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Rita Walters

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OPINION
May 30, 2008
Re "In Bradley's shadow," Opinion, May 25 The summary of black politics in Los Angeles since the era of Tom Bradley fails to mention Rita Walters. Walters comes from the same political tradition as Tom Bradley. To neglect to mention her is to neglect to remember the first African American woman to sit on the City Council. She is another of the trailblazers for Board of Supervisors candidates Bernard C. Parks and Mark Ridley-Thomas. Teresa Riddle Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
John Greenwood, a political moderate who headed the Los Angeles Board of Education in the mid-1980s and later served as president of the Southern California branch of the nonprofit Coro organization, has died. He was 67. Greenwood died of a heart attack Oct. 11 in San Pedro, where he and his family had lived for many years, said his sister-in-law Peg Greenwood. First elected to the school board in 1979, Greenwood saw his eight-year tenure begin at a time of deep contention among trustees and in the sprawling district over court-ordered mandatory school busing for integration, which had been launched the previous year.
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SPORTS
November 22, 1985
Rita Walters reveals a very narrow attitude about sports when she states, "People forget that the purpose of school is not to play ball or participate in drama" and "the education opportunities . . . are more important than having a winning team or having a team at all." (Staying Above C Level, Nov. 16.) This is so educationally narrow that I would call it athletic bigotry. Her no-fail/C-average policy treats high school athletes as second-class student-citizens. In all the discussions and comments concerning this issue, I have yet to come across this point of view: Why should it be more difficult to play ball than to earn a high school diploma?
OPINION
May 30, 2008
Re "In Bradley's shadow," Opinion, May 25 The summary of black politics in Los Angeles since the era of Tom Bradley fails to mention Rita Walters. Walters comes from the same political tradition as Tom Bradley. To neglect to mention her is to neglect to remember the first African American woman to sit on the City Council. She is another of the trailblazers for Board of Supervisors candidates Bernard C. Parks and Mark Ridley-Thomas. Teresa Riddle Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rita Walters, an 11-year member of the Los Angeles school board and its only black, said Wednesday she will run for the City Council, becoming the second influential board member opting not to seek reelection this year. The absence of Walters and board President Jackie Goldberg, who announced in November that she would not seek reelection, will substantially change the dynamics of the seven-member board, where four seats will be on the ballot this spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY and JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Police Department on Thursday expanded its criminal investigation of Mayor Tom Bradley's office after disclosures that Bradley aides used city offices and equipment to assist the City Council campaign of Rita Walters. Police Chief Daryl F. Gates said a report in The Times on Thursday detailing the assistance to Walters "is consistent with what we have been looking at" since last November, when the department began a probe of improper campaign activities in the mayor's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1993 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a saying at Los Angeles City Hall: It takes a year just to find the bathroom and four years to become a real player on the City Council. Mike Hernandez, Mark Ridley-Thomas and Rita Walters have located the restrooms, all right. But less than two years into their terms, they have earned widely mixed marks as they try to complete the second part of the equation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY and RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles police detectives began arranging interviews Friday with City Council candidate Rita Walters, her campaign staff and aides to Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley after disclosures that mayoral staff members used city offices and equipment to assist the Walters campaign. Detectives began "knocking on doors," Lt. Fred Reno said, but he declined to say who had been approached or whether anyone had been interviewed by Friday afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1999
Re "Riordan Seeks City Charter Compromise," Jan. 9: The article stated that your sources said my present employer, City Council member Rita Walters, made political and professional threats against me as part of a campaign to defeat the Los Angeles Elected Charter Commission's proposal for a new city charter. That is simply untrue. I have known Rita Walters for over 15 years. She is a person of honesty, compassion and, most of all, a person of integrity. While the council member and I may differ in our views about charter reform, she respects my position as an elected charter commissioner.
