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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1990
I don't know how Joseph E. Monroe of Costa Mesa (Letters, Jan. 31) could possibly compare Gov. Deukmejian with the Brown/Gianturco regime when it comes to highway construction, maintenance and expression. The new construction and expansion, not to mention renovation, is obvious everywhere. What person, with five minutes to think about it, wouldn't figure out how adversely the state of California would be affected by ceasing the building, improving and refurbishing of the freeways and highways like Brown did. What I really think puts a feather in California's cap is how well the economy has done in spite of Brown's shortsighted policies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel and Adolfo Flores
Three north Orange County cities scrambled Monday to reopen roads and buildings following a magnitude 5.1 quake that snapped water lines, damaged chimneys and left a well-traveled thoroughfare covered in dirt and boulders. Still, as the workweek began and the extent of damage came into sharper focus, city officials said it appeared the cities along the Los Angeles County border had been lightly touched despite the size of the quake and the continuing aftershocks. The biggest concern was Carbon Canyon Road, which remained closed Monday as a result of a rock slide Friday, said Anna Cave, emergency preparedness coordinator in Brea.
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OPINION
January 7, 1996
The U.S. Army's Southern Command, based in the Panama Canal Zone, should think twice before it commits to building roads near Panama's vanishing rain forests--at least until a careful assessment of the project's environmental impact has been made. Under a compromise agreement with the Panama government, several thousand National Guardsmen will descend in January on a buffer zone that protects Panama's precious rain forest from urban encroachment and begin building a 7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel and Adolfo Flores
On Monday northern Orange County cities were working on reopening roads and buildings that sustained damage from last week's 5.1 earthquake. Buildings in Brea didn't suffer any significant structural damage, said Anna Cave, emergency preparedness coordinator. Most of the calls the city received from residents were for walls or chimneys. Their biggest concern was Carbon Canyon Road, which remained closed Monday as a result of a rock slide on Friday, Cave said. The Brea road, used by an estimated 21,000 commuters a day, was expected to open at 4 a.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
June 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth is assuming authority over road building and logging in a third of national forests while the Bush administration revises a Clinton-era ban on those activities. In a memo, Bosworth instructed officials overseeing forests to consider the long-term protection of roadless areas as they make scheduled revisions to the forests' management plans. Until the work is done, Bosworth will oversee timber harvests and roadless areas.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
A battle over property rights, waged across western states for more than two decades, has heated up again with an attempt by the Clinton Administration to curtail the development of roads across national parks and wilderness land. The controversy affects some of America's wildest and most beautiful land, including Alaska's Denali National Park, where 30 proposed roads would crisscross the habitat of bears, wolves and a host of other wild animals; Alaska's remote Wrangell-St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals court ruled Friday that a controversial blueprint for managing national forests in the Sierra Nevada was flawed because the U.S. Forest Service didn't adequately assess how fish would be affected by increases in logging and road building. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decision is the latest step in a legal battle over changes the Bush administration made to guidelines for the 11 national forests that run the length of the range. Amendments to a Clinton-era plan ramped up logging levels in the Sierra, allowed more road construction and weakened restrictions on grazing — all practices that affect water quality and fish habitat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1987
Between 1975 and 1985 the U.S. government lost $2.1 billion from losses on below-cost timber sales. Yet despite the losses in 1986 the government has allocated $229 million to the Forest Service for building new logging roads in 1987. These roads will allow more timber sales that will lose the government more money and will be constructed in wild areas, forever eliminating these areas from designated wilderness consideration. The Forest Service has been on a massive road-building binge for decades, impoverishing sublime landscapes.
OPINION
December 12, 2009
One job-stimulus idea: Have the federal government pay $1 million to keep several dozen people employed for just a few months while damaging a protected part of the largest intact temperate rain forest in the world. Ridiculous as it sounds, that's what the Obama administration was bent on doing until a judge's order stopped it this week. The U.S. Department of Agriculture had agreed to allow a lumber company to clear-cut 381 acres of the Tongass National Forest in Alaska in what had previously been declared a "roadless area," meaning it was supposed to be protected from road building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1986
Legislation giving San Diego County the right to build roads with sales tax revenue now reserved for public transit projects was approved Wednesday in the Assembly and sent to Gov. George Deukmejian. The bill, by Assemblywoman Sunny Mojonnier (R-Encinitas), would allow the county to use the transit funds for rural roads in unincorporated areas of the county. Before the funds could be used for road building, the San Diego Assn.
