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NEWS
April 28, 1993 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bernard Kinsey drives like a man with no time to waste: fast, anticipating and then skirting even the slightest slow-up. Anyone who wants to follow had better stick close. But, he says, "when I go into 'the neighborhood,' I am more conscious of not breaking any speed laws because I don't want to be stopped and humiliated. Anybody in the black community feels that way because for so many years it has been that way."
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BUSINESS
July 21, 1999 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
C. Robert Kemp, who has headed the federally funded Los Angeles Community Development Bank through its beleaguered three years of existence, is stepping down for health reasons, bank officials announced Tuesday. The bank's board of directors named former RLA President Linda Griego to temporarily take the helm of the $430-million loan fund--the federal government's largest response to the 1992 riots.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993
For some time, The Times has tried to denigrate the achievements of Rebuild L.A. As RLA continues its efforts to attract private investment to Los Angeles' low-income communities, The Times has taken every opportunity to feature naysayers who have not offered any constructive programs to help the rebuilding process. RLA's mission is straightforward: bringing business opportunities into economically depressed areas. RLA's efforts can be complemented by other programs with different objectives.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
Nancy Pappas did not report to her corporate office for an entire year, leaving her workload to be distributed among her colleagues. And when she finally did return, Pappas wasn't given her old job back. She was promoted. Pappas works for Xerox Corp. as a marketing manager in the Century City office. But in 1993, Pappas devoted her energies to Rebuild L.A.
OPINION
January 23, 1994
Robert Scheer's interview with Bernard Kinsey (Commentary, Jan. 12) offers a view of RLA's role in the rebuilding process which, while not exactly inaccurate, skews facts and figures. In at least two vital respects, the record must be balanced. Buildings may have been rebuilt, but businesses and jobs haven't been rebuilt. That fact, coupled with rebuilt businesses which still are not economically viable, accounts for much of the severe economic hardship that grips most of the neighborhoods RLA was created to serve.
OPINION
November 21, 1993
Simply put, Bernard Kinsey is a winner who dared to play in a game that was fraught with losing propositions. Because he chose to play anyway there are institutions and organizations that benefited from his courage and indomitable will. As chairman of the Marcus Garvey School Foundation, the fund-raising arm of the legendary Marcus Garvey School, I can attest to his generosity and compassion. It's important to note that during his tenure at Rebuild L.A. (RLA) Kinsey has consistently sought out ways to improve the human condition of those who simply needed assistance (Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1993
On behalf of the student-owners at Food From the 'Hood, I want to thank Ron Harris for his column about our company (Oct. 22). We would also like to publicly thank Rebuild L.A. for its ongoing business assistance. RLA introduced us to our minority-owned investment banking firm (Luther, Smith & Small, which is working with us on a pro bono basis), as well as to our business partners: Sweet Adelaide, our Hawthorne-based salad dressing manufacturer; and Your Type, our South-Central-based label printer.
