Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRitter Ranch
IN THE NEWS

Ritter Ranch

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1992
Stepping into the middle of a dispute over a huge residential development, the Lancaster City Council will ask the county to require an environmental impact report before approving a $13.6-million water system for the planned 7,200-unit Ritter Ranch project west of Palmdale. The council voted 5 to 0 Monday to endorse a request by Mayor George Root that the report be required, amid concern that ground water pumped for the Ritter project could drain water supplies under Lancaster.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2005 | Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer
For a decade, "the bridge to nowhere" stood as a symbol of the bust-boom nature of development in the Antelope Valley. The rock bridge over the Amargosa Creek in Palmdale was built during the last building boom, meant to be the gateway to the Ritter Ranch development. But the project never materialized, stymied by delays, bankruptcies and a slowing housing market. But now, with Southern California in the midst of another housing boom, construction is beginning on the 7,200-home community.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1992 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of delays, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday reaffirmed its approval of a water system for a giant Antelope Valley development, setting aside objections of local residents. On a 3-1 vote, with Supervisor Mike Antonovich dissenting, the board sided with county public works officials who said the water system for the 7,200-house Ritter Ranch project would improve water pressure for fighting fires in the northwest section of the Antelope Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2003 | Karima A. Haynes, Times Staff Writer
A Texas real estate company's plan to buy sprawling Ritter Ranch on the outskirts of Palmdale has hit a legal snag that could further delay development of the site where a 20,000-resident community was first proposed a decade ago. The real estate developer, RR Property Holdings, is seeking to buy the 7,400-acre parcel owned by Ritter Ranch Development, whose 1998 bankruptcy filing halted plans to build 7,000 homes in the Leona Valley area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1992
Construction could begin by next October on the mammoth Ritter Ranch community, planned for west Palmdale, after a final City Council decision last week to annex the area, according to the project's manager. The council voted 4 to 1 Thursday to add the 17-square-mile area to Palmdale, the largest annexation in the city's 30-year history. Over 20 years, Ritter Ranch is expected to grow into a community of about 20,000 residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1997
Property foreclosures are nothing new in Palmdale, where the real estate recession has been lengthy and severe, but Wednesday's dwarfed all others. The foreclosure was against Ritter Ranch Co., the group behind what was potentially one of the largest housing developments in the state. Ritter Ranch was to be a planned community for 20,000 people located on the fringe of Palmdale. But before a single house was built, the project became mired in debt.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1997 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ritter Ranch Co., the partnership that once aimed to build a massive residential development in Palmdale, has filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection. The bankruptcy filing came three months after the company's lender, New York-based Bankers Trust Co., foreclosed on the 11,000-acre property upon which the giant Ritter Ranch development was to be built. In documents filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Woodland Hills, Ritter Ranch listed liabilities of $8,513,106 against assets of $19,659.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2000 | Bloomberg News Service
A long-delayed major property development in Palmdale may resume this summer and restore a defaulted property-improvement bond issue under a bankruptcy court plan. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Geraldine Mund in Woodland Hills recently approved a plan that lets new developers tackle a master-planned community on 7,000 acres of land known as Ritter Ranch. As part of the plan, they must pay past-due interest and principal on land-backed bonds. The city of Palmdale does not back the debt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1992 | AMY PYLE
Los Angeles County supervisors Thursday folded a giant Antelope Valley development into a restrictive community standards district, even though the property already has been annexed by the city of Palmdale, taking it out of county control. In doing so, the supervisors said they were merely creating a fall-back position that would allow them to limit development on part of Ritter Ranch if the ranch's neighbors succeed in a lawsuit aimed at invalidating the annexation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992
The Palmdale City Council has approved the environmental impact report and planning blueprint for the giant Ritter Ranch project, taking two more steps toward giving a final OK for the giant residential project. The 7,200-home development on 10,625 acres west of the city would be the largest project in Palmdale's history and one of the largest envisioned in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2002 | Wendy Thermos, Times Staff Writer
A land auction expected next month in U.S. Bankruptcy Court may resurrect long-dormant plans to develop Ritter Ranch on the outskirts of Palmdale, where a 20,000-resident mini-city was once planned. A Texas real estate company, RR Property Holdings LLC, is seeking to buy the remaining 7,400 acres owned by Ritter Ranch Development LLC, whose 1998 bankruptcy filing halted plans to build 7,000 homes in the Leona Valley area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2000 | Bloomberg News Service
A long-delayed major property development in Palmdale may resume this summer and restore a defaulted property-improvement bond issue under a bankruptcy court plan. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Geraldine Mund in Woodland Hills recently approved a plan that lets new developers tackle a master-planned community on 7,000 acres of land known as Ritter Ranch. As part of the plan, they must pay past-due interest and principal on land-backed bonds. The city of Palmdale does not back the debt.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1997 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ritter Ranch Co., the partnership that once aimed to build a massive residential development in Palmdale, has filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection. The bankruptcy filing came three months after the company's lender, New York-based Bankers Trust Co., foreclosed on the 11,000-acre property upon which the giant Ritter Ranch development was to be built. In documents filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Woodland Hills, Ritter Ranch listed liabilities of $8,513,106 against assets of $19,659.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1997
Property foreclosures are nothing new in Palmdale, where the real estate recession has been lengthy and severe, but Wednesday's dwarfed all others. The foreclosure was against Ritter Ranch Co., the group behind what was potentially one of the largest housing developments in the state. Ritter Ranch was to be a planned community for 20,000 people located on the fringe of Palmdale. But before a single house was built, the project became mired in debt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1997 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Property foreclosures are nothing new in Palmdale, where the real estate recession has been lengthy and severe, but Wednesday's dwarfed all others to date. The foreclosure was against Ritter Ranch Co., the group behind what had been billed as one of the largest new housing developments in the state. A brief court proceeding turned ownership of the 18-square-mile Ritter Ranch property over to its lender, Bankers Trust Co. of New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1996 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ritter Ranch, the giant planned community being developed on the outskirts of this desert city, is in foreclosure proceedings and could collapse in a tangle of bankruptcies and lawsuits if negotiations to save it fall through. Foreclosure proceedings were triggered earlier this month, when the Bankers Trust Co. of New York filed a notice of default against the Ritter Ranch Co., citing $26 million in outstanding payments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A countywide commission took the first step Wednesday toward allowing the city of Palmdale to annex 50 square miles of largely rural land, drawing groans from residents of the scenic Leona Valley, part of which is included in the tract. The Los Angeles County Local Agency Formation Commission voted unanimously to include the area in Palmdale's sphere of influence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1992 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leona Valley homeowners won the first round on Thursday of a years-long fight to control development in their remote rural area of the Antelope Valley. The Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission approved a community standards district for the valley, which is intended to preserve its country atmosphere by requiring that most future houses be built on two-acre lots and limiting such urban touches as curbs and cinder-block walls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1994 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The battle between the big developer and the little town is finally over. After five years, five lawsuits and a great deal of bitter feelings on both sides, the developers of the 7,200-home Ritter Ranch and the Leona Valley Town Council, which vehemently opposed the development, have called a truce. Both sides got something in the bargain, which was approved by residents of the unincorporated town over the weekend.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|