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Rita Esquivel

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1991 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal director of minority language affairs and the head of the state teachers union praised bilingual education Wednesday as a means of fostering better understanding of foreign culture and lashed out at English-only advocates. Rita Esquivel, director of the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs, stressed that bilingual educators must teach students about the differences in various cultures as well as a new language in order for California, which she called "the new Ellis Island," to prosper.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1991 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal director of minority language affairs and the head of the state teachers union praised bilingual education Wednesday as a means of fostering better understanding of foreign culture and lashed out at English-only advocates. Rita Esquivel, director of the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs, stressed that bilingual educators must teach students about the differences in various cultures as well as a new language in order for California, which she called "the new Ellis Island," to prosper.
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NEWS
August 26, 1989 | LORI SILVER, Times Staff Writer
The Education Department, reversing its opposition to expanded bilingual education, is quietly shifting federal policy in favor of programs that use native languages to teach students English as well as other subjects. "It's a very significant shift," said James Lyons, executive director of the National Assn. for Bilingual Education. The department's new posture contrasts sharply with the policies of former Education Secretary William J.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | LORI SILVER, Times Staff Writer
The Education Department, reversing its opposition to expanded bilingual education, is quietly shifting federal policy in favor of programs that use native languages to teach students English as well as other subjects. "It's a very significant shift," said James Lyons, executive director of the National Assn. for Bilingual Education. The department's new posture contrasts sharply with the policies of former Education Secretary William J.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
Apples have been dropped from school lunch menus in the Beverly Hills and the Culver City school districts as the concern over the chemical used to treat the fruit continues to grow. Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District officials said they decided to continue to serve apples and apple products after receiving assurances from vendors and state and federal officials that the fruit they serve is free of the cancer-causing chemicals, said Rita Esquivel, a spokeswoman for the district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1992 | AJOWA IFATEYO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beneath the U.S. and California flags, an Academic Excellence flag was raised Thursday at Isojiro Oka Elementary School to the cheers of more than 600 students, parents, teachers and city officials. The red flag for scholastic excellence was presented to the school and the Fountain Valley School District by the U.S. Department of Education earlier this year in honor of its bilingual education program, aimed at teaching students in a total of 46 languages.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | CHRISTOPHER KRUEGER, Times Staff Writer
Once it was the centerpiece of Garfield Elementary School, a big, bronze bell that summoned local children to class. Later, when the one-story building housed Olympic Continuation High School, the bell was sounded by seniors as a graduation ritual. But now, the bell tolls for no one. The sentimental former centerpiece, saved when the old school building was razed two years ago, has been accidentally destroyed, according to officials of the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
A well-publicized campaign encouraging students to transfer to the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District has prompted concern in the Los Angeles Unified School District that such transfers might lead to racial flight at some schools and harm the district's integration efforts. As a result, the Los Angeles district announced this week that it will take a closer look at all requests from students seeking to transfer out of the district.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Juan Villagomez, a well-loved family practice physician whose three-year struggle with stomach cancer touched people from his West Los Angeles community all the way to the Vatican, died Thursday. He was 41. Though he struggled at the end just to breathe, Villagomez was overjoyed to learn from his hospital bed last month that the pope had conferred on him one of the highest awards a layperson can receive, Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice, for his life service to humanity.
NEWS
May 26, 1988 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
About 25 students, parents and grandparents ignited a spark of activism in Santa Monica's Latino community by marching this week to protest cuts in bilingual education in the city's schools. The nine-block march Tuesday through quiet neighborhoods and past a wall of gang graffiti ended at the headquarters of the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District, where demonstrators occupied the lobby and confronted officials.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
Banking on the desire of many parents to be close to their children during the work day, the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District has launched a campaign to recruit 150 new students whose parents work in the district but live elsewhere. School officials began circulating posters and meeting with business leaders and parents of eligible students recently to extol the virtues of the district, including excellent child care, experienced teachers and solid academic programs, Supt.
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