Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRo Jai Bong
IN THE NEWS

Ro Jai Bong

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Roh Tae Woo today named as South Korea's new prime minister a former professor who, while serving as education minister, alienated liberal teachers by blocking their efforts to set up a teachers' union. Chung Won Shik, 62, who served in the Cabinet for nearly two years until Dec. 27, was picked to replace Ro Jai Bong, 55, who submitted his resignation Wednesday, the presidential Blue House announced.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Roh Tae Woo today named as South Korea's new prime minister a former professor who, while serving as education minister, alienated liberal teachers by blocking their efforts to set up a teachers' union. Chung Won Shik, 62, who served in the Cabinet for nearly two years until Dec. 27, was picked to replace Ro Jai Bong, 55, who submitted his resignation Wednesday, the presidential Blue House announced.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the midst of political unrest triggered by police beating a student to death, President Roh Tae Woo's government admitted Wednesday that police had brutally beaten a second protester. Another South Korean, meanwhile, set himself afire--the ninth since April 26--and leaped from a hospital roof condemning Roh's policies. Both of the protesters were reported in critical condition.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the midst of political unrest triggered by police beating a student to death, President Roh Tae Woo's government admitted Wednesday that police had brutally beaten a second protester. Another South Korean, meanwhile, set himself afire--the ninth since April 26--and leaped from a hospital roof condemning Roh's policies. Both of the protesters were reported in critical condition.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that was widely expected to defuse much of the political tension that has beleaguered President Roh Tae Woo since late April, Prime Minister Ro Jai Bong submitted his resignation today, the president's office announced. In an unscheduled one-hour meeting, Ro, 54, told the president he intends to resign "to accommodate the people's sentiment and rejuvenate the atmosphere for conducting national affairs."
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Roh Tae Woo named a new prime minister and foreign minister and reshuffled eight other Cabinet posts in a bid to spruce up his party's image before next year's elections. Ro Jai Bong, 54, a chief aide and former university professor, was named to succeed Prime Minister Kang Young Hoon, who reportedly had asked to retire. The new foreign minister is Lee Sang Ok, current ambassador to Switzerland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991
South Korea's annual spring riot ritual--radical students throw rocks and firebombs at police, police fling pepper gas canisters at students--this year took a vicious turn. In Seoul on April 26 riot police beat to death a student demonstrator. The killing was a shocking departure from form. Usually in these protests, for all the smoke and fire and high emotions, fatalities are avoided, not least because the riot police don't carry firearms.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The toll in South Korea's monthlong protest rose to nine dead Saturday as a student was killed, apparently trampled as she and other protesters fled a barrage of virulent pepper gas in downtown Seoul. She was identified as Kim Kwi Jung, 25, a junior at Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul.
NEWS
May 15, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo succeeded Tuesday in preventing a funeral procession for a student beaten to death by police from marching to City Hall, but mourners and protesters, whose ranks swelled to more than 50,000 at one point, showed no sign of letup in their demands for Roh's ouster. They promised to renew their effort to march on the city center today.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The biggest demonstrations since South Korean President Roh Tae Woo took office in 1988 paralyzed at least four major sections of the capital Thursday night in what appeared to be a widening of nearly two weeks of protests. Students' wrath had been focused on the slaying of one of their comrades, beaten to death by five riot police officers April 26.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that was widely expected to defuse much of the political tension that has beleaguered President Roh Tae Woo since late April, Prime Minister Ro Jai Bong submitted his resignation today, the president's office announced. In an unscheduled one-hour meeting, Ro, 54, told the president he intends to resign "to accommodate the people's sentiment and rejuvenate the atmosphere for conducting national affairs."
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move considered certain to exacerbate already intensifying political unrest, President Roh Tae Woo's ruling party Friday rammed through the National Assembly two bills it described as reforms of authoritarian laws left over from his predecessor's regime. With opposition politicians occupying the rostrum, Speaker Park Joon Kyu stood at the entrance of the assembly hall, announced the introduction of the bills and declared them passed--all within one minute.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a north Manila suburb, Hi-Top Supermarket supervisor Mary Yap worries aloud about nervous crowds of shoppers who have nearly emptied the huge store's shelves of canned goods, sugar and rice. "It's panic buying," she said. "Everyone is afraid of war." In Germany, officials have tightened security at airports and borders against terrorist attacks. In London, contingency war plans include using old army camps to intern British-based Iraqis deemed dangerous to the state.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|