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February 15, 1993 | Chris Woodyard., Times Staff Writer
Joseph F. Prevratil, 55, has become a Captain Fix-it for Long Beach's landmark Queen Mary. When Walt Disney Co. abandoned the liner last year, it seemed as though the city might sell it. Enter Prevratil, a Fullerton resident who once ran the Movieland Wax Museum in Buena Park and operated the Queen Mary during most of the 1980s. With the financial backing of Robert Gumbiner, chairman of FHP Inc. in Fountain Valley, Prevratil plans to reopen the ship Feb. 26.
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BUSINESS
February 15, 1993 | Chris Woodyard., Times Staff Writer
Joseph F. Prevratil, 55, has become a Captain Fix-it for Long Beach's landmark Queen Mary. When Walt Disney Co. abandoned the liner last year, it seemed as though the city might sell it. Enter Prevratil, a Fullerton resident who once ran the Movieland Wax Museum in Buena Park and operated the Queen Mary during most of the 1980s. With the financial backing of Robert Gumbiner, chairman of FHP Inc. in Fountain Valley, Prevratil plans to reopen the ship Feb. 26.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2000
A foundation that runs the Queen Mary settled a lawsuit Tuesday with the Museum of Latin American Art, which alleged that the operators of the ocean liner owed the museum at least $1 million. The art museum sued the RMS Foundation several years ago, alleging that a $1-million promissory note given to it by philanthropist Robert Gumbiner was not part of a gift Gumbiner gave the foundation in 1993 to help deal with financial problems.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | STEVE EAMES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The nonprofit group that runs the Queen Mary had little trouble winning a three-year vote of confidence from the Long Beach City Council this week, but still has to persuade the city to make a long-term commitment to keep the historic ship, officials say. The council assured the operator, RMS Foundation, that the waterfront attraction will stay open at least through the end of the group's five-year operating lease, which expires in 1998. The council also directed City Manager James C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1993
What do you do with a huge dome built next to the Queen Mary to shelter a one-of-a-kind giant seaplane that flew the coop? Use it as a stage for a science fiction film, say French movie makers. BYFG Productions has rented the dome for eight months to build a space station set for the film "Star Gate," starring Kurt Russell. The 150-foot-tall dome on a pier near the Queen Mary's stern has been empty since the behemoth Spruce Goose was shipped to Oregon in October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1993
A grand-opening celebration with bands, bagpipes, a wandering puppet theater and fireworks will be held today at the Queen Mary, marking the ship's return to full operation as a tourist attraction. The city-owned ocean liner was shut down last December by the Walt Disney Co., which decided not to renew its operating lease after years of losing money. A nonprofit foundation, the RMS Foundation Inc., acquired the operating lease and reopened portions of the ship Feb. 26.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1995
The Long Beach City Council assured operators of the Queen Mary on Tuesday that the waterfront landmark will remain open for at least three years, and directed city staff to negotiate a much longer operating lease. The City Council's assurances will enable the operator, RMS Foundation, to borrow money to keep the floating hotel and tourist attraction in business. RMS had signed a five-year lease in 1993 and is seeking a 20-year extension.
NEWS
March 3, 1994
The Queen Mary lost $4.2 million in 1993, with only one profitable month in the first year of operation under new management. Officials from the RMS Foundation, headed by Joseph F. Prevratil, attributed the loss mainly to start-up costs and said December, 1993, earnings of $33,420 indicated a turnaround. Prevratil said he expected to lose money the first year. RMS spent $3 million initially to reopen and refurbish the city's best-known landmark after the former operators, The Walt Disney Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1993
A nonprofit corporation backed by Robert Gumbiner, chairman of the board of FHP Health Care and a wealthy philanthropist, has emerged as the key financial backer of a plan to reopen and run the Queen Mary, sources said Friday. The Long Beach City Council on Dec. 22 awarded a five-year operating lease to Queen Mary Partners Ltd., a for-profit group of investors headed by Joseph F. Prevratil. But that group never finalized the lease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1993
Starting today, tourists who want to visit the Queen Mary will have to pay. Officials are abandoning the ship's free admission policy because a crush of visitors have spent too little money at the historic ocean liner, a spokesman said. The thrifty visitors pushed up security and maintenance expenses, which pushed down income. The new admission charge--$5 for adults and $3 for children 4 and older--is a spending minimum, said Joseph F. Prevratil, president of the RMS Foundation Inc.
NEWS
September 8, 1994 | JOHN POPE
The Queen Mary continued to lose money through the first six months of 1994, but the historic ship is having a profitable summer, operators said. The ship lost about $614,000 from April through June, the second quarter of the year. More than 73,000 people toured the attraction during that time, producing about $4 million in revenue. Figures were not available for July and August, but officials from the RMS Foundation Inc.
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