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Riverside County Industry

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BUSINESS
March 9, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like the rest of the Tech Coast, the Inland Empire aspires to host vibrant high-tech companies. The difference is that tech leaders in Riverside and San Bernardino counties freely admit they have a long way to go. "The challenge for the region is to knock off this fantasy of believing we can attract high-tech companies from outside the region," said Lee Hanson, an associate professor of management at Cal State San Bernardino and a member of the Inland Empire Technology Entrepreneurs.
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NEWS
April 6, 1998 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many who ventured east for affordable housing, Jesus Martinez of Moreno Valley paid the price with a horrendous commute. Four to five hours a day he languished in his pickup, traveling 140 miles to and from his machining job in Huntington Park. When the weekends came around, he lay numb inside his spacious, four-bedroom house, too tuckered out to even light up the backyard barbecue.
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NEWS
April 6, 1998 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many who ventured east for affordable housing, Jesus Martinez of Moreno Valley paid the price with a horrendous commute. Four to five hours a day he languished in his pickup, traveling 140 miles to and from his machining job in Huntington Park. When the weekends came around, he lay numb inside his spacious, four-bedroom house, too tuckered out to even light up the backyard barbecue.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like the rest of the Tech Coast, the Inland Empire aspires to host vibrant high-tech companies. The difference is that tech leaders in Riverside and San Bernardino counties freely admit they have a long way to go. "The challenge for the region is to knock off this fantasy of believing we can attract high-tech companies from outside the region," said Lee Hanson, an associate professor of management at Cal State San Bernardino and a member of the Inland Empire Technology Entrepreneurs.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For more than a century, mining companies could declare much of the mountainous and largely uninhabited Temescal Valley their own. The sand, gravel, tin and clay mining operations had gone about their business without the burden of government restrictions and the worry of having residents just next door.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine companies responsible for dumping more than half the industrial chemicals at the notorious Stringfellow Acid Pits have agreed, along with Riverside County, to pay $43.6 million in damages, leaving only the state of California as the last major defendant in the case. The settlements bring to more than $96 million the amount of damages that defendants have agreed to pay the 3,800 plaintiffs--all residents of the blue-collar community of Glen Avon, just west of here.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | ROBERT SMAUS
Experienced gardeners know all about Corona pruning shears--drop-forged pruning tools that have been around since the late 1920s. The Corona-based company produced its first pruner for the thriving Riverside County citrus industry and still is the major supplier of tools to the citrus and California grape industries. My grandfather used Corona pruners--so did my dad--and these are the only pruners I would dare leave outdoors overnight. They're tough. They're classics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2002 | JEAN O. PASCO and DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Irvine Co. has proposed stacking a freeway on top of railroad tracks through Santa Ana Canyon to relieve traffic on the Riverside Freeway, an idea that illustrates how desperate planners are to ease the daily crush on one of Southern California's most congested highways. The 10-mile freeway would be built above a heavily traveled rail line from Interstate 15 in Riverside County to the Foothill tollway in northeast Orange County, running parallel to the Riverside Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2006 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Susan Dye remembers the sting of being kept from her grieving family after her sister-in-law's funeral three years ago in Northern California. Her wheelchair couldn't negotiate the stairs to the reception. "That was kind of embarrassing and traumatic," said Dye, 51, of Murrieta. "I had known my sister-in-law for 25 years." At her home, Dye has ramps, wide doors and hallways, and other accommodations for a person in a wheelchair, and soon many homes will be like it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2003 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Billions of dollars worth of road projects planned for the exploding Inland Empire will do little to ease Southern California's mounting traffic woes, especially its monstrous commutes, new traffic analyses show. Delays for San Bernardino County drivers are projected to double by 2030. Riverside County drivers can expect daily delays to quadruple.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine companies responsible for dumping more than half the industrial chemicals at the notorious Stringfellow Acid Pits have agreed, along with Riverside County, to pay $43.6 million in damages, leaving only the state of California as the last major defendant in the case. The settlements bring to more than $96 million the amount of damages that defendants have agreed to pay the 3,800 plaintiffs--all residents of the blue-collar community of Glen Avon, just west of here.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For more than a century, mining companies could declare much of the mountainous and largely uninhabited Temescal Valley their own. The sand, gravel, tin and clay mining operations had gone about their business without the burden of government restrictions and the worry of having residents just next door.
NEWS
July 19, 1992 | LARRY SPEER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While budget-weary city and county officials across Southern California continue to fret over their fiscal crises, a tiny measure of relief has arisen: the arrival of thousands of summer interns sponsored by the federal government. This summer's relief picture began to look better than most officials had anticipated when President Bush signed a $1-billion urban aid package last month, which included $500 million for the summer jobs program.
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