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Rita Russo

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1993 | JOHN HURST
The short, middle-aged ex-nun pauses in her task of handing out food to the poor at a storefront center on South Broadway. She flashes a wide, engaging grin and admits that sometimes some of the people she serves are not as appreciative as they might be and that she is not always as understanding as she could be. But then she reflects on the lives of her clients: "I know that sometimes their anger comes from the conditions they live in.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1993 | JOHN HURST
The short, middle-aged ex-nun pauses in her task of handing out food to the poor at a storefront center on South Broadway. She flashes a wide, engaging grin and admits that sometimes some of the people she serves are not as appreciative as they might be and that she is not always as understanding as she could be. But then she reflects on the lives of her clients: "I know that sometimes their anger comes from the conditions they live in.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1989
Re "The Limits of Compassion" (by Michael Quintanilla, Aug 2): This article was compelling reading for me, an ex-social worker of 25 years. I identify with the feelings of frustration expressed by Chuck Teixeira and Rita Russo. I feel the answer to Michael Quintanilla's question of "why the burnout?" needs to be taken a step further. Our society is not committed to solving social/health problems. We are committed to making it appear that we are.
NEWS
September 16, 1993 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a little office in Palms, Irving Cramer has built a charity organization that grants $1.65 million a year to organizations fighting hunger across the United States, and now across the world, all the way to Bosnia. Although it has also responded to crises in Somalia and Kurdistan, Mazon--the word means food in Hebrew--devotes most of its efforts to hunger in America. "But there are situations we find too compelling to turn our backs on," Cramer said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1991 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Because the level of police drama on television is unusually high, movies about police are often at a disadvantage. Compared to TV, a passable police film may come across as sub-par. Heywood Gould, the writer-director of the new Michael Keaton film "One Good Cop," understands that you have to come up with something out of the ordinary to compete. But out of the ordinary isn't the same thing as good.
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, Times Staff Writer
Less than a block from where Chuck Teixeira counsels the homeless, two men huddle, sharing a drug-filled syringe, injecting each other in the neck. Around them more homeless men and women mingle aimlessly amid the sidewalk squalor and odor of urine from where they camped the night before on flattened cardboard boxes and newspapers wadded into pillows.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | PAUL CIOTTI, Times Staff Writer
They come in battered Pintos with bald tires and missing fenders. They get off buses, transfers in hand. They walk in off the street pushing expropriated shopping carts. Or they drive up in shiny new vans with chrome roof racks and stereo speakers fore and aft. But no matter how they arrive at the county's 475 food pantries, the stories they tell have a common theme--for whatever reason, they live their lives so close to the economic edge that anything from a flat tire to an extra-large utility bill is enough to put them in the one place they never expected to find themselves: standing in line for free food.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Naomi Green spends a lot of time these days standing in lines at South Los Angeles charities, waiting for free food. "I visit the food pantries when I have a ride and thank God for whatever I can get," said the 59-year-old retiree, talking with friends in the shaded courtyard of a relief agency. Since the riots, the small garden of her 61st Street home has received less attention than usual. But there is no choice.
NEWS
November 21, 1994 | SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Nuns and church volunteers who run Los Angeles' charitable food pantries circle like wily prizefighters around a pile of boxes filled with dented food cans and torn cereal packages at the Los Angeles Regional Foodbank. Today is "Monday Madness," the bank's weekly food grab, where affiliated pantries cart off damaged foods donated by supermarkets and food companies. "No pushing! No fighting! No name-calling!" a food bank employee warns.
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