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NATIONAL
October 9, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Like most of those whose lives were upended by Hurricane Katrina, 52-year-old school bus driver Emanuel Wilson can thank the federal government for the fact that he has money to pay rent. He's also been given food stamps to make sure he can buy groceries. And if he had young children, the government would almost certainly be helping them get back to school. But what Wilson needs is chemotherapy, and that is something the government seems unable to help him with.
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NATIONAL
November 5, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A medical transport service overcharged the federal government nearly $2 million to evacuate sick or injured people during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, a government audit found. CareFlite, based in Texas, billed the Department of Health and Human Services $5.7 million for transporting 810 patients, according to an audit by the agency's inspector general. The audit said there were times CareFlite used its own aircraft when it could have looked for less expensive transportation.
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NATIONAL
November 15, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A grand jury in Dallas declined to indict a bus driver in connection with the deaths of 23 passengers killed in a fire that destroyed the vehicle as they fled Hurricane Rita in September. The sheriff's department had said Juan Robles Gutierrez, 37, did not inspect the bus periodically on the 16-hour trip from Houston and didn't help the nursing home patients when the fire broke out.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2007 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
The federal government will extend housing assistance payments to victims of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita for 18 more months, officials announced Thursday, but residents will be required to pay a portion of their rent for part of that period. Almost two years after the 2005 hurricanes, more than 100,000 Gulf Coast households remain dependent on government housing aid, according to figures from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2005 | Elizabeth Douglass and Peter Pae, Times Staff Writers
Energy prices moved higher in futures markets and at the gas pump Monday, as traders focused on new damage reports from refiners and oil producers, which were still assessing the fallout from Hurricane Rita. The across-the-board increases in New York energy markets caught some analysts by surprise because the hurricane's damage was less severe than feared and because futures prices had fallen during Sunday's post-Rita electronic trading.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2005 | Warren Vieth and Richard Simon, Times Staff Writers
President Bush on Monday urged Americans to drive less and embrace conservation more in the wake of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and he said he would work with Congress to enact incentives for energy production and refinery construction. The president also said that he was directing federal agencies to reduce energy consumption and that he would release oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve as needed to ease the shortages and price increases caused by the hurricanes.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2005 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
President Bush said Tuesday that each family displaced by Hurricane Rita would receive a $2,000 check from the federal government. Victims of Hurricane Katrina, which struck before Rita, were already eligible for the payment. "Last night, we made the decision that the people affected by Rita would be treated the same way," the president said in Lake Charles, La. Bush made the announcement during his seventh visit to the coastal regions of the Gulf states in the wake of the two hurricanes.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2005 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
Futures prices for oil, gasoline and heating oil fell Sunday in an extended trading session in New York after preliminary inspections showed less-than-expected damage to refineries in Hurricane Rita's path. Nonetheless, oil experts warned that Rita's winds packed enough punch to cripple a handful of refineries for a few weeks -- and that means retail gasoline prices could rise over the next month in some parts of the country before descending again.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2005 | From Reuters
Stocks are expected to rise early in the week as investors breathe a sigh of relief that damage from Hurricane Rita was not as bad as feared. But earnings warnings and weak economic indicators expected later in the week could blunt any rally. The storm dealt only a glancing blow to Houston, the center of the U.S. oil industry and the fourth-largest U.S. city.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The owner of a tour company whose bus exploded and killed 23 nursing home residents as they fled Hurricane Rita pleaded not guilty in McAllen to conspiracy and safety violations. Global Limo Inc. and its president, James H. Maples, 65, are accused in a three-count federal indictment of conspiring to falsify driver time records and failing to inspect buses to ensure their safety.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Louisiana's state-run insurer is nearing a mass settlement with homeowners that would be the first deal of its kind in the state since hurricanes Rita and Katrina led to thousands of lawsuits, an attorney for the homeowners said Monday. Citizens Property Insurance Corp.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Victims of a bus explosion that killed 23 nursing home patients fleeing Hurricane Rita have reached an $11-million settlement with the bus owner and a travel broker. The bus caught fire in traffic near Dallas in September after leaving Houston. Some passengers and the driver escaped, but the flames, fed by medical oxygen tanks that exploded, trapped many inside.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The owner of a tour company whose bus exploded and killed 23 nursing home residents as they fled Hurricane Rita pleaded not guilty in McAllen to conspiracy and safety violations. Global Limo Inc. and its president, James H. Maples, 65, are accused in a three-count federal indictment of conspiring to falsify driver time records and failing to inspect buses to ensure their safety.
NATIONAL
November 15, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A grand jury in Dallas declined to indict a bus driver in connection with the deaths of 23 passengers killed in a fire that destroyed the vehicle as they fled Hurricane Rita in September. The sheriff's department had said Juan Robles Gutierrez, 37, did not inspect the bus periodically on the 16-hour trip from Houston and didn't help the nursing home patients when the fire broke out.
NATIONAL
November 8, 2005 | From Associated Press
State lawmakers grappled Monday with a $1-billion hole in the state budget left by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and considered ways to strengthen building codes. It was the first full day of a special legislative session called by Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco to deal with the aftermath of the two hurricanes.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
The chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. was assigned by the Bush administration Tuesday to oversee the federal government's disaster recovery efforts on the Gulf Coast. Donald Powell, 64, a wealthy contributor to President Bush's presidential campaign, will be in charge of coordinating long-term plans to rebuild the states hit by hurricanes Katrina and Rita in late summer. The sluggish federal response to Katrina, the first and most damaging of the two, has been widely criticized.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Victims of a bus explosion that killed 23 nursing home patients fleeing Hurricane Rita have reached an $11-million settlement with the bus owner and a travel broker. The bus caught fire in traffic near Dallas in September after leaving Houston. Some passengers and the driver escaped, but the flames, fed by medical oxygen tanks that exploded, trapped many inside.
NATIONAL
November 8, 2005 | From Associated Press
State lawmakers grappled Monday with a $1-billion hole in the state budget left by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and considered ways to strengthen building codes. It was the first full day of a special legislative session called by Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco to deal with the aftermath of the two hurricanes.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2005 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Storm-related repairs and delays at Northrop Grumman Corp.'s massive Gulf Coast shipyards will cost the defense contractor $1 billion and shave 2005 earnings by about 9%, the company said Monday. It was the most detailed assessment yet of the effects of hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Century City-based Northrop Grumman, which builds destroyers and other vessels at yards in New Orleans and the Mississippi cities of Pascagoula and Gulfport.
NATIONAL
October 9, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Like most of those whose lives were upended by Hurricane Katrina, 52-year-old school bus driver Emanuel Wilson can thank the federal government for the fact that he has money to pay rent. He's also been given food stamps to make sure he can buy groceries. And if he had young children, the government would almost certainly be helping them get back to school. But what Wilson needs is chemotherapy, and that is something the government seems unable to help him with.
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