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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1989
An estimated 100,000 gallons of raw sewage spilled into the streets of a Santa Clarita Valley neighborhood and flowed into a nearby dry riverbed after construction materials clogged a major sewer line Sunday night, authorities said. The sewage backup occurred in the area of Santa Clara Street and Honby Avenue about 8 p.m. when a 21-inch underground pipe became clogged by chunks of concrete and rock. The untreated sewage flowed into the intersection of the streets and drained into a ditch before settling in the Santa Clara River.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
Irwindale police continue to investigate the case of a decapitated corpse that was discovered Thursday in the San Gabriel riverbed. The body, described as that of an adult male, was found in some brush around 5:30 p.m. by a man scavenging for recyclables, not far from Foothill Boulevard and Irwindale Avenue, police said. The head was found 20 feet from the rest of the body. "We don't know how that occurred," Irwindale police Sgt. George Zendejas said. He said coroner's officials will determine the man's identity and the cause of death.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1989 | JAMES QUINN, Times Staff Writer
The bed of the Los Angeles River--which is occasionally used to film car chase scenes, train bus drivers and, during World War II, was utilized by Army trucks to rush munitions to the harbor--might someday be opened to commuters under a proposal being considered by county transportation planners. The concrete "river," which serves as a flood control channel, could handle commuter traffic as many as 300 days a year, experts say. Transportation planners, searching for ways to relieve Los Angeles' crowded freeways, have recommended that the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission authorize a $100,000 study of the feasibility of creating a river roadway that would be open to people in car and van pools and possibly also to trucks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2013 | By Gale Holland
Benny Perea, a veteran of two wars, found himself at age 78 sleeping on a mattress behind a liquor store and hanging out in homeless encampments along the San Gabriel River. He once owned a home in Baldwin Park and worked as a plumber for the Chevron refinery. But he struggled with addiction and saw his marriage fail. "It's going to happen to everybody all over the world, when you wake up one day and you have nobody but yourself," Perea said. Despite entreaties from advocates for the homeless, Perea had resisted moving to an apartment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1992
A decomposed body was found Sunday morning by Border Patrol agents in Jamul, San Diego County Sheriff's officials said. Agents came across the unidentified body in a riverbed thicket near California 94 and Honey Springs Road about 9:45 a.m., Sheriff's Lt. Ted Bear said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1995
Two of the Santa Ana River's wildest floods ravaged the city of Garden Grove. In 1916, water covered the area from the riverbed to the railroad tracks, where the embankment served as a dam that caused the water to rise in town. And in 1938, houses were shifted off foundations, and children rowed boats in the streets. Source: Margie Stirratt, president, Garden Grove Historical Society
BUSINESS
September 28, 2011 | Richard Verrier
About 150 crew members, supported by three motor homes, a giant crane and 10 semi-trucks, huddled under downtown's 6th Street Bridge to film a "winter scene" on the Los Angeles River. Tampering with the river, which is regulated by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, was off-limits. So producers of the "Batman" sequel "The Dark Knight Rises" built a platform over the riverbed designed with a special surface to make it look like ice. The sequence for the movie -- which is scheduled for release in theaters in July -- was part of a nighttime shoot that lighted up the industrial area, complete with fake snow, fireballs and plenty of billowing smoke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1989
In response to "Riverbed Freeway Proposal Receives Qualified Backing," Metro, Sept. 9: The Los Angeles River is neither an oasis of beauty nor an extended corridor connecting our diverse city, but it could be. We have plenty of freeways, but precious few rivers. An optimistic vision of our future includes reduced dependency on personal automobile transportation, not further freeway construction. A portion of our valuable imported water gives the river a year-round flow of relatively clean effluent as it cascades from Sierra snow to aqueduct, to lawn sprinklers, car washes and gutter runoff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2001
Regarding Gino Lynch's alarmingly titled letter, "River-Bottom Freeway" [July 15]: Mr. Lynch knows that the [Casitas Springs] bypass is not proposed to go in the riverbed. I personally showed him that the bypass would go more than 100 feet from the riverbed. Yet he conjures up an awful world where people cannot even visit the river. He also says traffic is "only dense for a total of four hours." Only? We have almost a vehicle every second for a full four hours a day. This is not simply "difficult at times," this is a serious problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1987
Homeowners in the area will meet tonight to discuss and organize opposition to a sand and gravel mine planned in the Trabuco Canyon riverbed by the Trabuco Aggregate Co. In a letter to residents of the area, Eric K. Billings, an attorney for the Richard Billings Law Corp. in Santa Ana and an organizer of the meeting, warned that the proposed excavation would disturb residents with noise, vibration, dust and traffic.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2011 | Richard Verrier
About 150 crew members, supported by three motor homes, a giant crane and 10 semi-trucks, huddled under downtown's 6th Street Bridge to film a "winter scene" on the Los Angeles River. Tampering with the river, which is regulated by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, was off-limits. So producers of the "Batman" sequel "The Dark Knight Rises" built a platform over the riverbed designed with a special surface to make it look like ice. The sequence for the movie -- which is scheduled for release in theaters in July -- was part of a nighttime shoot that lighted up the industrial area, complete with fake snow, fireballs and plenty of billowing smoke.
