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November 26, 1992
Firefighters late Wednesday battled a 150-acre brush fire in the Santa Ana River channel that destroyed two structures and prompted residents to evacuate some homes. About 18 engine crews and two bulldozers attacked the fire that stretched for nearly a mile along the channel. The cause was unknown, and there was no estimate of when the fire would be contained. The blaze erupted about 7:30 p.m.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The largest river restoration ever attempted in the West — intended to support a cornucopia of wildlife and outdoor activities — has left a 62-mile stretch of the Lower Owens so overrun with cattails, cane and bulrushes that it may take decades to bring them under control. Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa turned a knob in 2006 that opened a diversion dam gate about 235 miles north of the city, putting water back into a river essentially left dry after its flows of Sierra snowmelt were diverted to the Los Angeles Aqueduct in 1913.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2009 | David Zahniser
A man was found dead Sunday in the bed of the San Gabriel River near the 60 Freeway, and the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department asked the public for information about the death. The man, who was not identified, suffered blunt force trauma to his upper body, authorities said. Homicide investigators can be reached at (323) 890-5500. -- David Zahniser
NATIONAL
July 2, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Forty-two years ago, Rae Schobinger's neighbors pitched in to lay sandbags and the city of Minot erected massive levees to try to hold back the normally tranquil Souris River that winds, shady and dreamy, through its center. Much of the town flooded that year, but Schobinger's neighborhood stayed dry. Another mass evacuation was ordered during the wet spring of 1975. After that, the people of Minot — in the way North Dakotans have of quietly pushing ahead and doing things that are hard — resolved to go along with what officials said was needed in order to fix things.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Alviso residents, who for two years have argued that weeds and silt clogging the Guadalupe River expose them to the risk of floods, will get some help this winter. On Tuesday, the Santa Clara Valley Water District board delayed a decision on whether to cut the weeds that have drastically narrowed the river channel through Alviso Slough during the last 20 years. Instead, it launched a program to find out what extra flood protection measures can be taken before this winter's rains begin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1992 | ERIC LICHTBLAU
The Orange County Board of Supervisors agreed Tuesday to pay a local engineering firm $414,000 to look for potential structural problems in seven bridges spanning the Santa Ana River. Officials want to determine whether the expansion of the river channel as part of a massive $1.5-billion federal flood-control project could damage the bridges and leave them less stable, especially in the event of an earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1992
A Los Angeles City Council panel voted 2 to 0 on Tuesday to approve spending $69,254 for training and equipping a team of 24 firefighters to rescue people who fall into the Los Angeles River channel during flooding. The idea resulted from the highly publicized drowning last February of 15-year-old Adam Bischoff of Woodland Hills after he fell into the river channel while riding his bike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1998
Even here in the city, bits of the country find ways of lingering in the most unlikely places--places that restore sanity when the mush of traffic and the jangle of cellular phones seem overwhelming. Decades of development have not been able to erase rugged slivers such as the equestrian trail that tracks the Los Angeles River between the Los Angeles Equestrian Center and Warner Bros. studios in Burbank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1990
Gov. George Deukmejian on Tuesday signed a bill that supporters describe as a first step toward turning the 58-mile-long Los Angeles River flood control channel into a park and recreation area. The measure by Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) gives the state Coastal Conservancy the authority to prepare a master recreational plan for the concrete-lined channel, which begins in the San Fernando Valley and flows into San Pedro Bay at Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1987 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
Police Tuesday discounted the theory that Patricia Lopez, 9, was abducted, saying witnesses saw her walking alone in the Santa Ana River channel minutes before she was killed. Police now believe she walked or was driven voluntarily from Santa Ana's Monte Vista Elementary School to the dry flood-control channel "because we have nothing showing us" that she was abducted, Santa Ana Police Lt. Robert Chavez said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2010 | By Melanie Hicken, Los Angeles Times