WORLD
March 22, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
  With a gnarled hand, the elderly widow picks up a rock and taps it with another rock until it shatters. Then she tosses the pebbles into a small pile. The tap-tap of stone on stone echoes like drips in a cave as women pound stones to pebbles in the blasting heat of Rock City, on the outskirts of Juba, capital of the new nation of South Sudan. Davidka Clement made the long trek to Juba from her village a few years ago. She had heard that South Sudan, which fought for decades for independence from Sudan, would soon become an independent country with its own leaders, who would care about people like her. The country became a reality in July, to momentous celebration, but it changed nothing for Clement or the other pebble women of Rock City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals court ruled Friday that a controversial blueprint for managing national forests in the Sierra Nevada was flawed because the U.S. Forest Service didn't adequately assess how fish would be affected by increases in logging and road building. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decision is the latest step in a legal battle over changes the Bush administration made to guidelines for the 11 national forests that run the length of the range. Amendments to a Clinton-era plan ramped up logging levels in the Sierra, allowed more road construction and weakened restrictions on grazing — all practices that affect water quality and fish habitat.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals court Friday upheld a Clinton administration rule that bans road-building and logging on roughly a quarter of the country's national forestland. The unanimous decision by a three-judge panel of the 10th Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals could settle one of the most contentious conservation issues of the last decade. The 2001 roadless rule, issued in the final days of the Clinton administration, generated lawsuits, conflicting court opinions and repeal efforts.
OPINION
December 12, 2009
One job-stimulus idea: Have the federal government pay $1 million to keep several dozen people employed for just a few months while damaging a protected part of the largest intact temperate rain forest in the world. Ridiculous as it sounds, that's what the Obama administration was bent on doing until a judge's order stopped it this week. The U.S. Department of Agriculture had agreed to allow a lumber company to clear-cut 381 acres of the Tongass National Forest in Alaska in what had previously been declared a "roadless area," meaning it was supposed to be protected from road building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2009 | Associated Press
A judge Wednesday tossed out the federal government's plans to open vast tracts of forests in Southern California to new road building. U.S. District Judge Marilyn Hall Patel ruled that the U.S. Forest Service failed to adequately consider the plan's effects on the landscape and wildlife in the Angeles, Cleveland, Los Padres and San Bernardino national forests. Environmental groups and the state of California sued the Bush administration in 2008 over the plan, which covers 1 million acres.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2009 | Bettina Boxall
A federal appeals court on Wednesday reinstated national protections for some of the country's wildest forest lands, the latest twist in a nearly decadelong legal battle. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals found that the Bush administration had skirted environmental laws when it effectively repealed a 2001 rule that barred road building and timber cutting on nearly a third of America's national forest land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997
Taxpayer subsidies to logging companies that cut roads through federal forests have proven fiscally wasteful and environmentally destructive. Bipartisan legislation scheduled to come before the House today would end this federal giveaway. It's time to do so. More than 380,000 miles of dirt logging roads already web the nation's forests. That's enough to circle the Earth nearly 15 times. In some parts of the Northwest, one square mile of forest is laced with up to 20 miles of road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1989
Prime Minister Takeshita, in the 2 1/2 hour session which marked George Bush's first meeting as President with a foreign leader, declared repeatedly that the United States and Japan should cooperate on more equal footing on "joint endeavors in order to create a better world." We can applaud these words, but when will we see concrete evidence that Japan is ready to put these ideals ahead of the lure of immediate profits? I would point specifically to Japan's failure to abide by agreements to stop killing whales.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
The Obama administration waded into a nearly decadelong debate over roadless areas in national forests Thursday, announcing what amounts to a timeout from most new logging and development in pristine areas across the West. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack issued the yearlong order, which shifts decisions about development in roadless areas away from U.S. Forest Service officials and requires that he approve all new projects.
OPINION
April 2, 2009 | James William Gibson, James William Gibson is a professor of sociology at Cal State Long Beach and the author of the forthcoming book, "A Reenchanted World: The Quest for a New Kinship with Nature."
On Monday, President Obama signed the Omnibus Public Lands Management Act, placing more than 2 million acres of public land in nine states under Wilderness Act protection. The new legislation preserves remote glacial valleys in Wyoming, fragile deserts in California and dense forests in northern Michigan, making these and other tracts of pristine land permanently off-limits to road building, oil and gas drilling and commercial timber harvesting.
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