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Rita Wilde

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March 4, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rita Wilde's first act as she ascended to the job of program director at KLOS-FM (95.5) was a tough one. She had to remove a popular deejay, a presence on the rock station's airwaves for 16 years. The unlucky jock: Rita Wilde.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Lee Margulies
After 25 years at KLOS-FM (95.5) -- as a DJ, then music director and most recently as program director -- Rita Wilde is departing the classic rock station today. In a statement issued by the station, neither Wilde nor KLOS President John H. Davison offered an explanation, and Wilde didn't say what she'd be doing next. Davison praised her passionate devotion to the station and Wilde said she was departing "with my dignity and integrity intact." She'll be replaced by Bob Buchmann, former program director at classic-rock station WAXQ-FM in New York.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Lee Margulies
After 25 years at KLOS-FM (95.5) -- as a DJ, then music director and most recently as program director -- Rita Wilde is departing the classic rock station today. In a statement issued by the station, neither Wilde nor KLOS President John H. Davison offered an explanation, and Wilde didn't say what she'd be doing next. Davison praised her passionate devotion to the station and Wilde said she was departing "with my dignity and integrity intact." She'll be replaced by Bob Buchmann, former program director at classic-rock station WAXQ-FM in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rita Wilde's first act as she ascended to the job of program director at KLOS-FM (95.5) was a tough one. She had to remove a popular deejay, a presence on the rock station's airwaves for 16 years. The unlucky jock: Rita Wilde.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1997 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jim Ladd brings his thematic classic rock programming and outspoken social commentary back to the air today, taking over the 6 to 10 p.m. weekday evening slots on KLOS-FM (95.5). Ladd, returning for his third stint at the station since the mid-'70s, is joined by several other familiar voices in a new KLOS lineup that gives the station a strong connection to the glory years of the '70s and '80s when it and the now-defunct KMET-FM battled it out as Los Angeles' top rock outlets.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you thought the move of the Baka Boyz from hip-hop station KPWR-FM (105.9) to rival KKBT-FM (92.3) constituted a shake-up of the L.A. radio landscape, well, as Southern Californians often say, that wasn't "the big one." In fact, rumblings of a potentially more intense airwaves temblor are jostling broadcasting offices around town right now: Kevin & Bean, the star morning duo at alternative-rock trend-setter KROQ-FM (106.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2008 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
Radio programs that survive in Los Angeles for a quarter-century come along about as frequently as a SigAlert-free day on the freeway. On that front alone, this year's 25th anniversary of "Breakfast With the Beatles" constitutes a minor miracle, to say nothing of the longevity of a weekly show devoted to the music of one band that released just a little more than 200 songs during a short but spectacular eight-year recording career.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2008 | Randy Lewis, Lewis is a Times staff writer.
The downfall of Soviet Communism took 70 years, but "Chinese Democracy" appears to be in jeopardy after just two weeks. The Guns N' Roses album that was 17 years in the making climbed only as high as No. 3 when it debuted on the national sales chart. It has tumbled to No. 18 in its second week of release. That's a disturbing sign for the most expensive to produce album ever in rock, the cost once estimated at $13 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1997 | ANGIE CHUANG
CLASSICAL MUSIC Orchestra's President Adamant: Facing escalating protests at home and abroad against his orchestra's refusal to hire women, the president of the Vienna Philharmonic dug in his heels on Austrian radio Thursday, according to Reuters. "This is a private club and we won't have our arm twisted. If people keep trying to pressure us [into admitting women], we'll dissolve ourselves," Werner Resel said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1997
The major networks premiered 15 new series last week as the 1997-98 television season officially got underway, and a fair number of viewers sampled many of those new shows. This week, however, may be more crucial in determining success--namely, who comes back for second helpings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1997 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You may have noticed that life in L.A. just hasn't been as demented as usual--at least on the radio. Dr. Demento, whose two-hour show of novelty recordings has been an L.A. radio institution for 27 years, has been off the air in the market since his most recent home, KSCA-FM (101.9), was sold and switched from its adult alternative format to "Mexican regional" music programming in February. Without an L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2000 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just like Ebenezer Scrooge, it seems that Los Angeles radio executives have had a Christmas epiphany, and this year they are sharing their bounty by stuffing special seasonal concerts into this weekend like gifts under a tree. In recent years, rock-oriented KROQ-FM (106.7) dominated the holiday landscape with its "Almost Acoustic Christmas" shows, complemented by a handful of lesser events from others. This year the competition's intensified.
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