A revamped walkway along the Glendale stretch of the Los Angeles River has apparently cleared the last of its bureaucratic hurdles, and construction is now expected to begin this summer. The Glendale Narrows Riverwalk project, which has been planned for more than a decade, received concept design approval from the City Council in 2006, but has faced several roadblocks in reaching the construction phase. "It's a complicated project because there are a lot of stakeholders," said Sonia Nicholson, project manager with Northeast Trees, the nonprofit that is designing and building the walkway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2009 | David Zahniser
A man was found dead Sunday in the bed of the San Gabriel River near the 60 Freeway, and the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department asked the public for information about the death. The man, who was not identified, suffered blunt force trauma to his upper body, authorities said. Homicide investigators can be reached at (323) 890-5500. -- David Zahniser
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2007 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
After decades of enduring jokes about the city's concrete-lined waterway, officials today will release an ambitious master plan for restoring the Los Angeles River, a project that reflects lofty dreams and carries a big price tag. If anything, the plan is significant not for its specifics but for its sweep and boldness in proposing to turn the industrial-strength storm drain running from the San Fernando Valley to the sea into "one of the city's most treasured landmarks."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2005 | Janet Wilson and Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writers
Southern California's record rainfall ended eight days ago, but each day torrential runoff from those storms is creating new and deadly hazards in the region's icy mountain streams and usually innocuous urban rivers. This week, raging currents have killed three people: two children and a 35-year-old woman who were swept away in San Antonio Creek below snow-capped Mt. Baldy in the San Gabriel Mountains. Rescuers recovered two of their bodies Tuesday.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2004 | Lianne Hart and Scott Gold, Times Staff Writers
The Mississippi River's main channel remained closed Monday, stranding dozens of commercial and cruise ships for a third day as officials searched for the crew of a sunken supply vessel and scrambled to remove its wreckage. By Monday evening, the bodies of three of the missing men had been recovered, but officials expressed doubt that two others would be found alive. Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Jeff Murphy said the bodies might be trapped in the sunken ship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Alviso residents, who for two years have argued that weeds and silt clogging the Guadalupe River expose them to the risk of floods, will get some help this winter. On Tuesday, the Santa Clara Valley Water District board delayed a decision on whether to cut the weeds that have drastically narrowed the river channel through Alviso Slough during the last 20 years. Instead, it launched a program to find out what extra flood protection measures can be taken before this winter's rains begin.
SPORTS
June 12, 1993
I would like to clear up an unfortunate gross misperception appearing in an article, "Soot, Not Swells, Are Topic of the Day," on June 6. The reporter, John Weyler, paraphrased surfing contestants who believed the waste water treatment plant located across Pacific Coast Highway might be responsible for the "ugly brown tint" in the seawater. The "ugly brown tint" appearing in coastal waters on Sunday was in fact due to Saturday's intense rainstorm and subsequent urban and storm water runoff from the Santa Ana River.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The largest river restoration ever attempted in the West — intended to support a cornucopia of wildlife and outdoor activities — has left a 62-mile stretch of the Lower Owens so overrun with cattails, cane and bulrushes that it may take decades to bring them under control. Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa turned a knob in 2006 that opened a diversion dam gate about 235 miles north of the city, putting water back into a river essentially left dry after its flows of Sierra snowmelt were diverted to the Los Angeles Aqueduct in 1913.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1998
Even here in the city, bits of the country find ways of lingering in the most unlikely places--places that restore sanity when the mush of traffic and the jangle of cellular phones seem overwhelming. Decades of development have not been able to erase rugged slivers such as the equestrian trail that tracks the Los Angeles River between the Los Angeles Equestrian Center and Warner Bros. studios in Burbank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
Earthquake damage to the access ramps and channel walls along the Los Angeles River in Studio City will be repaired by fall, a spokesman for Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky said Wednesday. Repair of the cracks and crumbling concrete has been delayed as engineers have prioritized the severity of damage from the January 1994 Northridge earthquake, county officials said.
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