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Riverside County Development And Redevelopment

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BUSINESS
May 17, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Landmark Land Co. said Wednesday it has agreed to sell a 6,700-acre Riverside County parcel to Laguna Hills developer Barry Hon for $275 million and has hired an investment banking firm to peddle the company's remaining big-name golf and resort assets. The new deal comes just nine days after federal thrift regulators blocked a $967-million sale of Carmel-based Landmark's prime properties to Hon.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State water officials recently discovered that developers had leveled three patches of land near Temecula, allowing storm water, sediment and pollutants to run into nearby creeks. Given the pace of development in the Inland Empire, they weren't terribly stunned. Their next discovery, however, has placed one of the largest landowners in southern Riverside County back at the center of a fierce debate over the Temecula region's magnificent--and increasingly cluttered--rolling hills.
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NEWS
May 17, 1995 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it is finished, it will be a mecca for sports enthusiasts, with $100 million worth of marinas, campgrounds, bike trails, hiking paths, swimming pools, golf courses and places to hunt. And all within a tank of gas for millions of Southern Californians often crowded out of the region's aging and often inadequate parks. The main purpose of the Domenigoni Valley Reservoir project in Riverside County, where construction will begin this week, will be to store water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to protect the California gnatcatcher, a threatened songbird, a federal judge has issued an injunction blocking construction of a housing development in Riverside County, wildlife officials said Friday. The injunction, at least for now, halts plans by Granite Homes to build 30 homes in Lake Elsinore in the hills that hug Interstate 15 between Corona and Temecula. Joan Jewett, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife spokeswoman in Portland, Ore., said 21 of the proposed homes have already been sold.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1989 | KEVIN O'LEARY, Times Staff Writer
A Canadian company that owns one of the world's biggest malls is developing preliminary plans to build a giant shopping mall and amusement park in Riverside County south of Lake Elsinore, a county supervisor said Friday. The proposed "Mall of the World," with 2.7 million square feet of gross leaseable space, would be the largest in the state, surpassing Del Amo Fashion Plaza in Torrance and South Coast Plaza.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striving to balance the needs of an imperiled rodent with the pressures of development in Riverside County, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Friday said it would allow development of 4,400 acres of habitat occupied by the endangered Stephens kangaroo rat if the builders buy an equal amount of land for use as protected preserves for the animal. The compromise will result in the death of some kangaroo rats, small, nocturnal animals that resemble squirrels.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Koll Co. of Newport Beach announced plans Monday for a $40-million, 33-acre, mixed-use development project in this booming Riverside County bedroom community, with the Keith Cos. of Costa Mesa signed on as the first major tenant. Dubbed the Koll Corporate Center, the project will provide space for office, industrial and retail businesses, and is scheduled for ground breaking in September.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1990 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It now seems unlikely that two controversial projects approved by the federal Housing and Urban Development department will come up for hearings before a congressional subcommittee. Stuart E. Weisberg, staff director of the subcommittee, said last year that the two Southland projects--Robinson Ranch in southern Orange County and Desert Falls in Riverside County--might be the subject of subcommittee hearings that ran through much of the second half of 1989.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Riverside County supervisors approved a land-use plan that critics say opens the door for development of the ecologically sensitive Santa Rosa Plateau in the Santa Ana Mountains above Murrieta. The board's action increased the allowable building densities on the scenic plateau, much of which is owned by a Temecula developer who wants to construct 3,855 homes, a golf course, schools and commercial facilities there.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2000 | BRAD BERTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fast-growing home improvement retailer Lowe's Cos. has launched construction on one of the largest single-story buildings erected in California--a 1.25-million-square-foot distribution center on a former sod farm in the Riverside County city of Perris. The North Wilkesboro, N.C.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1997 | GRAHAM WITHERALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time Kaiser Steel Corp. staggered into bankruptcy in 1987, the once-mighty manufacturer's only products were lawsuits, debts and bitterness. The company founded by Henry Kaiser in 1941 to churn out steel for World War II warships was felled by a devastating combination of market forces and financial opportunism. But in the decade since the demise of San Bernardino County's largest industrial employer, Kaiser Ventures Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Used to be only seven or so people lived near the McConville nudist resort, and Flora "Flo" Nilson pretty much knew them all. Now the number has soared to more than 100. Residential development has invaded nearby El Cariso Village and Rancho Capistrano. "I'm just hoping the national forest can keep any large-scale development at bay," said Nilson, who for 42 years has been the owner and self-described "head nudist" of McConville, a fixture along this 32-mile road since 1933.
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it is finished, it will be a mecca for sports enthusiasts, with $100 million worth of marinas, campgrounds, bike trails, hiking paths, swimming pools, golf courses and places to hunt. And all within a tank of gas for millions of Southern Californians often crowded out of the region's aging and often inadequate parks. The main purpose of the Domenigoni Valley Reservoir project in Riverside County, where construction will begin this week, will be to store water.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For almost 25 years, a little-known water district that covers much of the Temescal Valley in Riverside County sat idle with few assets, little overhead and no customers. The Lee Lake Water District, which spans 8,400 acres of rural land along Interstate 15 between Corona and Lake Elsinore, didn't even have rights to its namesake body of water. Now, with unprecedented residential growth projected for the next two decades in the valley, the water district has come to life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Directors of the Metropolitan Water District on Tuesday gave final approval for construction of a reservoir in the Domenigoni Valley in Riverside County, which would nearly double the MWD's water storage capacity in Southern California. In approving the site, the board also appropriated $189 million to complete design work and purchase additional land. Construction is to begin in 1994 and be completed by 1999 at a cost of about $1.3 billion.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Water District, worried that an endangered rodent could block a bevy of vital water supply projects in Riverside County, has launched a study the district hopes will prove the Stephens kangaroo rat can be trapped and successfully relocated.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Urban Affairs Writer
The California slow-growth movement was left in disarray Wednesday after decisive defeats of growth-control measures in Riverside County and in the city and county of San Diego. The losses follow the crushing defeat of a slow-growth initiative in Orange County last June and raise questions about the future of a movement that only a few months ago, seemed to be gaining momentum throughout the state.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For more than a century, mining companies could declare much of the mountainous and largely uninhabited Temescal Valley their own. Operations to mine sand, gravel, tin and clay had gone about their business without the burden of government restrictions and the worry of having residents next door. But as new homes crept closer and closer, the miners of one of the richest deposits of aggregate mineral resources in Southern California found themselves in bitter battles with the new neighbors.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For more than a century, mining companies could declare much of the mountainous and largely uninhabited Temescal Valley their own. The sand, gravel, tin and clay mining operations had gone about their business without the burden of government restrictions and the worry of having residents just next door.
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