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Riverside County Economy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State agriculture officials announced Friday that a single Mediterranean fruit fly has been discovered in Riverside County, marking a leap by the pest into a new corner of Southern California and raising the possibility of aerial spraying and quarantines on its orchard-rich lands. The immature female Medfly was trapped in a commercial orange grove Wednesday in the community of Woodcrest, about 45 miles east of Los Angeles.
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BUSINESS
April 12, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
It's not really news that the fastest economic growth in California this year will be in Riverside and San Bernardino counties. The Inland Empire has been expanding in population and employment for years as affordable housing has attracted new residents. Indeed, you can judge the Inland Empire's present by the fearsome buildup of commuter traffic on freeways linking it with Los Angeles and Orange counties to the west.
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NEWS
April 6, 1998 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many who ventured east for affordable housing, Jesus Martinez of Moreno Valley paid the price with a horrendous commute. Four to five hours a day he languished in his pickup, traveling 140 miles to and from his machining job in Huntington Park. When the weekends came around, he lay numb inside his spacious, four-bedroom house, too tuckered out to even light up the backyard barbecue.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a significant escalation in the region's battle with the Mediterranean fruit fly, state agriculture officials declared a quarantine Friday on crops grown within an 81-square-mile section of Riverside County. The quarantine, which followed the trapping of a fruit fly in the midst of one of Southern California's most bountiful orange-producing regions, marked the first time the 9-month-old infestation has directly threatened the state's vast agricultural industry.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1989 | Michael Flagg Times staff writer
Boom and Gloom: Take heart: In 20 years Riverside and San Bernardino will probably be as unpleasant and as hard to get around in as Orange County is now. That's one of the conclusions of a construction market forecast of the next 20 years by Kitchell Contractors, an Irvine builder. Riverside and San Bernardino will cease to be bedroom communities for Los Angeles and Orange County.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1994 | RAY DELGADO, Thumbnail sketches of the 1995 regional economies, based on the 1995-96 Economic Forecast & Industry Outlook for California and the Los Angeles Five-County Area, as compiled by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp.:
More Good News for the Region: San Bernardino and Riverside counties, whose economic outlook was tabulated jointly, will see yet another year with a gain in employment--this time 18,000 jobs. It is the only Southern California region surveyed that has not posted a loss in jobs during California's long downturn. But the jobless rate in the fast-growing area will remain high, dipping to 9.3% from 9.7%.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A watched kettle never boils. And Southern California, the vast and populous region that is almost certainly destined for greatness in the new age of commerce across the Pacific and the border with Mexico, will endure another year of transition--or preparation--in 1996. But having come through five years of wrenching downturn and the first unfamiliar steps of recovery, the region now is poised, in the words of Winston Churchill, "at the end of the beginning."
NEWS
April 6, 1998 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many who ventured east for affordable housing, Jesus Martinez of Moreno Valley paid the price with a horrendous commute. Four to five hours a day he languished in his pickup, traveling 140 miles to and from his machining job in Huntington Park. When the weekends came around, he lay numb inside his spacious, four-bedroom house, too tuckered out to even light up the backyard barbecue.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Inland Empire, plagued by rising joblessness and soaring real estate foreclosures, can expect little relief in 1994, economists at Chapman University said Thursday. Neighboring counties will log a year of modest recovery and slight employment gains. But Riverside and San Bernardino counties are likely to see a second year of job losses as employers pare about 2,000 positions from their payrolls, said Esmael Adibi, director of the university's Center for Economic Research.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A watched kettle never boils. And Southern California, the vast and populous region that is almost certainly destined for greatness in the new age of commerce across the Pacific and the border with Mexico, will endure another year of transition--or preparation--in 1996. But having come through five years of wrenching downturn and the first unfamiliar steps of recovery, the region now is poised, in the words of Winston Churchill, "at the end of the beginning."
BUSINESS
December 26, 1994 | RAY DELGADO, Thumbnail sketches of the 1995 regional economies, based on the 1995-96 Economic Forecast & Industry Outlook for California and the Los Angeles Five-County Area, as compiled by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp.:
More Good News for the Region: San Bernardino and Riverside counties, whose economic outlook was tabulated jointly, will see yet another year with a gain in employment--this time 18,000 jobs. It is the only Southern California region surveyed that has not posted a loss in jobs during California's long downturn. But the jobless rate in the fast-growing area will remain high, dipping to 9.3% from 9.7%.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Inland Empire, plagued by rising joblessness and soaring real estate foreclosures, can expect little relief in 1994, economists at Chapman University said Thursday. Neighboring counties will log a year of modest recovery and slight employment gains. But Riverside and San Bernardino counties are likely to see a second year of job losses as employers pare about 2,000 positions from their payrolls, said Esmael Adibi, director of the university's Center for Economic Research.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1990 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the economic thumbscrews begin to turn in Southern California, some counties will feel the pain more than others. Los Angeles County will probably get the worst of it, primarily because of the downturn in the aerospace sector, said Jack Kyser, economist for the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce. And although no county will escape the recession's wrath completely, Riverside and San Bernardino likely will fare the best.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a significant escalation in the region's battle with the Mediterranean fruit fly, state agriculture officials declared a quarantine Friday on crops grown within an 81-square-mile section of Riverside County. The quarantine, which followed the trapping of a fruit fly in the midst of one of Southern California's most bountiful orange-producing regions, marked the first time the 9-month-old infestation has directly threatened the state's vast agricultural industry.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
It's not really news that the fastest economic growth in California this year will be in Riverside and San Bernardino counties. The Inland Empire has been expanding in population and employment for years as affordable housing has attracted new residents. Indeed, you can judge the Inland Empire's present by the fearsome buildup of commuter traffic on freeways linking it with Los Angeles and Orange counties to the west.
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