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Rita Dove

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July 4, 1999
How she sat there, the time right inside a place so wrong it was ready. That trim name with its dream of a bench to rest on. Her sensible coat. Doing nothing was the doing: the clean flame of her gaze carved by a camera flash. How she stood up when they bent down to retrieve her purse. That courtesy. From "On the Bus With Rosa Parks," by Rita Dove (W.W. Norton: 96 pp., $21)
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May 17, 2009 | Paula L. Woods, Woods is a writer and frequent contributor to The Times' book reviews. Her crime novels include "Strange Bedfellows" and "Inner City Blues."
There was once a time when celebration of black achievement in the humanities, arts and sciences was limited to Black History Month and recitations at black churches. But given the widely respected scholarship of the late John Hope Franklin, the accomplishments of Nobel laureate Toni Morrison and the political ascendancy of President Obama, among many others, black achievement has irrevocably moved beyond cameos in someone else's drama to leading roles.
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NEWS
February 6, 1994 | Associated Press
Poet Rita Dove will serve a second one-year term as the Library of Congress' poet laureate. Dove, an English professor at the University of Virginia, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1987 for her book "Thomas and Beulah."
BOOKS
August 27, 2000
I love the hour before takeoff, that stretch of no time, no home but the gray vinyl seats linked like unfolding paper dolls.
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August 22, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It's call-and-response, through the ages. The stories that endure on this Earth eventually assume the role of literary provocateur, prodding new generations of storytellers and playwrights to respond with their own brand of myth-making. Every so often, as with Suzan-Lori Parks' "Scarlet Letter"-inspired "In the Blood" (which someone in Los Angeles should do before the century gets any older), the response takes flight, in a style and language all its own.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2009 | Paula L. Woods, Woods is a writer and frequent contributor to The Times' book reviews. Her crime novels include "Strange Bedfellows" and "Inner City Blues."
There was once a time when celebration of black achievement in the humanities, arts and sciences was limited to Black History Month and recitations at black churches. But given the widely respected scholarship of the late John Hope Franklin, the accomplishments of Nobel laureate Toni Morrison and the political ascendancy of President Obama, among many others, black achievement has irrevocably moved beyond cameos in someone else's drama to leading roles.
BOOKS
November 22, 1992 | Kelly Cherry, Poet and fiction writer Cherry's most recent book is the nonfiction "The Exiled Heart," an inquiry into meaning
Accustomed as all of us in this country are--and as no doubt it is instructive for us to be--to the rhetoric of rage, some may find this first novel by the second African-American to win a Pulitzer prize for poetry almost shocking in its sweet optimism, its willingness to forgive. Here is narrative prose whose first impulse is to describe its world precisely, without preconception. Such writing is felt by the reader as a kind of caress.
BOOKS
September 17, 1989
Rita Dove Each evening I see my breasts slacker, black-tipped like the heavy plugs on hot water bottles; each day resembling more the spiked fruits dangling from natives in the National Geographic my father forbade us to read. Each morning I drop coffee onto my blouse and tear into one slice of German bread, thin layer of margarine, radishes, the years spreading across my dark behind, even more sumptuous after childbirth, the part of me I swore to relish always.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2000 | EMORY HOLMES II, Emory Holmes II is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Simon Levy and Ben Bradley have just pulled off an unlikely, if terrifying, theatrical coup. Outflanking much larger and far richer regional houses, the Fountain Theatre's producing director-dramaturge and its director of audience development have landed the California premiere of "The Darker Face of the Earth," an imaginatively conceived, if controversial, tragedy in verse by U.S. Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Rita Dove.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2003 | Renee Tawa
Poets nationwide are continuing to build on their momentum as a persistent antiwar force with the publication of an anthology this week, "Poets Against the War" (Nation Books). Contributors include some of the country's most respected poets: former U.S. poet laureate Rita Dove, Adrienne Rich and W.S. Merwin. The first printing of 40,000 is huge for a collection of poetry.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It's call-and-response, through the ages. The stories that endure on this Earth eventually assume the role of literary provocateur, prodding new generations of storytellers and playwrights to respond with their own brand of myth-making. Every so often, as with Suzan-Lori Parks' "Scarlet Letter"-inspired "In the Blood" (which someone in Los Angeles should do before the century gets any older), the response takes flight, in a style and language all its own.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2000 | EMORY HOLMES II, Emory Holmes II is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Simon Levy and Ben Bradley have just pulled off an unlikely, if terrifying, theatrical coup. Outflanking much larger and far richer regional houses, the Fountain Theatre's producing director-dramaturge and its director of audience development have landed the California premiere of "The Darker Face of the Earth," an imaginatively conceived, if controversial, tragedy in verse by U.S. Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Rita Dove.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | Associated Press
Poet Rita Dove will serve a second one-year term as the Library of Congress' poet laureate. Dove, an English professor at the University of Virginia, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1987 for her book "Thomas and Beulah."
BOOKS
November 22, 1992 | Kelly Cherry, Poet and fiction writer Cherry's most recent book is the nonfiction "The Exiled Heart," an inquiry into meaning
Accustomed as all of us in this country are--and as no doubt it is instructive for us to be--to the rhetoric of rage, some may find this first novel by the second African-American to win a Pulitzer prize for poetry almost shocking in its sweet optimism, its willingness to forgive. Here is narrative prose whose first impulse is to describe its world precisely, without preconception. Such writing is felt by the reader as a kind of caress.
BOOKS
September 17, 1989
Rita Dove Each evening I see my breasts slacker, black-tipped like the heavy plugs on hot water bottles; each day resembling more the spiked fruits dangling from natives in the National Geographic my father forbade us to read. Each morning I drop coffee onto my blouse and tear into one slice of German bread, thin layer of margarine, radishes, the years spreading across my dark behind, even more sumptuous after childbirth, the part of me I swore to relish always.
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