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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1999 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Education has always been at the center of Rita M. Cepeda's world. Cepeda, named president of Santa Ana College on Monday, has worked for the state's community college system for more than two decades. But even before that, the need to learn changed her life. When she was growing up in Nicaragua, her father worried that she would not get the education he wanted her to have. So he moved 11-year-old Rita, her three sisters and brother to Long Beach in 1963.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2004 | Susan Anasagasti, Times Staff Writer
The Rancho Santiago Community College District trustees voted unanimously this week to remove the president of Santa Ana College from the job she held for five years. Rita M. Cepeda will become one of three district vice chancellors, a move faculty and a former administrator describe as a demotion. Trustee Lisa Woolery said Cepeda would help Chancellor Edward Hernandez with "district-wide projects. This just happened," she said. "We're still working it out."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2004 | Susan Anasagasti, Times Staff Writer
The Rancho Santiago Community College District trustees voted unanimously this week to remove the president of Santa Ana College from the job she held for five years. Rita M. Cepeda will become one of three district vice chancellors, a move faculty and a former administrator describe as a demotion. Trustee Lisa Woolery said Cepeda would help Chancellor Edward Hernandez with "district-wide projects. This just happened," she said. "We're still working it out."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1999 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Education has always been at the center of Rita M. Cepeda's world. Cepeda, named president of Santa Ana College on Monday, has worked for the state's community college system for more than two decades. But even before that, the need to learn changed her life. When she was growing up in Nicaragua, her father worried that she would not get the education he wanted her to have. So he moved 11-year-old Rita, her three sisters and brother to Long Beach in 1963.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2001
The predominance of Spanish-speakers in Santa Ana surprises nobody. School officials are so concerned about the struggles of poor children to speak English that they have been talking this fall about making kindergarten a two-year program. The city has long known that nearly three-fourths of students in the Santa Ana Unified School District come to class speaking only Spanish.
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