NEWS
July 2, 1986
Rita Walters, one of the most steadfast liberals on the Los Angeles school board, was unanimously reelected president of the board. Walters, 55, became the first black woman to head the board when she was elected president last year. A member of the board for seven years, Walters was a leading advocate of the rule requiring all student athletes to pass all courses and maintain a C average.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard J. Riordan this week will propose a 14% increase in spending on libraries, promising longer hours and thousands of new books as part of the final city budget of his eight years in office. Riordan, an avid reader and book collector, announced the new spending amid a campaign by friends and supporters to rename the downtown Central Library after the mayor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1999
I was deeply concerned by comments made by my former colleagues, City Council members Michael Feuer and Rita Walters, regarding my request for a state audit of the L.A. Fire Department's use of helicopters ("Competing Copter Audit Upsets Council," May 26). Feuer stated that it was "dumb" for me to seek a state audit and that it duplicates the city study. He also threatened me with political payback for requesting the state audit. Walters asked why I would push for such an audit, since I just got elected and don't have to run for office for another four years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1999
Re "Riordan Seeks City Charter Compromise," Jan. 9: The article stated that your sources said my present employer, City Council member Rita Walters, made political and professional threats against me as part of a campaign to defeat the Los Angeles Elected Charter Commission's proposal for a new city charter. That is simply untrue. I have known Rita Walters for over 15 years. She is a person of honesty, compassion and, most of all, a person of integrity. While the council member and I may differ in our views about charter reform, she respects my position as an elected charter commissioner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1997
The City Council votes today on the detailed financing plans for Los Angeles' proposed sports arena. The safe bet is that it will ratify the deal, as it did in January and ought to do again today. In the earlier vote, 13 of the 15 members supported a broad outline of the financial package now before the council. This is the opportunity to nail down the details. Approval of this big league project would match the best interests of the city in terms of development and revenues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key member of the Los Angeles City Council expressed serious reservations Wednesday about the proposal to build a new hockey and basketball arena downtown, refusing to vote for the project during a committee hearing and saying she may oppose it when it comes to the council floor Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1997 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mounting what could be a last-gasp effort on behalf of Los Angeles Police Chief Willie L. Williams, Councilwoman Rita Walters on Friday introduced a motion calling on the City Council to take over the Williams issue and decide whether he deserves a second term as chief. Initially, Walters' motion would summon police commissioners to the council so they could be questioned about the reasons for their unanimous vote rejecting Williams' application for reappointment.
NEWS
July 1, 1986
Rita Walters, one of the most steadfast liberals on the Los Angeles school board, was unanimously reelected president of the board today. Walters, 55, became the first black woman to head the board when she was elected president last year. The first black board president was the Rev. James Jones in 1968. During her seven years on the board, Walters has fought busing to achieve integration and has successfully pushed a C-average-no-fail eligibility rule for student athletes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1991
Rita Walters was sworn in Friday as the first black councilwoman in Los Angeles history during a ceremony in the council chambers packed with hundreds of friends, family and other supporters. The brief ceremony was preceded by a council vote certifying the results of the June 4 municipal elections, in which Walters edged out 9th District council aide Bob Gay by only 76 votes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1996 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Take that! City Councilwoman Rita Walters and Mayor Richard Riordan have taken their personal feud out of City Hall and to the streets--or at least to the mailboxes of thousands of Los Angeles residents. In the latest round of this escalating squabble, Walters has fired off a letter to 20,000 constituents blasting Riordan's fiscal and law enforcement policies. It follows an earlier mailer from Riordan slamming Walters' fiscal and law enforcement policies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1996
Re The Spin, by Bill Boyarsky, Feb. 2: The story of Chang-Hwan Pyon and Rita Walters, chairwoman of the committee which must approve his nomination, does not have to be a parable of the new Los Angeles where cultures live in mutual misunderstanding. Walters just has to learn a little cultural sensitivity. The volume of the message is not as important as the content of it. She claims it was "quickly apparent .J.J. he was having great difficulty with the language." Perhaps she might have given him a chance to get a word in edgewise.
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