its drug Risperdal, the most prescribed schizophrenia medicine in the U.S. The subpoena for the company's Janssen Pharmaceutica division came from investigators for the Office of Personnel Management, the New Brunswick, N.J.-based company said. The government agency oversees health benefits for federal employees.
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BUSINESS
January 24, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson said it received a U.S. subpoena regarding its drug Risperdal, the most prescribed schizophrenia medicine in the U.S. The subpoena for the company's Janssen Pharmaceutica division came from investigators for the Office of Personnel Management, the New Brunswick, N.J.-based company said. The government agency oversees health benefits for federal employees.
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BUSINESS
July 2, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson and partner Alkermes Inc. said U.S. regulators rejected their twice-a-month form of the Risperdal schizophrenia drug, sending Alkermes shares down 68%. Investors are concerned about more bad news from the Food and Drug Administration after a string of rejections or delays for medications. The FDA raised questions about research for Risperdal, Johnson & Johnson said. Shares of Alkermes fell $10.86 to $5.15 on Nasdaq. New Brunswick, N.J.-based Johnson & Johnson shares fell $1.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2000 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A drug that treats anemia helped energize Johnson & Johnson's second-quarter earnings, which climbed 14% from a year earlier and topped forecasts, the big health-products concern said Tuesday. Led by Procrit, which treats anemia in dialysis and cancer patients, J&J said its drug sales surged 14% in the quarter ended June 30, to $3.2 billion. That included a 24% increase in domestic sales and a 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2003 | H.G. Reza and Mike Anton, Times Staff Writers
The night before Joseph Parker cut a bloody swath through a quiet Irvine supermarket, killing two people and wounding three with a sword Sunday morning, he paced inside a Santa Ana house. He didn't sleep. At 7:30 a.m. Sunday, his landlady, annoyed by the numerous cigarette butts Parker had squashed on the garage floor, ordered him to sweep them up as she left for church. "OK," Parker told Ofelia Bernal. She noticed he was dressed in an overcoat and wearing a beret, puffing on a cigarette.
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