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NEWS
July 26, 2010
The effects of methylphenidate -- a stimulant used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder -- are interesting. The drug clearly helps many people with ADHD with mental focus and concentration. And although many parents fear giving the medication to children diagnosed with ADHD because it is a drug (and drugs can be abused), studies show that those children and teens who benefit from the medication are less likely to abuse drugs. Kids with ADHD who are untreated are at higher risk for substance abuse issues.
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SPORTS
October 3, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
Embattled quarterback Josh Freeman has been released by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, according to multiple reports. The development comes after Tampa Bay spent several days trying to trade him but evidently couldn't find a taker. In cutting 2009 first-round pick, the Buccaneers are on the hook for $6 million in remaining salary. Freeman, the No. 17 pick, reportedly was fined by the team twice in the last month for conduct detrimental to the team. Previously, he had been stripped of his team captain designation and missed the team picture because he overslept.
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HEALTH
May 15, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Fifteen years ago, Dr. Lawrence H. Diller, a pediatrician from Walnut Creek, ignited a national debate over the steep rise in children being diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and treated with stimulant medication. Diller's 1996 book, "Running on Ritalin," suggested that ADHD was being over-diagnosed, and that Ritalin, and the many formulations of amphetamine-like drugs that would follow, was being prescribed in many cases to children who would respond well to family therapy and tailored programs and routines at home and at school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2013 | By Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein
Journalist Michael Hastings' family was about to stage an intervention to try to  get the reporter into “detox” on the same day his Mercedes burst into flames after hitting a tree, Los Angeles coroner's officials said Tuesday. Hastings, 33, died instantly, with the massive blunt-force trauma killing him "within seconds” of the single-vehicle collision on June 18 in Hancock Park, the report said. No alcohol was detected in his system, but there were traces of drugs, according to the report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2000
"Detour for Ritalin Issue" (editorial, Oct. 27) states in part: "Part of the problem with Ritalin use, or overuse, is that the definition of ADHD is ambiguous." You also conclude that the matter "belongs in the laboratories of science not the halls of justice"--referring to the recent lawsuits in California and New Jersey. When you get to looking at the facts closely, you might consider the possibility of another opinion on this matter. It is the purported science that has saddled us with the said ambiguities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1988
Thanks for printing the Ritalin controversy article. I sent a copy to my sister. She was having difficulty controlling her 11-year-old son, so when the school counselors recommended he be put on Ritalin, she was all for it. She doesn't discipline the child and cannot confront his behavior so she welcomes this drug which slows him down, ruins his appetite and makes him controllable. It is an incompetent and lazy method of control and it is damaging to his physical and mental health. Modern teachers are giving this poison to the children to handle classroom tension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2013 | By Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein
Journalist Michael Hastings' family was about to stage an intervention to try to  get the reporter into “detox” on the same day his Mercedes burst into flames after hitting a tree, Los Angeles coroner's officials said Tuesday. Hastings, 33, died instantly, with the massive blunt-force trauma killing him "within seconds” of the single-vehicle collision on June 18 in Hancock Park, the report said. No alcohol was detected in his system, but there were traces of drugs, according to the report.
HEALTH
December 25, 2006
Regarding your article on attention-deficit disorder ["On Their Terms," Dec. 18], I'm a bit confused about the quote from a 31-year-old claiming he is part of the "first generation" of Ritalin kids. I just celebrated my 47th birthday and my strongest childhood memory is of a child psychiatrist telling me he was going to give me some pills "to make me good." At the private school for gifted children I attended in the early '70s, the school nurse was there, it seems, only to dispense the midday doses of Ritalin to nearly half the student body.
SPORTS
October 3, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
Embattled quarterback Josh Freeman has been released by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, according to multiple reports. The development comes after Tampa Bay spent several days trying to trade him but evidently couldn't find a taker. In cutting 2009 first-round pick, the Buccaneers are on the hook for $6 million in remaining salary. Freeman, the No. 17 pick, reportedly was fined by the team twice in the last month for conduct detrimental to the team. Previously, he had been stripped of his team captain designation and missed the team picture because he overslept.
NEWS
July 15, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Four in 10 kids who get a diagnosis of either depression or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) end up getting both diagnoses sometime in their young lives. That means a lot will spend some part of their adolescence taking two psychiatric medications: methylphenidate (better known by its commercial name, Ritalin) and fluoxetine (better known as Prozac, the only of the new-generation antidepressants approved for kids as young as 8 years old). A new study conducted on rats suggests that taking that combination of drugs may change the adults they will become in ways that are distinctly troubling.
HEALTH
May 15, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Fifteen years ago, Dr. Lawrence H. Diller, a pediatrician from Walnut Creek, ignited a national debate over the steep rise in children being diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and treated with stimulant medication. Diller's 1996 book, "Running on Ritalin," suggested that ADHD was being over-diagnosed, and that Ritalin, and the many formulations of amphetamine-like drugs that would follow, was being prescribed in many cases to children who would respond well to family therapy and tailored programs and routines at home and at school.
NEWS
July 26, 2010
The effects of methylphenidate -- a stimulant used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder -- are interesting. The drug clearly helps many people with ADHD with mental focus and concentration. And although many parents fear giving the medication to children diagnosed with ADHD because it is a drug (and drugs can be abused), studies show that those children and teens who benefit from the medication are less likely to abuse drugs. Kids with ADHD who are untreated are at higher risk for substance abuse issues.
HEALTH
December 25, 2006
Regarding your article on attention-deficit disorder ["On Their Terms," Dec. 18], I'm a bit confused about the quote from a 31-year-old claiming he is part of the "first generation" of Ritalin kids. I just celebrated my 47th birthday and my strongest childhood memory is of a child psychiatrist telling me he was going to give me some pills "to make me good." At the private school for gifted children I attended in the early '70s, the school nurse was there, it seems, only to dispense the midday doses of Ritalin to nearly half the student body.
SCIENCE
October 17, 2006 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
The first systematic study of using Ritalin to treat preschool children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder has found that the drug reduced their symptoms but caused greater side effects than usually seen in older children, researchers said Monday. The findings mean "very small children may benefit but they should be closely monitored," said Dr. Thomas R. Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, which paid for the $18-million study.
NATIONAL
February 10, 2006 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel Thursday urged that the strongest possible safety warning be issued for drugs used by millions of children and adults to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, because of emerging concern that they may increase the risks of heart attacks, strokes and sudden death. The FDA had called the drug safety experts together to help design further research into such risks.
HEALTH
February 7, 2005 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
Ryan SMITH remembers the night, during his junior year of high school, when a friend gave him his first Vicodin. "It felt so incredible. I remember thinking, 'I am going to do this for the rest of my life,' " he says. Over the next year, Smith, now 22, and his friends moved on to other pills -- Xanax, Valium, OxyContin and the attention deficit disorder medication Adderall, called "kiddie cocaine" for its ability to be crushed and snorted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Two teenagers were arrested Thursday following the hospitalization a day earlier of 13 Antelope Valley High School students who took illicitly obtained Ritalin, authorities said. Sheriff's deputies said the girls, 14 and 16, face possible criminal charges for allegedly possessing and distributing a controlled substance. The 14-year-old remains in juvenile hall and the 16-year-old was released to her parents.
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