Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRiver Otters
IN THE NEWS

River Otters

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Three North America river otters have turned up in San Francisco, but not in the bay. Shasta, Tubbs and Wildcat swim and slide through a new exhibit called "Otters: Watershed Ambassadors" that opened last month at the Aquarium of the Bay on Pier 39. The otters, smaller and sleeker than their ocean counterparts, are named for Bay Area watersheds. Why? Because the aquarium wants visitors smitten with the adorable otters and their playful demeanor to care about their habitat too. “The protection and conservation of the watershed is crucial, and this new exhibit gives us the perfect opportunity to engage our guests and share this message with them,” said John Frawley, president and chief executive of Aquarium of the Bay and The Bay Institute . The $1.3-million expansion that opened June 28 includes habitat with dry land and freshwater pools filled with minnows and crayfish.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Three North America river otters have turned up in San Francisco, but not in the bay. Shasta, Tubbs and Wildcat swim and slide through a new exhibit called "Otters: Watershed Ambassadors" that opened last month at the Aquarium of the Bay on Pier 39. The otters, smaller and sleeker than their ocean counterparts, are named for Bay Area watersheds. Why? Because the aquarium wants visitors smitten with the adorable otters and their playful demeanor to care about their habitat too. “The protection and conservation of the watershed is crucial, and this new exhibit gives us the perfect opportunity to engage our guests and share this message with them,” said John Frawley, president and chief executive of Aquarium of the Bay and The Bay Institute . The $1.3-million expansion that opened June 28 includes habitat with dry land and freshwater pools filled with minnows and crayfish.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | PETER McFARREN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The government is teaming up with private investors to build a program of "ecological tourism" it hopes will bring in $1 billion a year. An important part of the plan is this huge wilderness park, the size of West Virginia, carved out of a remote area on the border with Brazil in 1976.
NATIONAL
October 24, 2009
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1998 | LINDSEY ARENT
Surrounded by rubber balls, water slides and hollow logs, Kelsie and Opie have hit river otter heaven with their new digs at the Los Angeles Zoo. But what the newly acquired 6-month-old "Houdinis of the animal world" don't know, is that major precautions have been taken to prevent them from making any great escapes. Known for their mischievous streak, river otters will explore themselves out of any environment, zoo officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2001 | SARAH HALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fishermen here have long complained about the wily river otters that steal fish and knock over bait buckets. Pesky, but hardly dangerous. But now questions, theories and rumors abound in this small Northern California mountain town ever since a 17-year-old girl was attacked by five river otters. Attack otters? "It's otterly amazing," said Glenn Hassenpflug, a spokesman at Redding Medical Center, where doctors treated Erin Vanduzer's otter bites--30 of them.
NEWS
May 24, 2005 | David Lukas
[ LUTRA CANADENSIS ] The river otter found on lakes, rivers and estuaries throughout Northern California and the Central Valley is one of the most playful animals in the world. Filled with irrepressible energy and constant chatter, the otter seems to delight in running river rapids and tobogganing down snowy hillsides or muddy riverbanks, where it climbs back up to slide down over and over.
NATIONAL
October 24, 2009
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2001 | From Times Staff, Wire Reports
River otters attacked a 17-year-old houseboat vacationer in Redding, biting and puncturing her skin more than 30 times. The severity of Monday's assault was unprecedented, wildlife officials said, though three major incidents involving otters have been reported at Shasta Lake in the last month. Erin Vanduzer was taken to Redding Medical Center, where she received more than 40 stitches, a U.S. Forest Service spokesman said. She is also receiving rabies treatments.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2011
FAMILY Watch the L.A. Zoo's chilly weather animals frolic in real snow during Snow Days at the Zoo . For one weekend only, American black bears, Sumatran tigers, North American river otters, giant otters, Asian elephants and snow leopards will get their paws on some of the cold stuff as their enclosures are blanketed with snow. Los Angeles Zoo, 5333 Zoo Drive, L.A. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat.-Sun. Free to GLAZA members with paid Zoo admission. (323) 644-4200. http://www.lazoo.org.
NEWS
May 24, 2005 | David Lukas
[ LUTRA CANADENSIS ] The river otter found on lakes, rivers and estuaries throughout Northern California and the Central Valley is one of the most playful animals in the world. Filled with irrepressible energy and constant chatter, the otter seems to delight in running river rapids and tobogganing down snowy hillsides or muddy riverbanks, where it climbs back up to slide down over and over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2001 | SARAH HALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fishermen here have long complained about the wily river otters that steal fish and knock over bait buckets. Pesky, but hardly dangerous. But now questions, theories and rumors abound in this small Northern California mountain town ever since a 17-year-old girl was attacked by five river otters. Attack otters? "It's otterly amazing," said Glenn Hassenpflug, a spokesman at Redding Medical Center, where doctors treated Erin Vanduzer's otter bites--30 of them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1998 | LINDSEY ARENT
Surrounded by rubber balls, water slides and hollow logs, Kelsie and Opie have hit river otter heaven with their new digs at the Los Angeles Zoo. But what the newly acquired 6-month-old "Houdinis of the animal world" don't know, is that major precautions have been taken to prevent them from making any great escapes. Known for their mischievous streak, river otters will explore themselves out of any environment, zoo officials said.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | PETER McFARREN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The government is teaming up with private investors to build a program of "ecological tourism" it hopes will bring in $1 billion a year. An important part of the plan is this huge wilderness park, the size of West Virginia, carved out of a remote area on the border with Brazil in 1976.
TRAVEL
May 14, 2000
A 130-acre nature preserve near Sacramento opens to visitors Saturday. The Cache Creek Nature Preserve has about 30 acres of wetlands, a riparian area along Cache Creek, one of the region's largest stands of valley oaks and farm buildings more than a century old. Entry is free, but reservations are required.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | Associated Press
Two college students have stumbled upon the virtually untouched ruins of a 1,100-year-old Anasazi Indian village in southwestern Colorado. The six-acre Mountain Sheep Village, the name given the site, probably had about 200 structures and may have housed 150 to 200 Indians as early as AD 850, said Kristie Arrington, an archeologist for the Bureau of Land Management, the agency that controls the discovery site.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|