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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2011 | By Michael Phillips, Tribune Newspapers critic
Offering moderately scary Roman Catholic "gotcha!"s to a global film audience of all creeds, "The Rite" comes from the director Mikael Hafstrom, whose previous film was the stylish supernatural thriller "1408. " This one's more conventional, but that's the exorcism sub-genre for you. The crucifix-shaped shadow of "The Exorcist" hangs heavy over each new contributor to the mythology. At one point in "The Rite," Rome's most aggressive devil exterminator, played by Anthony Hopkins, answers his young protege's mutterings with the retort: "What did you expect?
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2014 | By Chris Barton
The Bad Plus has taken on many different guises over its career, tapping the songs of Aphex Twin, Ornette Coleman and Black Sabbath along with its own to craft a sound rooted in jazz but most consistent with a genre called the Bad Plus. Now, for the ninth studio recording, the trio of pianist Ethan Iverson, bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King is taking on an orchestra. A piano trio tackling Stravinsky's knotty masterpiece "The Rite of Spring" may sound audacious. But the trio has been here before, delivering a stout take on the composer's "Variation d'Apollon" on the 2009 album "For All I Care.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By David Ng
It's hard today to imagine a ballet causing an audience to riot, but that's what happened 100 years ago when the well-heeled Parisian spectators at the Théâtre des Champs Elysées revolted against Igor Stravinsky's "The Rite of Spring. "  "Rite" debuted May 29, 1913, and its centenary will be marked during the next few weeks by music groups all over the world. In Southern California, the Pacific Symphony will pay tribute in a series of three concerts starting Thursday at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa.
SPORTS
February 28, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
PHOENIX  -- If you are escaping the cold of winter, the lure of baseball's spring training is logical. Forget the games. Here's a chance to sit in the sun and watch the blood flow back into your fingers. The lure for brothers Zach and Matt Zuvich is less understandable. They come from that frosty, iced-jammed city of San Pedro. When they sat in the stands Thursday at Camelback Ranch Stadium to watch the Dodgers, they had traded a 75-degree temperature for 76. "We left at 3 a.m. to get here," says older brother Zach, 25. "It would have been nice if he hadn't slept the entire way. " They will make the nearly seven-hour return trip after Sunday's Dodgers game and arrive back in San Pedro about 2 a.m. "I have to be at work Monday morning," says younger brother Matt, 21, who assures his chauffeur, Zach, that he will sleep all the way back too. Matt works in the hotel and restaurant business; Zach is a tugboat engineer in Los Angeles Harbor.
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1998
In "Surviving the Rites of Passover" (SoCal Style, Entertaining, by Mary Melton, April 5), Melton refers to herself as a shiksa--a pejorative on the level of the "n" word. Ann Bien Anaheim Editor's note: Rabbi Laura Geller of Temple Emanuel in Beverly Hills says "shiksa" has a strongly negative connotation, coming from the Hebrew for "abomination," but that it has entered the popular lexicon: "You're saying you're from a different background and putting yourself down in a certain way."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
BERKELEY - "The Rite of Spring" is a ballet born of violence. Stravinsky's score unfurls the furious sudden spring of his native St. Petersburg, the sounds of cracking ice on the river Neva being like gunfire. Taken from the scandalous sexuality of Russian folklore, the dance depicts a virgin sacrificed to the savage, ecstatic pleasure of "sages. " We've long ago gotten used to all this, the "Rite" having entered into its second century last month. Orchestral performances over the decades have become ever more driven.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"The Rite of Spring," having reached the 100th celebratory anniversary of its clamorous Paris premiere this spring, is the new "Four Seasons. " Igor Stravinsky's ballet score has become ubiquitous. Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl on Tuesday night in what might have seemed like yet another "Rite. " But it wasn't. The Spanish conductor produced a sizzling riot of instrumental color that properly and excitingly reminded us of what all the fuss is about.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Two new movies will compete against a royal rival this weekend. "The King's Speech," which just scooped up 12 Oscar nominations, is expanding its run and is expected to contend for the top box-office spot alongside a pair of new releases: "The Rite," starring Anthony Hopkins, and the Jason Statham action vehicle "The Mechanic. " Pre-release surveys indicate that "The Rite" is most likely to win the weekend with ticket sales of $15 million to $20 million, with most interest coming from adult males.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By Rick Schultz
Although a complete picture of Igor Stravinsky's personal and creative life is likely to remain a mystery, one thing is certain. The composer's achievement with "The Rite of Spring" in 1913 challenged the musical establishment no less than Beethoven's "Eroica" Symphony did more than a century earlier. "There's something unbelievable about how this man who wrote the early, extremely boring Symphony in E flat, and the terrible Piano Sonata could have gone from those to the 'Firebird,' and then compose the 'Rite,' a piece so utterly different and new," said Robert Craft, a conductor and Stravinsky's longtime associate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1999 | CHRISTINE CASTRO
The Vietnam Buddhist Temple in Garden Grove will hold a commemoration rite honoring Bodhisatta Quang Duc and other Vietnamese Buddhist devotees who have dedicated their lives to the cause of freedom. Duc burned himself to death in 1963 to escape the oppression of Buddhists by then-South Vietnam President Ngo Dinh Diem, temple officials say. The ceremony will be at 11 a.m. Sunday at the temple, 12292 Magnolia St. Information: (714) 534-7263.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Jon Healey
