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Rita Figueroa

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1995 | IAN JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most people would gladly accept a personal invitation from the President to receive an award in the White House Rose Garden. Not Rita Figueroa, who has never boarded an airplane. She says it frightens her too much. She told an East Los Angeles priest that she was honored, but that she wouldn't fly even with the Pope. When Atty. Gen. Janet Reno called to suggest that she instead take a train or bus, Figueroa politely declined. It's her humble nature.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 8, 2010 | By Jared S. Hopkins
Rita Figueroa went all six rounds of her last fight before the bell rang and she headed to the locker room. But the boxer had a dreadful headache, then nausea and vomiting. Figueroa, 40, couldn't sign for her paycheck. Paramedics put her on a stretcher and prepared to put her in an ambulance. Then, according to members of her corner team, University of Illinois at Chicago Pavilion employees said the ambulance couldn't leave. The next bout had started, and state law required an ambulance to stand by during matches.
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NATIONAL
March 8, 2010 | By Jared S. Hopkins
Rita Figueroa went all six rounds of her last fight before the bell rang and she headed to the locker room. But the boxer had a dreadful headache, then nausea and vomiting. Figueroa, 40, couldn't sign for her paycheck. Paramedics put her on a stretcher and prepared to put her in an ambulance. Then, according to members of her corner team, University of Illinois at Chicago Pavilion employees said the ambulance couldn't leave. The next bout had started, and state law required an ambulance to stand by during matches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1995 | IAN JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most people would gladly accept a personal invitation from the President to receive an award in the White House Rose Garden. Not Rita Figueroa, who has never boarded an airplane. She says it frightens her too much. She told an East Los Angeles priest that she was honored, but that she wouldn't fly even with the Pope. When Atty. Gen. Janet Reno called to suggest that she instead take a train or bus, Figueroa politely declined. It's her humble nature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1985 | DANELIA WILD, United Press International
Officials estimate there are 40,000 children in Los Angeles County who are members of a lost generation--children lost to their parents through the pull of youth gangs. With 425 gangs claiming those 40,000 children as members, the county has been split into turfs delineated by gunfire and simmering warfare. More than 200 people were killed by gang violence in 1984--40% of them innocent victims.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | IAN JAMES
Most people would gladly accept a personal invitation from the President to receive an award at the White House rose garden. Not Rita Figueroa, who has never boarded an airplane. She says it frightens her too much. She told an East Los Angeles priest that she was honored, but that she wouldn't fly even with the Pope. When Atty. Gen. Janet Reno called to suggest that she instead take a train or bus, Figueroa politely declined. It's her humble nature.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The messages that Juvenile Court official David Flores reads these days in the graffiti and gang slogans scrawled on East Los Angeles alleyways, homes and businesses are more disturbing than ever. "I see new gang names showing up on the walls, and placas (logos) indicating that old, formerly quiet gangs are joining forces with younger groups and becoming active again," said Flores, administrator of Los Angeles County Juvenile Court schools. "It's very depressing."
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East Los Angeles' Chicano street gangs, largely written off as a problem over the last decade, have regained muscle by courting and recruiting a generation of younger "stoners"--youths who formed gangs based more on a love of drugs and loud music than street violence. The trend, which coincides with an increase in gang murders and gang-related crimes on Los Angeles' Eastside, has raised concerns among gang experts who fear a renewed cycle of killings and retribution.
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