OPINION
July 7, 2011 | By Naomi Klein
"We're a disaster area," Alexis Bonogofsky told me, "and it's going to take a long time to get over it. " Bonogofsky and her partner, Mike Scott, are all over the news this week, telling the world about how Montana's Exxon Mobil pipeline spill has fouled their goat ranch and is threatening the health of their animals. But my conversation with Bonogofsky was four full days before the pipeline began pouring oil into the Yellowstone River. And no, it's not that she's psychic; she was talking about this year's historic flooding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2011 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
For years Cristian Gheorghiu craved the thrill of the chase. Spray-paint can in hand, he lived on the edge, always a step ahead of the law. His canvas was L.A.'s lampposts, brick walls and concrete riverbeds where he scrawled ragged images and his own nickname, "Smear" ? probably thousands of times. The graffiti made him a subculture sensation. Fans compared his art to that of another graffiti artist, the critically acclaimed Jean-Michel Basquiat. But just as the East Hollywood graffiti artist's career was taking off, his past has threatened to overtake him. First came jail and a whopping fine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2009 | By Andrew Blankstein
For as long as many can remember, the section of the Los Angeles River that runs east of downtown has been an open-air gallery for taggers. No more. Members of the self-described "Metro Transit Assassins" used the river's sloping banks for massive tags of their acronym that stretched for blocks and could be seen from passing aircraft. "Buket," who gained notoriety for tagging the Hollywood Freeway overpass, put his black-bordered, mint-green moniker here at its biggest and boldest.
SPORTS
November 30, 2008 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Dufresne is a Times staff writer.
The day was crisp and clear with a kickoff temperature of 62 degrees. Sunset left a stunning pink hue that clung to the hills that surround Reser Stadium. It almost felt like Pasadena on Jan. 1 What a backdrop. What a tease. What a Beaver bummer. Roses being housed in an adjacent building, guarded by a SWAT officer, were never threatened or presented. There wasn't much to say up here after Oregon crushed Oregon State in the 112th Civil War, 65-38. Beavers tried to make their mouths move.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2007 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Habitual sex offender Ross Wollschlager has bounced from one Ventura County hotel to another in the weeks since his release from a state mental hospital, getting ejected each time the owner learned of his identity. Publicity about his release has made it impossible for the 44-year-old convicted rapist to find a rural landlord willing to give him a place to live. After seven evictions, Liberty Healthcare Corp.
NATIONAL
January 31, 2010 | By Sandi Doughton
The fallout from Mt. Rainier's shrinking glaciers is beginning to roll downhill, and nowhere is the impact more striking than on the volcano's west side. "This is it in spades," U.S. Park Service geologist Paul Kennard said recently, scrambling up a 10-foot-high mass of dirt and boulders bulldozed back just enough to clear the road. As receding glaciers expose crumbly slopes, vast amounts of gravel and sediment are being sluiced into the rivers that flow from the region's tallest peak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The body of a 39-year-old man who died under "suspicious circumstances" was found early Saturday in the Santa Ana River bed, police said. His identity was being withheld pending notification of relatives. The body was discovered about 6:25 a.m. near a bridge in the 3000 block of West 1st Street, said Police Sgt. Jay Miller. The cause of death was unclear, Miller said, though it may have resulted from a homicide.
NEWS
May 10, 2005 | John Foster
Site: The Ricardo Formation, Red Rock Canyon State Park Where: Off Highway 14 near Ridgecrest Lore: You've seen this place before. Look at the backdrop for the Hannassey ranch in "The Big Country" or the cliffs that Zero and Stanley climb in the movie "Holes." The dramatic crags of Red Rock Canyon have been a frequent star in movies over the years.
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