Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRiver Bed
IN THE NEWS

River Bed

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1986 | Nancy Wride
Police on Wednesday unearthed a man's body from a shallow grave in the bed of the Santa Ana River. Several hours after the body was discovered, Emilio Perales Morales, 25, a Santa Ana resident, was arrested on suspicion of murder. Morales was booked into County Jail and held on bail. Police refused to discuss why they suspect Morales of killing the victim, a 35-year-old Santa Ana resident. The cause of death had not been established late Wednesday, but an autopsy was scheduled for today.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
One of Chaz Bojórquez's fondest childhood memories is of climbing down into the L.A. River basin around Highland Park, running and sliding in 2 inches of water enclosed in a moss-covered tunnel — his "Tom Sawyer swimming pool," as he called it. For many Angelenos the L.A. River is just another concrete surface viewed from their car windows. A waterless paved gorge filled with graffiti, grit and vagrants but also a sentimental symbol of the city's cinematic history that provided a convenient location for movies such as "Terminator 2," "Grease" and "Transformers."
Advertisement
NEWS
November 28, 1985
I live considerably upstream in the Los Feliz area just west of the Golden State Freeway and a little north of Los Feliz Boulevard. Fifteen years or so ago my children and I used to spend a bit of time in the Los Angeles river bed. We would look for frogs' eggs in the spring. Usually the river bed turned black as the eggs hatched and turned into polliwogs. Later the Army engineers put up a high chain-link fence and we could no longer get down to the river bed. In the winter rainy season I still stop by to watch the muddy flood waters go swirling, sometimes 14 feet deep.
NEWS
August 17, 2004
On July 7, Ed Lulofs of Azusa went backpacking with Del Hildebrand in Canada's remote Auyuittuq National Park. Nine days later "where most people turn around," the two entered a very hazardous stretch. In this edited excerpt from his online diary (home.apu.edu/~elulofs/bp/trips.html), Lulofs describes what happened on July 16 when "my friend and strong, competent back-country traveler" took a second try at crossing swift-moving water. "I think he only made it halfway across this second time.
REAL ESTATE
May 4, 1997
Your article on Toluca Lake ("Come and Stay Awhile," by Ruth Ryon, April 13) brought back a lot of memories for me. Back in the 1920s, one of our Burbank neighbors told my dad how as a boy growing up in Hollywood they used to hike over Cahuenga Pass to go swimming in a lake near the foot of Dark Canyon Road, now Barham Boulevard. He invited us to go with him to see if we could relocate this lake. For us, living in the arid San Fernando Valley, to conceive of a lake in our midst was too much.
NEWS
November 17, 1985
Just a note of appreciation for all the hard work Dick Roraback put in to bring us his fascinating story of the present Los Angeles River ("In Search of the L.A. River," an occasional series.) I am following his tale with great interest. You see I lived my Tom Sawyer youth on the Los Angeles River in the area of the Imperial Highway bridge. That was before the "big paving extravaganza." We skinny-dipped in the pools, caught crawdads by the dozen and boiled them in an old can filled with river water and a dash of vinegar.
NEWS
August 17, 2004
On July 7, Ed Lulofs of Azusa went backpacking with Del Hildebrand in Canada's remote Auyuittuq National Park. Nine days later "where most people turn around," the two entered a very hazardous stretch. In this edited excerpt from his online diary (home.apu.edu/~elulofs/bp/trips.html), Lulofs describes what happened on July 16 when "my friend and strong, competent back-country traveler" took a second try at crossing swift-moving water. "I think he only made it halfway across this second time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Long gone are the days when hotels reserved entire floors for out-of-town fishermen tempted by the thousands of steelhead that could be seen splashing in the Ventura River. So, too, has passed the time when a tourist guide could gush, as one did in 1911, that "a fine stream flows into the ocean at the west end of the city, and from May to October the breakfast tables of Ventura need never go troutless." Since the 1950s, dams, diversions, mining and pollution have battered the once-bountiful river, from its convergence with Matilija Creek 16 miles north to the brackish lagoon at its mouth near the Ventura County Fairgrounds.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Long gone are the days when hotels reserved entire floors for out-of-town fishermen tempted by the thousands of steelhead that could be seen splashing in the Ventura River. So, too, has passed the time when a tourist guide could gush, as one did in 1911, that "a fine stream flows into the ocean at the west end of the city, and from May to October the breakfast tables of Ventura need never go trout-less." Since the 1950s, dams, diversions, mining and pollution have battered the once-bountiful river, from its convergence with Matilija Creek 16 miles north to the brackish lagoon at its mouth near the Ventura County Fairgrounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
One of Chaz Bojórquez's fondest childhood memories is of climbing down into the L.A. River basin around Highland Park, running and sliding in 2 inches of water enclosed in a moss-covered tunnel — his "Tom Sawyer swimming pool," as he called it. For many Angelenos the L.A. River is just another concrete surface viewed from their car windows. A waterless paved gorge filled with graffiti, grit and vagrants but also a sentimental symbol of the city's cinematic history that provided a convenient location for movies such as "Terminator 2," "Grease" and "Transformers."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
