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Riverside County Population

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NEWS
March 30, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's long-predicted new ethnic order became reality in the 1990s, as Latinos ascended to dominance in Los Angeles and nonwhites came to outnumber whites regionwide by more than 3 million, census data released Thursday showed. As the millennium dawned, the combined population of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Riverside counties hit 16,373,645--surpassing the statewide total in 1960 and topping all other states in 2000 except Texas and New York.
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NEWS
March 30, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's long-predicted new ethnic order became reality in the 1990s, as Latinos ascended to dominance in Los Angeles and nonwhites came to outnumber whites regionwide by more than 3 million, census data released Thursday showed. As the millennium dawned, the combined population of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Riverside counties hit 16,373,645--surpassing the statewide total in 1960 and topping all other states in 2000 except Texas and New York.
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NEWS
March 18, 1998 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fueled by a continued increase in births, a steady march of new immigrants and a robust economy, four Southern California counties were among the 10 nationwide that gained the most residents last year, according to U.S. census figures released Tuesday. Population growth in Orange, Los Angeles, San Diego and Riverside counties exceeded growth in virtually all of the nation's 3,142 counties between the summers of 1996 and 1997, the new estimates showed.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raising questions about how to accommodate growth, a new report forecasts that the population of a six-county Southern California region will increase about 43%--to about 22.35 million--by 2020. A continuing strong birth rate in the region, particularly among Latinos, will be the main cause of the growth, forecasters said.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Palmdale, once better known for its rattlesnakes and tumbleweeds than for economic development, has displaced Irvine as the fastest-growing city in California, according to study released today by the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Urban Affairs Writer
California's Inland Empire, made up of Riverside and San Bernardino counties, is the fastest-growing large metropolitan area in the country, according to report released Thursday by the U.S Census Bureau. With a growth rate of 46.2% in the 1980s, the population explosion in Riverside-San Bernardino will help ensure that the five-county area surrounding the city of Los Angeles will have experienced more growth in terms of sheer numbers of people, 2.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raising questions about how to accommodate growth, a new report forecasts that the population of a six-county Southern California region will increase about 43%--to about 22.35 million--by 2020. A continuing strong birth rate in the region, particularly among Latinos, will be the main cause of the growth, forecasters said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2005 | From Times Staff Reports
Riverside County's unprecedented population growth has stuffed county coffers with tax revenue, creating a $124-million primary reserve, county finance director Bill Luna told the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday. The 89,000 people who moved to Riverside County from June 2003 to June 2004 -- a 5% population increase, making Riverside the fastest-growing county in California -- virtually doubled expectations for economic growth, said Christopher Hans, the county's budget coordinator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2005 | Lance Pugmire and Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writers
With crowded Riverside County jails on pace to grant early releases to more than 3,000 inmates this year, Sheriff Bob Doyle plans to ask county supervisors to build a massive jail complex designed to expand with the county's population. "I need 600 beds right now to stop our early releases," Doyle said. "We've got to do something.
REAL ESTATE
July 23, 1989 | From United Press International
For the third straight year, the Mojave Desert city of Palmdale has been named the fastest growing of the 448 incorporated cities in California, a research group has found. The second-fastest growing city is Moreno Valley in Riverside County, and third is Moorpark in Ventura County, according to a survey by the Center for the Continuing Study of the California Economy, in Palo Alto. The survey also showed that the state's most intense growth is taking place in Southern California's deserts.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fueled by a continued increase in births, a steady march of new immigrants and a robust economy, four Southern California counties were among the 10 nationwide that gained the most residents last year, according to U.S. census figures released Tuesday. Population growth in Orange, Los Angeles, San Diego and Riverside counties exceeded growth in virtually all of the nation's 3,142 counties between the summers of 1996 and 1997, the new estimates showed.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Urban Affairs Writer
California's Inland Empire, made up of Riverside and San Bernardino counties, is the fastest-growing large metropolitan area in the country, according to report released Thursday by the U.S Census Bureau. With a growth rate of 46.2% in the 1980s, the population explosion in Riverside-San Bernardino will help ensure that the five-county area surrounding the city of Los Angeles will have experienced more growth in terms of sheer numbers of people, 2.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Palmdale, once better known for its rattlesnakes and tumbleweeds than for economic development, has displaced Irvine as the fastest-growing city in California, according to study released today by the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2007 | Maeve Reston, Times Staff Writer
The overburdened court system in Riverside County will get a special strike team of judges over the next four months to help clear its mounting backlog of cases. California Chief Justice Ronald M. George announced Friday that he planned to use his constitutional authority -- stemming from his duty to "equalize the work of the courts" -- to assign a team of as many as 12 active and retired judges to hear hundreds of backlogged criminal cases in Riverside County.
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