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NEWS
December 9, 1999 | MEG JAMES and MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Today's planned $274-million sale of the 91 toll lanes was abruptly halted Wednesday, withering under a storm of opposition by top state officials and the threat of a lawsuit by combative Riverside County transportation commissioners. State officials and representatives of the California Private Transportation Co., which had planned to sell the toll lanes to an Irvine-based nonprofit group, decided to pull the plug indefinitely after a flurry of teleconferences.
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NEWS
December 9, 1999 | MEG JAMES and MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Today's planned $274-million sale of the 91 toll lanes was abruptly halted Wednesday, withering under a storm of opposition by top state officials and the threat of a lawsuit by combative Riverside County transportation commissioners. State officials and representatives of the California Private Transportation Co., which had planned to sell the toll lanes to an Irvine-based nonprofit group, decided to pull the plug indefinitely after a flurry of teleconferences.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under mounting pressure from commuters to unclog the swamped Riverside Freeway, government officials in Riverside County disclosed Monday that they are considering taking over the privately owned 91 Express Lanes. The 91 Express Lanes--the only operating private toll road in California--have been roundly criticized in Riverside, where commuters and politicians see them as a roadblock to improving snarled freeway conditions for Orange County and Los Angeles-bound drivers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under mounting pressure from daily commuters to unclog the swamped Riverside Freeway, government officials in that county disclosed Monday that they want the 91 Express Lanes condemned in an effort to open the private tollway to the public.
WORLD
December 13, 2011 | By Jonathan Kaiman, Los Angeles Times
Maliya Suo is more than 90 years old, but she can still skin a squirrel. In her prime, she could shoot a pheasant in flight. She was once the greatest reindeer herder in her tribe. In her old age, Suo is taking on an even tougher adversary: the Chinese government. A member of the nomadic Ewenki community that lives primarily in China's Inner Mongolia region, Suo has resisted the government's effort to resettle her in the world of buildings, money and cars. In 2003, Suo and 2,000 fellow tribe members were forcibly relocated from their encampment to a "resettlement site" 120 miles away, on the outskirts of Genhe, a dilapidated riverside city.
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