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Rita Klimova

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NEWS
January 1, 1994
Rita Klimova, 61, a former dissident who became Czechoslovakia's first ambassador to the United States after the overthrow of Communism. Klimova taught political economics at Charles University in Prague until her dismissal after the 1968 Soviet-led invasion that crushed Alexander Dubcek's liberal reforms. In 1989, she became spokeswoman for the peaceful "Velvet Revolution" that toppled Communism and brought Vaclav Havel to the presidency.
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NEWS
January 1, 1994
Rita Klimova, 61, a former dissident who became Czechoslovakia's first ambassador to the United States after the overthrow of Communism. Klimova taught political economics at Charles University in Prague until her dismissal after the 1968 Soviet-led invasion that crushed Alexander Dubcek's liberal reforms. In 1989, she became spokeswoman for the peaceful "Velvet Revolution" that toppled Communism and brought Vaclav Havel to the presidency.
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NEWS
April 11, 1990 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Czechoslovakian ambassador is perusing the vast expanse of products in the dairy case of the capital's premier supermarket. There are eight kinds of milk: 1%, 2%, skim, low-fat, regular, buttermilk and chocolate- and strawberry-flavored. "This is difficult," the ambassador says as she reaches for carton after carton, examining the labels. "There are so many choices." Since coming to America on Feb. 12, choices have shaped every aspect of Rita Klimova's life.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Czechoslovakian ambassador is perusing the vast expanse of products in the dairy case of the capital's premier supermarket. There are eight kinds of milk: 1%, 2%, skim, low-fat, regular, buttermilk and chocolate- and strawberry-flavored. "This is difficult," the ambassador says as she reaches for carton after carton, examining the labels. "There are so many choices." Since coming to America on Feb. 12, choices have shaped every aspect of Rita Klimova's life.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The new Czechoslovak foreign minister has chosen a 57-year-old woman who has become the internationally known voice of the opposition Civic Forum movement here to be the nation's next ambassador to the United States, The Times has learned. The new ambassador would be Rita Klimova, who has served as a Civic Forum strategist but who is more widely known as the simultaneous translator for the organization's press conferences.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Havel on Walters' Stage: Interviewing 53-year-old Czechoslovakian president Vaclav Havel was "like something out of a Havel play," Barbara Walters said of her 16-minute session with him in Prague. The interview airs tonight on ABC's "20/20" at 10 p.m. and is interpreted by Rita Klimova, Brooklyn-born Czechoslovakian ambassador to the U.S. Playwright-turned-president Havel told Walters that "the time is coming when . . . politics should be taken over by intellectuals."
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Rita Klimova, a former teacher and dissident, was appointed ambassador to the United States by President Vaclav Havel today, the CTK news agency reported. The appointment comes on the eve of Havel's visit to the United States, where he is scheduled to meet with President Bush on Feb. 20. Klimova, 58, was a political economics teacher at Charles University in Prague before she was dismissed for her political views after the 1968 Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | From Associated Press
Here are some facts and figures about the foreign diplomatic community in Washington: HOW MANY--Washington is home to 22,102 career foreign diplomats and their dependents, including ambassadors of 143 countries and the delegation of the Commission of the European Communities. The ambassadors of seven other countries reside in New York. The United States does not have diplomatic relations with Cuba, Iraq and Iran.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | From the Times Washington Bureau
NEW ENVIRONMENT: When President Bush chose him to head the Environmental Protection Agency, William K. Reilly was considered a nonpartisan, patrician defender of the earth and all its creatures. Conservatives viewed him suspiciously. No more. Now Reilly is giving sharply partisan stump speeches, winning cheers from audiences, such as the recent Southern Republican Leadership Conference in Raleigh, N.C.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The new Czechoslovak foreign minister has chosen a 57-year-old woman who has become the internationally known voice of the opposition Civic Forum movement here to be the nation's next ambassador to the United States, The Times has learned. The new ambassador would be Rita Klimova, who has served as a Civic Forum strategist but who is more widely known as the simultaneous translator for the organization's press conferences.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the minister of education announced last fall that the teaching of Russian was no longer compulsory in Hungarian schools, students celebrated by shredding their Russian textbooks. "Russian was forced on us," student Krisztina Karoly, 20, told a reporter recently. "It will always be considered the language of oppression." She said that English is "suddenly very fashionable, but there is a big shortage of teachers."
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Civic Forum activist Jaroslav Koran's eyes sparkled as he stood in Wenceslas Square and admired "his" building. He described the way he sees it in his imagination. Near the second-floor windows is a big television screen with a loudspeaker broadcasting history in the making. From a balcony above, Civic Forum leaders are addressing the crowd, and they can be seen half a mile away.
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