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March 9, 1990 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You have to figure that any suspect charged with grand theft avocado is in deep guacamole, especially if he's arrested in the biggest avocado bust in recent California history. And that's exactly what happened in Temecula on Wednesday night. Nine suspects were arrested in an operation conducted by the Riverside County Sheriff's Department that netted 11,000 pounds of the green fruit allegedly stolen from nearby groves.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Riverside County officials voted unanimously Tuesday to ban the use of sewage sludge from Orange County and elsewhere as fertilizer on local farmlands. The move makes Riverside one of at least six agricultural counties in the state that is unwilling to accept Southern California's mountainous stockpile of human waste. Supervisor Bob Buster said he voted for the ban because of possible health risks created when wet sludge is spread on land near houses and schools.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Riverside County officials voted unanimously Tuesday to ban the use of sewage sludge from Orange County and elsewhere as fertilizer on local farmlands. The move makes Riverside one of at least six agricultural counties in the state that is unwilling to accept Southern California's mountainous stockpile of human waste. Supervisor Bob Buster said he voted for the ban because of possible health risks created when wet sludge is spread on land near houses and schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Riverside County officials voted unanimously Tuesday to ban the use of sewage sludge from Orange County and elsewhere as fertilizer on farmlands. The move makes Riverside one of at least six agricultural counties in the state unwilling to accept Southern California's mountainous stockpile of human waste. Supervisor Bob Buster said he voted for the ban because of possible health risks created when wet sludge is spread on land near residential neighborhoods and schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Riverside County officials voted unanimously Tuesday to ban the use of sewage sludge from Orange County and elsewhere as fertilizer on farmlands. The move makes Riverside one of at least six agricultural counties in the state unwilling to accept Southern California's mountainous stockpile of human waste. Supervisor Bob Buster said he voted for the ban because of possible health risks created when wet sludge is spread on land near residential neighborhoods and schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1990
The Mediterranean fruit fly spray zone that takes in nearly all of Garden Grove, half of Westminster and parts of seven other cities will get its fourth application of malathion Thursday. In Orange County's other spray zone--an area covering eight square miles in Brea, La Habra and Fullerton--a scheduled round of spraying was cancelled Monday night because of fog and mist. Each zone is scheduled for two more sprayings: * April 16 and April 30 for the Brea area.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This prison, named after a fat, two-foot-long lizard, is located in a remote slice of the Southern California desert baked by the blistering sun, where temperatures often soar into the 120s and regularly exceed 100 degrees, even well into the fall. And September did not offer much respite. Each day last month, high temperatures at the prison--three miles south of busy Interstate 10 in the bone-dry, sweltering desert between Blythe and Indio--ranged from 100 to 112 degrees.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2007 | Peter Y. Hong and Andrea Chang, Times Staff Writers
Despite the destruction of more than 1,600 homes and buildings, massive evacuations and widespread business closures, Southern California's vast, diverse economy probably will withstand this latest disaster with little long-term damage, economists say. In fact, some observers see a boon to areas such as construction, which is down 28,600 jobs through September, a 3% decline from the previous year, according to the state Employment Development Department.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1991 | MARIA L. La GANGA and NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The worst freeze since 1937 and the worst drought since the Dust Bowl days combined to deliver an estimated $1.2-billion hit to California agriculture in 1990--a one-two punch so hard that few can remember its equal. The December cold wiped out entire crops in parts of the citrus belt, and some growers stand to lose the farm over the 14-day dip in temperature. Crop-damage estimates have reached the $700 million mark, and some 15,000 farm workers and citrus packers could be laid off. "The leaves are rolled up and the fruit.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1990 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You have to figure that any suspect charged with grand theft avocado is in deep guacamole, especially if he's arrested in the biggest avocado bust in recent California history. And that's exactly what happened in Temecula on Wednesday night. Nine suspects were arrested in an operation conducted by the Riverside County Sheriff's Department that netted 11,000 pounds of the green fruit allegedly stolen from nearby groves.
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