OPINION
December 13, 1992 | TOM BRADLEY, TOM BRADLEY, mayor of Los Angeles, talks about the program he has instituted to help the city avert trouble at the conclusion of two potentially explosive trials related to the Rodney King beating:
Last spring's upheaval dramatically altered our moral landscape, and we have all been forced to think again about what it means to live in Los Angeles. My job for the next seven months is to work to ensure that only the positive changes created by the unrest will endure for our children and grandchildren. That's what our Neighbor-to-Neighbor program is all about. Through the ashes and rubble we saw neighbors coming to the aid of their neighbors. That activism is still alive.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
Nancy Pappas did not report to her corporate office for an entire year, leaving her workload to be distributed among her colleagues. And when she finally did return, Pappas wasn't given her old job back. She was promoted. Pappas works for Xerox Corp. as a marketing manager in the Century City office. But in 1993, Pappas devoted her energies to Rebuild L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1994 | PAUL FELDMAN
RLA's new chief executive, Linda Griego, has cut the riot-recovery agency's paid staff nearly in half to 15 people in order to keep RLA afloat until 1997, when it is scheduled to go out of business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of RLA on Wednesday chose the nine-campus Los Angeles Community College District to inherit the assets of the private agency that was formed to help the region economically recover from the 1992 riots but never fulfilled its early promises. RLA's databases and about $200,000 in cash will be given to a new arm of the college district by January, according to agency President Linda Griego. RLA, formerly known as Rebuild L.A.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
RLA, the private agency that served as the city's main response to the deadly 1992 riots, is now preparing for its own demise, offering to give away its assets amid lingering questions about its legacy. The nonprofit economic development organization, originally known as Rebuild L.A., was mandated at birth to go out of business five years after the civil disturbances that spurred its creation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1995 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
RLA board Chairman Lodwrick M. Cook, saying he is feeling healthy after coronary artery bypass surgery, agreed Tuesday to stay on through year's end in his part-time executive role with the private riot recovery organization. However, seven other members of RLA's 79-member board, including Cardinal Roger M. Mahony and Hollywood agent Michael Ovitz, have decided to resign, RLA officials announced at their quarterly meeting at USC.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | STEPHEN GREGORY
Residents fighting for a voice in the redevelopment of riot-ravaged vacant lots have won support from one of the city's foremost redevelopment proponents: RLA Director Linda Griego. In a recent community meeting with more than 150 residents, Griego wholeheartedly backed community participation in her efforts for redevelopment plans over the next 18 months of about 250 parcels of land left vacant by the 1992 riots. Last year, Griego took the reins of RLA, formerly Rebuild L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
Despite a series of setbacks and criticism that her organization is not moving fast enough, RLA President Linda Griego said this week she is optimistic that the group will achieve its goal of revitalizing areas ravaged by the 1992 riots. Griego told the Calabasas Rotary Club on Thursday that RLA, formerly Rebuild L.A., will stick to its twin-pronged strategy of encouraging retailers to locate in blighted areas of Los Angeles and of helping existing businesses in those areas expand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1995 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wanted: A new chairman for a nonprofit organization with an 87-member board of directors and a paid staff of roughly a quarter that size. The agency has a meager budget, limited expectations, and it promises to go out of business in two years. RLA, the privately run riot relief effort created by government officials in the wake of 1992's civil unrest, is seeking a new board chairman with Arco Chairman Lodwrick M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1994 | PAUL FELDMAN
In the first major exodus of RLA board members, 16 community leaders--including Police Chief Willie L. Williams, City Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas and Southern California Edison Chairman John Bryson--have resigned from the nonprofit rebuilding agency formed after the 1992 Los Angeles riots. At the same time, RLA, initially known as Rebuild L.A., has added 10 new board members, bringing the membership of the already massive board of directors to 87. The new members are Japanese Business Assn.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
RLA, the private agency that served as the city's main response to the deadly 1992 riots, is now preparing for its own demise, offering to give away its assets amid lingering questions about its legacy. The nonprofit economic development organization, originally known as Rebuild L.A., was mandated at birth to go out of business five years after the civil disturbances that spurred its creation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1994
Citing fiscal and logistic considerations, the riot recovery RLA agency has scrapped plans to open three satellite offices that had been described as an effort to reach out to small businesses in impoverished neighborhoods. RLA President Linda Griego said research had shown that "physically setting up (the offices) was going to be too expensive and not necessarily too productive." The offices had been planned for South-Central Los Angeles, Southeast Los Angeles and the Van Nuys-Pacoima area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1994 | PAUL FELDMAN
In the first major exodus of RLA board members, 16 community leaders--including Police Chief Willie L. Williams, City Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas and Southern California Edison Chairman John Bryson--have resigned from the nonprofit rebuilding agency formed after the 1992 Los Angeles riots. At the same time, RLA, initially known as Rebuild L.A., has added 10 new board members, bringing the membership of the already massive board of directors to 87. The new members are Japanese Business Assn.
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