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NEWS
November 26, 1997 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking an unprecedented step intended to restore a river to its natural state, the federal government Tuesday ordered the destruction of a hydroelectric dam against the wishes of its owner.
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NATIONAL
February 24, 2004 | Lianne Hart and Scott Gold, Times Staff Writers
The Mississippi River's main channel remained closed Monday, stranding dozens of commercial and cruise ships for a third day as officials searched for the crew of a sunken supply vessel and scrambled to remove its wreckage. By Monday evening, the bodies of three of the missing men had been recovered, but officials expressed doubt that two others would be found alive. Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Jeff Murphy said the bodies might be trapped in the sunken ship.
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NATIONAL
February 24, 2004 | Lianne Hart and Scott Gold, Times Staff Writers
The Mississippi River's main channel remained closed Monday, stranding dozens of commercial and cruise ships for a third day as officials searched for the crew of a sunken supply vessel and scrambled to remove its wreckage. By Monday evening, the bodies of three of the missing men had been recovered, but officials expressed doubt that two others would be found alive. Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Jeff Murphy said the bodies might be trapped in the sunken ship.
NEWS
November 26, 1997 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking an unprecedented step intended to restore a river to its natural state, the federal government Tuesday ordered the destruction of a hydroelectric dam against the wishes of its owner.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2003 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
The Frozen-Water Trade A True Story Gavin Weightman Hyperion: 254 pp., $23.95 * It wasn't a new invention, like the electric telegraph or the railway. It wasn't a new discovery, like gold in California. It was just an idea. All it required was timber, sailcloth, horsepower, manpower and the traditional skills of blacksmiths, farmers and sailors.
TRAVEL
April 17, 1988 | LUCILLE DASH, Dash is a Los Angeles free-lance writer and wine industry executive
Aside from the obvious excitement that white-water rafting offers on mild as well as action-packed rivers, there are also more subtle pleasures for the rafter--such as hiking, photography, painting, sightseeing, biking, fishing, camping and exploring unspoiled wilderness areas. On these rafting trips, powerful rivers can be frothy, churning and stirring up a storm, and other rivers purr like kittens.
NEWS
July 12, 2009 | Glenn Adams, Adams writes for the Associated Press.
A backhoe took a bite out of the Edwards Dam 10 years ago, releasing the waters of the Kennebec River that had been held back for more than a century and a half. Months after that first torrent gushed through from upstream, the entire dam was gone and the river ran free. Conservationists and sporting enthusiasts hailed the July 1, 1999, removal of the longtime landmark as a major step toward returning one of Maine's largest rivers to its natural state. Moreover, they held the project up as an example that could be followed in other states, especially those dams with sea-run fish species like the Kennebec.
SPORTS
November 17, 1996 | SIOBHAN MCDONOUGH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carefully wading through a sun-dappled river, Jane Gibbs tries not to spook the brown trout she senses nearby. She knows they're there. She's seen them and caught them before in this birch-lined stretch of the Au Sable River. Alas, on this day neither a woolly bugger nor an olive caddis fools the trout prized by fly-fishing devotees. All Ms. Gibbs has to show for her efforts are snags in some low-hanging trees and debris.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an irresistible Manhattan moment: On a winter's day when New Yorkers reveled in warm weather, snow was falling in Malibu. But smugness here over the region's unusually dry fall and winter slowly has given way to the realization that the Big Apple and much of the Eastern Seaboard, from Georgia to Maine, face a major drought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1988 | KAREN ROEBUCK, Times Staff Writer
An adventurous couple and their 2-year-old son will leave San Pedro today to circumnavigate North America in a rowboat, an expedition they expect to take two years. Kathleen and Curtis Saville, who describe themselves as "modern-day explorers," have already rowed across two oceans in their 25-foot boat, the Excalibur Pacific. They spent 83 days in 1981 rowing across the Atlantic Ocean from Morocco to the West Indies, and 392 days beginning in 1984 crossing the Pacific from Peru to Australia.
NEWS
January 12, 1999 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dave Munro is loath to lose his lake. But it could happen. After a few years of haggling and a flotilla of studies, water authorities just might pull the plug on Englebright Lake, drain it like a bathtub. That prospect has Munro, marina owner at the foothills reservoir 50 miles northeast of Sacramento, understandably aghast. If the waters departed, Munro's livelihood would be sunk, along with his tidy harbor hosting 300 houseboats and three generations of hospitality.
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