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Rita Colwell

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2001
Rita Colwell, director of the National Science Foundation, has spent her life studying the cholera bacterium and its relationship to the environment. She has presided over an unprecedented explosion in the biological sciences--including, most recently, the sequencing and first glimmerings of understanding of the human genome. Yet Colwell has set a new priority for the NSF, and it's not life sciences, but mathematics. Recently she spent an afternoon chatting with Times science writer K.C.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2001
Rita Colwell, director of the National Science Foundation, has spent her life studying the cholera bacterium and its relationship to the environment. She has presided over an unprecedented explosion in the biological sciences--including, most recently, the sequencing and first glimmerings of understanding of the human genome. Yet Colwell has set a new priority for the NSF, and it's not life sciences, but mathematics. Recently she spent an afternoon chatting with Times science writer K.C.
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NEWS
February 15, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Five weeks after being picked to be deputy director of the National Science Foundation, Rita R. Colwell, president of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, will instead be nominated to head the foundation, President Clinton said. The organization distributes science and engineering research grants. Clinton announced that he intends to bring the current foundation director, Neal F. Lane, to the White House to become the president's top advisor on science and technology.
SCIENCE
June 18, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
U.S. researchers have linked a second strain of cholera to the epidemic that decimated the Haitian population in 2010-11. Previous studies have suggested that the epidemic was caused by bacteria inadvertently introduced by Nepalese soldiers who came to assist in recovery from a massive earthquake. The new strain appears to be local in origin, but its role in the epidemic is not clear because this strain does not normally produce epidemics. Haiti suffered a devastating magnitude 7 earthquake on Jan. 12, 2010, followed by about 52 aftershocks with a magnitude of 4.5 or higher.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
As winter darkness falls across Antarctica and temperatures plunge to 90 degrees below zero, the National Science Foundation is racing to mobilize the rescue of an ailing doctor at the South Pole before it is too cold for anyone to safely land or take off from the world's most remote human outpost. NSF officials said Wednesday they were preparing to evacuate Dr. Ronald S. Shemenski, 59, the station physician, who recently passed a gallstone and suffered associated pancreatitis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2002 | MARJORIE HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The squeaky sound of platform sandals and sneakers reverberated across Cal State Fullerton's McCarthy Hall on Thursday morning as 23 high school girls frantically raced up and down stairs and escalators in search of math scavenger-hunt clues. With pad, pencil and calculator in hand, 15-year-old Priya Gandhi bolted across a hallway in search of the room that would contain the coveted envelope with the next math problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2000 | K.C. COLE
In physics, as in life, there is a big difference between waves and splashes. The Edsel made a splash; Elvis Presley made waves. So did Albert Einstein. So, as was more than evident at a recent 60th birthday celebration at Caltech, did one of Einstein's most accomplished successors: physicist Kip Thorne. Most famously, perhaps, Thorne made waves with his explorations into the physics of time travel.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2003 | Shweta Govindarajan, Times Staff Writer
Greater federal assistance is needed to bolster the country's shrinking native-born science and engineering workforce and to encourage more U.S. college students to pursue careers in these fields, the National Science Foundation said Wednesday. The percentage of college-educated scientists and engineers who are working in the U.S. but were born elsewhere jumped from 14% in 1990 to 22% in 2000, a foundation study of workforce trends reported.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2010 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
University professors in the gulf region responded with delight last month to BP's pledge to put up $500 million for academic research into the Gulf of Mexico's ecology over the next 10 years. With no significant federal grants on the horizon and an urgency to begin work, some of the academics had taken to using their own credit cards in hopes they would soon be reimbursed. But their excitement at the windfall turned to chagrin last week after the White House ordered BP to consult with Gulf Coast governors before awarding research grants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1989 | HEIDI ZIOLKOWSKI, Ziolkowski is a free-lance writer based in Long Beach
Fish that grow up to four times normal size, oysters that are tasty year-round and mutant bacteria that discourage barnacles from adhering to hulls. These and other organisms owe their existence to the manipulation of their genetic material. Research under way with aquatic life promises to revolutionize the aquaculture industry and greatly improve the fuel efficiency of ships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2002 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Stephen Jay Gould, an influential evolutionary biologist, prolific essayist and passionate New York Yankees fan, died Monday of cancer at his home in New York City. Unfailingly witty, frequently controversial and occasionally combative, Gould, 60, was one of the best-known scientists of his generation. For many, he became the public face of science--a quick sketch of heavy-lidded eyes and a knowing half-smile separated by a thick, brush mustache.
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