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Ritalin Drug

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NEWS
April 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A medical examiner in Pontiac, Mich., said that long-term use of Ritalin, a drug used to treat hyperactive children, may have led to a 14-year-old boy's death. Oakland County Medical Examiner Ljubisa Dragovic concluded that the boy died of a heart attack that was probably caused by 10 years of taking Ritalin. Some experts question his theory, citing that Ritalin has been shown to be extremely safe.
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NEWS
April 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A medical examiner in Pontiac, Mich., said that long-term use of Ritalin, a drug used to treat hyperactive children, may have led to a 14-year-old boy's death. Oakland County Medical Examiner Ljubisa Dragovic concluded that the boy died of a heart attack that was probably caused by 10 years of taking Ritalin. Some experts question his theory, citing that Ritalin has been shown to be extremely safe.
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NEWS
March 14, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Some teen-agers are getting a cheap high off Ritalin, a drug widely used to treat hyperactivity in children. They buy or steal Ritalin from classmates who have been prescribed the drug, said Muskegon Detective John Workman, who arrested a high school student last week on charges of selling the medication. Several tablets, costing 25 cents each, are crushed and then either inhaled or injected, he said.
NEWS
March 21, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House said Monday that the federal government will intensify research on medications used to treat preschoolers for behavioral disorders, responding to growing concerns about the high number of youngsters who take prescription drugs such as Ritalin and Prozac.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | JOEL SAPPELL and ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In recent years, a national debate flared over Ritalin, a drug used for more than three decades to treat hyperactivity in children. Across the country, multimillion-dollar lawsuits were filed by parents who contended that their children had been harmed by the drug. Major news organizations--including The Times--devoted extensive coverage to whether youngsters were being turned into emotionally disturbed addicts by psychiatrists and pediatricians who prescribed Ritalin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1990
A Glendale Superior Court judge on Thursday declared a mistrial in a lawsuit involving the alleged forced use of the drug Ritalin after a witness referred to the race of the child involved, in violation of an earlier court order. Judge Joseph Kalin was presiding over what lawyers say is the first trial seeking damages from a school district for allegedly encouraging the use of Ritalin, an amphetamine-like drug used to treat hyperactive children.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Researchers have for the first time identified a brain abnormality associated with hyperactivity, the disorder that causes up to 5% of children to be restless, inattentive and often disruptive in the classroom. Using a highly sensitive imaging technique to observe the activity of brain cells, psychiatrists from the National Institute of Mental Health found decreased activity in the portions of the brain that are involved in control of attention and motor functions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1990
In what has been described as the first lawsuit of its kind to go to trial, lawyers for a Glendale woman and her 11-year-old son on Monday told a jury that the Glendale School District and a Los Angeles County doctor forced the boy to take a harmful hyperactivity drug, causing permanent and severe side effects. Adelia Lorenzo, who is seeking $5 million, claims that her son, Michael, suffers headaches and depression because he used the controversial drug Ritalin for three months in 1987.
NEWS
March 21, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House said Monday that the federal government will intensify research on medications used to treat preschoolers for behavioral disorders, responding to growing concerns about the high number of youngsters who take prescription drugs such as Ritalin and Prozac.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | From The Washington Post
Doctors are prescribing stimulants such as Ritalin and an anti-depressant like Prozac for preschoolers at rates that appear to be rising rapidly, according to a new study released Tuesday. The study, which examined the use of such medicines in children ages 2 to 4 in three large health systems in different parts of the United States, found the use of such drugs had doubled or even tripled from 1991 to 1995.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | From The Washington Post
Doctors are prescribing stimulants such as Ritalin and an anti-depressant like Prozac for preschoolers at rates that appear to be rising rapidly, according to a new study released Tuesday. The study, which examined the use of such medicines in children ages 2 to 4 in three large health systems in different parts of the United States, found the use of such drugs had doubled or even tripled from 1991 to 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1999
Pennsylvania chemists have produced analogues of the drug Ritalin that may be as effective as Ritalin in treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, but have fewer side effects. The new chemicals also show promise in blocking the effects of cocaine, since they bind to the same brain receptor that cocaine uses. As many as 1.5 million American children take Ritalin, but it often produces nervousness and insomnia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1997 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time the 16-year-old boy stepped into the Lake Forest office of psychologist Bunni Tobias, he had been taking Ritalin for eight years. No one had ever questioned his diagnosis--attention deficit hyperactivity disorder--or his prescribed treatment. Both were wrong.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Some teen-agers are getting a cheap high off Ritalin, a drug widely used to treat hyperactivity in children. They buy or steal Ritalin from classmates who have been prescribed the drug, said Muskegon Detective John Workman, who arrested a high school student last week on charges of selling the medication. Several tablets, costing 25 cents each, are crushed and then either inhaled or injected, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1990
A Glendale Superior Court judge on Thursday declared a mistrial in a lawsuit involving the alleged forced use of the drug Ritalin after a witness referred to the race of the child involved, in violation of an earlier court order. Judge Joseph Kalin was presiding over what lawyers say is the first trial seeking damages from a school district for allegedly encouraging the use of Ritalin, an amphetamine-like drug used to treat hyperactive children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1990
In what has been described as the first lawsuit of its kind to go to trial, lawyers for a Glendale woman and her 11-year-old son on Monday told a jury that the Glendale School District and a Los Angeles County doctor forced the boy to take a harmful hyperactivity drug, causing permanent and severe side effects. Adelia Lorenzo, who is seeking $5 million, claims that her son, Michael, suffers headaches and depression because he used the controversial drug Ritalin for three months in 1987.
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
The use of the stimulant methylphenidate, commonly known by its brand name Ritalin, to calm elementary school students who are hyperactive and inattentive has been doubling every four to seven years, according to a report in today's Journal of the American Medical Assn. In 1987, almost 6% of elementary school students in Baltimore County, Md., were being treated with the drug, an average of one in every 17 students, according to physicians Daniel J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1999
Pennsylvania chemists have produced analogues of the drug Ritalin that may be as effective as Ritalin in treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, but have fewer side effects. The new chemicals also show promise in blocking the effects of cocaine, since they bind to the same brain receptor that cocaine uses. As many as 1.5 million American children take Ritalin, but it often produces nervousness and insomnia.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Researchers have for the first time identified a brain abnormality associated with hyperactivity, the disorder that causes up to 5% of children to be restless, inattentive and often disruptive in the classroom. Using a highly sensitive imaging technique to observe the activity of brain cells, psychiatrists from the National Institute of Mental Health found decreased activity in the portions of the brain that are involved in control of attention and motor functions.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | JOEL SAPPELL and ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In recent years, a national debate flared over Ritalin, a drug used for more than three decades to treat hyperactivity in children. Across the country, multimillion-dollar lawsuits were filed by parents who contended that their children had been harmed by the drug. Major news organizations--including The Times--devoted extensive coverage to whether youngsters were being turned into emotionally disturbed addicts by psychiatrists and pediatricians who prescribed Ritalin.
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