President Obama's decision to drop his pursuit of "chained CPI" -- a less generous method for calculating cost-of-living adjustments to federal benefits and income tax brackets -- sent deficit hawks into an emotional tailspin. For example, Maya MacGuineas, president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, said, "We are incredibly disappointed to learn that the president has decided to drop his proposal to correct the way in which the federal government measures inflation. " The proposal is probably the biggest concession Obama is making to Republicans, even though it in effect raises taxes (by allowing more taxpayers to creep into higher brackets)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Laura Bleiberg
In this time when news is disseminated ever more quickly, we asked our critics to list the best of culture in 2013 in tweet form: 2013 was a busy year in dance. It was difficult to catch everything. But of those performances I did see, these 10 made memories. The launch of @TheBarakBallet gives talented L.A. choreographer Melissa Barak and her compelling dancers a needed home for her detailed rep. Before Ojai, @MarkMorrisDance was @VPACatCSUN, where fans gleefully lapped up 3 of Morris' exuberant, visionary pieces, spanning 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Pasadena has changed little over the past half-century. What's new, of course, is Old Pasadena. But much of the city remains recognizably old Pasadena. That has certainly been true of the Pasadena Symphony as a bastion of tradition. It was founded in 1928, and between 1936 and 2010 it had only three music directors. All arrived having had distinguished careers and remained for a long time. Even the orchestra's home throughout those years, the Pasadena Civic Auditorium, maintained its old-Pasadena feel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2013 | By Lewis Segal
On the struggling and often confused American dance scene, the companies that make up Nederlands Dans Theater might seem to inhabit an alternative artistic universe. Think ballet line and virtuosity fused with modern dance weight and power. Think a commitment to the deepest European art-making traditions with no pandering to pop culture. Above all, think a super-ensemble: dancers who can form a superb corps one moment and perform just as superbly as principals the next. The proof was rapturously evident at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Friday when the main contingent (NDT1)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
With the drumbeats building for the release of the second movie in the "Hunger Games" franchise -- "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire" opens Nov. 22 -- it seems reasonable for the film's cast to be shaping up their future plans. Star Jennifer Lawrence will soon be seen in "American Hustle," which reteams her with director David O. Russell and costar Bradley Cooper from "Silver Linings Playbook," for which she won a lead actress Oscar. The 23-year-old could likely have her pick of pretty much any project and filmmaker pairing she wants, and it now looks as if she will be reteaming with Gary Ross, director of the first "Hunger Games" (but not the sequel)
OPINION
September 14, 2013
Re "Animal rites protest," Sept. 12 Regarding the use of live chickens in the sacrificial Orthodox Jewish ritual of kaparot, I have to ask: What would Sholem Aleichem say? In the late 19th century, this great Yiddish humorist wrote a story in which he imagined the ritual coming to an end when a flock of "shtetl" chickens go on strike. This deceptively light story can be interpreted in many different ways: as a commentary on scapegoating, anti-Semitism, superstition or animal cruelty, or as a plug for political uprising or union organizing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
When the Joffrey Ballet debuted its reconstructed "The Rite of Spring" in Los Angeles in fall 1987, it received a seismic welcome - a 5.9 on the Richter scale, to be exact. The morning after "Rite's" opening at the Music Center, a major earthquake struck Southern California. The Whittier Narrows quake, with an epicenter in the San Gabriel Valley, shook buildings in downtown L.A. and could be felt as far away as Las Vegas. The Oct. 1 temblor caused widespread damage in the area, though no subsequent performances of "Rite" were canceled by the Joffrey, then a resident company at the Music Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1987
What frustration I experienced when I read the article, "Latino Girls: Costly Rite." As a Mexican-American, I strongly resent "journalism" that makes generalizations about a group of people and serves primarily to perpetuate bias and bigotry. I'm not certain what aspect of the article offended me most. Was it really worthy of front-page coverage? Don't debutante balls and bat mitzvahs also place a financial strain on some parents? Father Douglas Ferraro, director of the Los Angeles archdiocese's office of liturgy and worship, asks "How many Hispanic families can afford to do this?"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"The Rite of Spring," having reached the 100th celebratory anniversary of its clamorous Paris premiere this spring, is the new "Four Seasons. " Igor Stravinsky's ballet score has become ubiquitous. Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl on Tuesday night in what might have seemed like yet another "Rite. " But it wasn't. The Spanish conductor produced a sizzling riot of instrumental color that properly and excitingly reminded us of what all the fuss is about.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
Bluejeans moguls Maurice and Paul Marciano have bought one of Los Angeles' most notorious real estate white elephants, the Scottish Rite Masonic Temple on Wilshire Boulevard, and they have plans to turn it into a private art museum. The imposing marble-clad edifice, which has seen little use since 1994, will undergo a major renovation to house the Marcianos' contemporary art collections. It will be operated for the most part as a private property, with occasional exhibitions open to the public.
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