A passerby discovered the body of a man in the bed of the Los Angeles River on Saturday morning, Bell police said. The body of the unidentified man, believed to have been between 50 and 60 years old, was found near the Gage Avenue bridge shortly after 8 a.m. Bell police said they do not know the cause of death but called in sheriff's homicide detectives to assist with their investigation.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
Fossils from two calf-sized animals that lived in a period before the Jurassic are thought to be the oldest dinosaur remains ever found and may be from a group that helped begin the age of the dinosaurs, researchers say. A team from UC Santa Barbara and three other institutions uncovered the fossils in an ancient riverbed in Madagascar and found that they were mixed with the remains of animals known from earlier studies to have lived 227 million years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1998 | CHRIS CHI and RICHARD WARCHOL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Already under fire for hiring a contractor repeatedly cited for illegal dumping, county officials now face thousands of dollars in potential fines for allowing the contractor's crews to dig in a sensitive riverbed. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has threatened the county and contractor Tom A. Staben with up to $75,000 in daily civil and criminal penalties for excavating tons of silt from the Ventura River bed without proper authorization.
REAL ESTATE
May 4, 1997
Your article on Toluca Lake ("Come and Stay Awhile," by Ruth Ryon, April 13) brought back a lot of memories for me. Back in the 1920s, one of our Burbank neighbors told my dad how as a boy growing up in Hollywood they used to hike over Cahuenga Pass to go swimming in a lake near the foot of Dark Canyon Road, now Barham Boulevard. He invited us to go with him to see if we could relocate this lake. For us, living in the arid San Fernando Valley, to conceive of a lake in our midst was too much.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1995 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blankets, batteries, radios, boots, beer cans, bicycle parts, suitcases, sleeping bags, stripped wire, broken couches, rusty lawn chairs and five-gallon plastic drums full of mysterious substances. It sounds like a yard sale. But to the surprise of about 150 volunteers, these items were just part of a long list of junk pulled from the dusty floor of the Ventura River during a massive cleanup effort Saturday launched by a local service club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1991 | JAMES QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bed of the Los Angeles River could be used in dry weather as a roadway for car pools between North Hollywood and downtown and by trucks from there to the Los Angeles Harbor, according to a preliminary report prepared for the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission. The report by independent consultants, to be delivered to the commission on Tuesday, concludes that the proposal would cost about $700 million and could be in operation by 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1986 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
Like prospectors of a century ago panning for gold in the Mother Lode, Reg and Sylvester Marron are mining a bend of the San Luis Rey River just east of here in search of a fortune. For these brothers, however, profits don't come with shiny nuggets of bullion. Instead, they're trying to make their mint from the sand that blankets the wide river bed and its banks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
A passerby discovered the body of a man in the bed of the Los Angeles River on Saturday morning, Bell police said. The body of the unidentified man, believed to have been between 50 and 60 years old, was found near the Gage Avenue bridge shortly after 8 a.m. Bell police said they do not know the cause of death but called in sheriff's homicide detectives to assist with their investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Long gone are the days when hotels reserved entire floors for out-of-town fishermen tempted by the thousands of steelhead that could be seen splashing in the Ventura River. So, too, has passed the time when a tourist guide could gush, as one did in 1911, that "a fine stream flows into the ocean at the west end of the city, and from May to October the breakfast tables of Ventura need never go troutless." Since the 1950s, dams, diversions, mining and pollution have battered the once-bountiful river, from its convergence with Matilija Creek 16 miles north to the brackish lagoon at its mouth near the Ventura County Fairgrounds.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Long gone are the days when hotels reserved entire floors for out-of-town fishermen tempted by the thousands of steelhead that could be seen splashing in the Ventura River. So, too, has passed the time when a tourist guide could gush, as one did in 1911, that "a fine stream flows into the ocean at the west end of the city, and from May to October the breakfast tables of Ventura need never go trout-less." Since the 1950s, dams, diversions, mining and pollution have battered the once-bountiful river, from its convergence with Matilija Creek 16 miles north to the brackish lagoon at its mouth near the Ventura County Fairgrounds.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|