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January 29, 1990 | From United Press International
Copyright Suit Filed Against 'Look Who's Talking': A suit filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles accuses writer-director Amy Heckerling of taking the inspiration for the hit movie "Look Who's Talking" from a student film. The suit seeks $20 million in damages from Tri-Star Pictures for violating the copyright of Jeanne Meyers and Rita Stern, two former students of the American Film Institute, who claim to have made a film with the same plot.
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BUSINESS
January 29, 1990 | From United Press International
Copyright Suit Filed Against 'Look Who's Talking': A suit filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles accuses writer-director Amy Heckerling of taking the inspiration for the hit movie "Look Who's Talking" from a student film. The suit seeks $20 million in damages from Tri-Star Pictures for violating the copyright of Jeanne Meyers and Rita Stern, two former students of the American Film Institute, who claim to have made a film with the same plot.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS, TIMES FILM EDITOR
Writer-director Amy Heckerling took her inspiration for her hit movie "Look Who's Talking" from a 20-minute student film and other materials supplied her four years before "Look Who's Talking" was released last fall, according to a $20-million lawsuit filed against her and Tri-Star Pictures Tuesday. The suit accuses Tri-Star, which is distributing "Look Who's Talking," of conspiring with Heckerling to infringe Jeanne Meyers and Rita Stern's copyright.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS, TIMES FILM EDITOR
Writer-director Amy Heckerling took her inspiration for her hit movie "Look Who's Talking" from a 20-minute student film and other materials supplied her four years before "Look Who's Talking" was released last fall, according to a $20-million lawsuit filed against her and Tri-Star Pictures Tuesday. The suit accuses Tri-Star, which is distributing "Look Who's Talking," of conspiring with Heckerling to infringe Jeanne Meyers and Rita Stern's copyright.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY
Writing tends to be a solitary occupation for most and an occupation, in the truest sense, for precious few. It is not the sort of activity that easily lends itself to "how-to" displays or in-depth analysis on the order of Bravo's "Inside the Actors Studio."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Look Who's Settling: Tri-Star Pictures has settled a copyright-infringement lawsuit in Los Angeles with two writers who charged that the film company and writer Amy Heckerling plagiarized the premise for the 1989 multimillion-dollar smash film "Look Who's Talking." Writers Jeanne Meyers and Rita Stern filed suit against Tri-Star 18 months ago, claiming the plot for the movie was lifted from a 1984 student film they created titled "Special Delivery."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2010 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Max Lawrence, a successful meatpacker whose appreciation of midcentury modern design led him to co-found Architectural Pottery, an influential Los Angeles company that produced sculptural planters and urns coveted by collectors today, died of natural causes July 25 at his Los Angeles home, said his son, Damon. He was 98. Lawrence founded Architectural Pottery in 1950 with his wife, Rita, whose business and aesthetic savvy helped the company thrive for more than three decades. Showcasing the talents of potters such as David Cressey, John Follis and Rex Goode, they sold their creations to the vanguard of the modernist architecture movement that took root in Southern California in the post- World War II era. "Their role in establishing the unique look of midcentury California design can't be overstated.
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